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There has been a correction. The bill passed the legislature but has not been signed into law yet.

This kind of rights supporting thinking has me considering Oklahoma as a possible home for the first time ever. Still don't think I would do it, but certainly the first time I've wondered what real estate prices are like there.
 
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There has been a correction. The bill passed the legislature but has not been signed into law yet.

This kind of rights supporting thinking has me considering Oklahoma as a possible home for the first time ever. Still don't think I would do it, but certainly the first time I've wondered what real estate prices are like there.

Watch the movie "Twister"... ;)
 
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There has been a correction. The bill passed the legislature but has not been signed into law yet.

This kind of rights supporting thinking has me considering Oklahoma as a possible home for the first time ever. Still don't think I would do it, but certainly the first time I've wondered what real estate prices are like there.
I grew up there. Constitutional carry. Crazy cheap cost of living. Great salaries depending on your industry. Friendly, genuine people. Hunting is big. Great restaurants and events depending on your preferences. Not sure I could leave the natural resources of the PNW but it's NOT exactly like Twister. I lived there 30 years and "experienced" only one tornado. But it's not unlike Twister either. They're very real and very destructive but there are areas of the state where they're less common
 
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but there are areas of the state where they're less common

True, but the warning applies because the poster did not specify where in OK he wanted to be...

My SIL lives in NW Ark and was an EMT for many years. He worked the Moore OK tornado and several other OK tornado sites... Those were hugely/immensively destructive with loss of lives and property. it's not like it's uncommon! And hasn't Moore been hit a number of times? But it's interesting that my Bentonville Ark seems to be a tornado shadow... they go either north or south around their area. Might be able to find something like that in OK.
 
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True, but the warning applies because the poster did not specify where in OK he wanted to be...

My SIL lives in NW Ark and was an EMT for many years. He worked the Moore OK tornado and several other OK tornado sites... Those were hugely/immensively destructive with loss of lives and property. it's not like it's uncommon! And hasn't Moore been hit a number of times? But it's interesting that my Bentonville Ark seems to be a tornado shadow... they go either north or south around their area. Might be able to find something like that in OK.
Please don't fear-monger if you have no personal experience to share. I lived in the Oklahoma City area from 1971-1997 and then again from 2011-2014, 29 years total. Yes Moore, Oklahoma has been hit twice in modern history by major storms that produced very destructive tornadoes, with significant loss of property and life. However that is an anomaly. There is no way to predict that tornadoes will strike a certain part of a state with greater frequency. Evidence is anecdotal only and with severe weather it is only predictable within a very short time frame. Oklahoma has it's downsides, but Oklahoma natives are, for the most part, genuine and friendly folk. As was mentioned, real estate prices are generally some of the lowest in the country, but jobs seem to be always plentiful except during oil industry crashes (again, rare). It is a decent place to live, and the politics are agreeable to those with a conservative bias. What you give up compared to Oregon is more extreme weather (both cold and hot), severe spring and early summer storms that can produce wind, large hail and tornadoes, and a more rustic, less beautiful landscape (in the eye of the beholder obviously).
 
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OK is very veteran friendly and are exempt from sales tax. Excellent first time home buyer opportunities. Lots of good ol' boys.

This kind of rights supporting thinking has me considering Oklahoma as a possible home for the first time ever. Still don't think I would do it, but certainly the first time I've wondered what real estate prices are like there.

I wouldn't recommend selling the farm and moving without spending a good amount of time there.

What you give up compared to Oregon is more extreme weather (both cold and hot), severe spring and early summer storms that can produce wind, large hail and tornadoes, and a more rustic, less beautiful landscape (in the eye of the beholder obviously).

I've seen hail the size of grapefruit in OK, it would straight up kill you if you got hit in the head with it. Triple digit temperatures with high 90's percent humidity. The lightning and thunderstorms are nothing short of impressive.
 
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Native Okie here Sooner born and bred, news like this is exactly why my stay here will be temporary at best ( I still own property there) as I only came here for work. Oklahoma and a few other states continue to move towards greater levels of liberty while others move towards ever more levels of authoritarianism.

Do not get me wrong Oregon has things I have come to love in 5 years , I like being an hour from the coast, the mountains and then a couple of hours from the desert . Its stunning ... factually there is a lot to love out here, everything but the politics .


Hence my only being a part time resident here.

Having said that Oklahoma has a very diverse geography which includes an area in eastern Oklahoma that looks very much like the Willamette valley. There is a lot of lakes , rivers, creeks, mountains and valleys. It's timber and coal country where logging and mining is still very actively engaged in.

