Advertise on Northwest Firearms
Gun Deals
Southwest Firearms
Simply Triggers
Defensive Arts
Oregon Rifleworks
Sporting Systems
HighLine Firearms
Low Price Guns
J&B Firearm Sales
Oregon Arms & Ammunition
Buster Beaver Cerakote

washagonian

Messages
430
Reactions
617
Optics neophyte here.
Old eyes.
I'm starting to research small monoculars.
Use would be for target shooting (probably max is 100 yards) and outdoor activity (kayaking and hiking).
Because I know nothing, I would appreciate some suggestions of products to research.
Looking for the best quality for $100 or less.
I know that you get what you pay for, but my needs are simple and not mission critical - so looking for inexpensive device.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks.
 

K-22

Messages
639
Reactions
602
Optics neophyte here.
Old eyes.
I'm starting to research small monoculars.
Use would be for target shooting (probably max is 100 yards) and outdoor activity (kayaking and hiking).
Because I know nothing, I would appreciate some suggestions of products to