Central Oklahoma is rolling hills and grasslands, and western Oklahoma is the great plains that the plains indians and buffalo once roamed. The reason I share all this is because I know people not from there tend to be ignorant about this point and think Oklahoma is like Kansas which is all flat, nothing could be further from the truth.
 
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Not true. While they are not as frequent or severe as Tornado Ally they do indeed occur in Oregon.
6 tornadoes that touched down in the Pacific Northwest

Factually speaking Tornadoes can occur anywhere, they occur more frequently in the midwest because that is the location where warm and cold air fronts collide due to the jet stream , etc. The midwest is weather central, every type of extreme weather can be had there.
 
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Please don't fear-monger if you have no personal experience to share. I lived in the Oklahoma City area from 1971-1997 and then again from 2011-2014, 29 years total. Yes Moore, Oklahoma has been hit twice in modern history by major storms that produced very destructive tornadoes, with significant loss of property and life. However that is an anomaly. There is no way to predict that tornadoes will strike a certain part of a state with greater frequency. Evidence is anecdotal only and with severe weather it is only predictable within a very short time frame. Oklahoma has it's downsides, but Oklahoma natives are, for the most part, genuine and friendly folk. As was mentioned, real estate prices are generally some of the lowest in the country, but jobs seem to be always plentiful except during oil industry crashes (again, rare). It is a decent place to live, and the politics are agreeable to those with a conservative bias. What you give up compared to Oregon is more extreme weather (both cold and hot), severe spring and early summer storms that can produce wind, large hail and tornadoes, and a more rustic, less beautiful landscape (in the eye of the beholder obviously).

Alrighty then. I've never been in a fatal car crash while driving drunk on a winding road at 150mph either. Should I not warn somebody that there is a high possibility of injury or death during a discussion that features a plan or thoughts to do such things? Is that fear-mongering too? I'll answer... of course not! Personal experience has no bearing on the subject.

But to use your own logic, and I have been thru OK a number of times, just not lived there, I'll continue to give out the warning due to the personal experiences of close friends and relatives that live, work, and have answered the call for assistance/help for weeks away from home as EMTs during a tornado disaster/tragedy. And due to living on earth for 67yrs and being aware that the middle states are a kind of tornado alley where cold fronts meet wet/hot/humid fronts and violent weather occurs on a regular basis. It's a fact that you cannot deny.

Please don't be so sensitive/defensive... I wasn't attacking or badmouthing your state. But the facts are, that they have tornadoes (sp?) there and not anywhere near as often in other states that are just as nice to live. Note that I didn't attack the people, the politics, the real estate, the fishing or hunting, the music stars, or anything else but gave a warning about the frequency of tornadoes. Tho I'm curious as to why the movie "Twister" is not a good example when I've watched 100 dozen stormchaser vids that seemed not much diff exept for the silliness of surviving in a wellhouse or whatever it was. I did NOT say don't move there. Would YOU say "Yeah, move there, it's great, nothing to worry about there, shoot they don't even have water moccasins!" Shhhh, let's not mention tornadoes... ever!!!

My kids say that there has only ever been one tornado that hit Bentonville despite living in a tornado prone area and tornadoes traveling in close proximity quite often, nobody knows why they don't get hit, but they don't... are you suggesting that they are lying, incorrect, and that places like that don't exist?... Despite being unable to accurately predict when and where tornadoes will happen, surely there must be places in OK that statistically have less tornado activity over time... that is ALL I was suggesting with that commentary. If there is not such places, fine... then all of OK is dangerous with no exception.

The PNW has very few tornadoes by comparison. As does Cali, New Mexico, AZ, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and on and on. And for the most part they all have nice people too. Please let the poster make an informed decision. For instance, if someone wanted to move to Cali, there are about 10 million warnings I would give. Pretty much the same for Oregon and Washington... that doesn't mean that I would say there aren't nice people there.

Lighten up. It was mostly a joke with the "Twister" reference, and as with the best humor, it has/had a bit of truth in it.
 
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Alrighty then. I've never been in a fatal car crash while driving drunk on a winding road at 150mph either. Should I not warn somebody that there is a high possibility of injury or death during a discussion that features a plan or thoughts to do such things? Is that fear-mongering too? I'll answer... of course not! Personal experience has no bearing on the subject.

But to use your own logic, I'll continue to give out the warning due to the personal experiences of close friends and relatives that live, work, and have answered the call for assistance/help for weeks away from home as EMTs during a tornado disaster/tragedy. And due to living on earth for 67yrs and being aware that the middle states are a kind of tornado alley where cold fronts meet wet/hot/humid fronts and violent weather occurs on a regular basis. It's a fact that you cannot deny.

Please don't be so sensitive/defensive... I wasn't attacking or badmouthing your state. But the facts are, that they have tornadoes (sp?) there and not in other states that are just as nice to live. Note that I didn't attack the people, the politics, the real estate, the fishing or hunting, the music stars, or anything else but gave a warning about the frequency of tornadoes. Tho I'm curious as to why the movie "Twister" is not a good example when I've watched 100 dozen stormchaser vids that seemed not much diff exept for the silliness of surviving in a wellhouse or whatever it was. I did NOT say don't move there. Would YOU say "Yeah, move there, it's great, nothing to worry about there, shoot they don't even have water moccasins!" Shhhh, let's not mention tornadoes... ever!!!

My kids say that there has only ever been one tornado that hit Bentonville despite living in a tornado prone area and tornadoes traveling in close proximity quite often, nobody knows why they don't get hit, but they don't... are you suggesting that they are lying, incorrect, and that places like that don't exist?... Despite being unable to accurately predict when and where tornadoes will happen, surely there must be places in OK that statistically have less tornado activity over time... that is ALL I was suggesting with that commentary. If there is not such places, fine... then all of OK is dangerous with no exception.

The PNW has very few tornadoes by comparison. As does Cali, New Mexico, AZ, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and on and on. And for the most part they all have nice people too. Please let the poster make an informed decision. For instance, if someone wanted to move to Cali, there are about 10 million warnings I would give. Pretty much the same for Oregon and Washington... that doesn't mean that I would say there aren't nice people there.

Lighten up. It was mostly a joke with the "Twister" reference, and as with the best humor, it has/had a bit of truth in it.
OK I will own the fact that I got a little defensive of the state that I consider "home". However, it's like when people say, "Don't they have lots of Indians in Oklahoma that you need to be afraid of..." Nobody gets scalped. Very few people will experience a tornado first hand even if living in Oklahoma their entire life...it's all a matter of probability. Yes, you are obviously correct that the Midwest receives more than their fair share of severe weather and tornadoes due to the prevailing climate and geography. I was under the apparent misconception that you were suggesting that by living, say within a certain 150 mile radius versus another small area that one was more likely to get swept away by repetitive tornadoes. You do have about 8 more years living experience than I do, but I don't really think that matters. With 30 years in central and NE Oklahoma, I was never once swept away by a tornado...true story!
 
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You do have about 8 more years living experience than I do, but I don't really think that matters.

Well, it only matters as a reply to your demand that I not comment unless I have personal experience in OK. I would have to be really really stupid not to be aware of tornado alley etc after living 67yrs was my point. Personal experience is not necessary to be aware of a risk was my point.

I would say that most people that live in Calif have never been killed by an earthquake either. Yet, it's an identifiable risk factor. Living near Mt. Hood, Sisters, Rainier, St. Helens, Yellowstone, are all identifiable risk factors too, no matter how remote the risk. Surely you aren't suggesting we hide our heads in the sand and not evaluate such things when we know about them?

I would say that most people are never robbed, assaulted, raped, or killed either... but I still carry and have a zillion guns in my quiet rural home.

IMO the remoteness of a risk is no reason not to be informed about it. Just sayin'.

You seem like a good person... again, it was not my intent to attack your state or the people in it... although I do like Missouri better... :p;):D
 
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330px-Tornado_Alley_Diagram.svg.png
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it's like when people say, "Don't they have lots of Indians in Oklahoma that you need to be afraid of..." Nobody gets scalped.

True story... I lived in Pinetop at the Indian owned RV park while working for a friend on a lumber mill at the White Mountain Apache reservation. I didn't get scalped either. But I was warned by the bosses that had been working there all year that I was not to wander off by myself, as the Apache males there supposedly hate the white man and that several white men have disappeared. And that the Apache men all carry knives.

I did notice more than a few knives. I also noted a lot of harsh stares from Native men. But the warnings... were they just stories with no merit?... IDK... a few Apache men told me the same thing... maybe just dicking with me but I didn't want to find out!! :)
 
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I guess we (or I) will just have to agree to disagree. There's about twenty-five states on that map above that should be avoided by your logic. But that's a good thing, that you can ascribe to your logic and me to mine. Take for instance my decision to ride motorcycles and once upon a time, ride them on road racing tracks. I accepted and accept that risk as reasonable for me and don't make a big deal about it even though almost every non-rider I have ever met has tried to convince me how dangerous it is.

I do, however believe beyond a shadow of a doubt that you know way more about guns than me and that's why I will continue to respect your opinion and others on this forum. Photo from circa 2012...in Oklahoma!
B- 366 (3).jpg
 

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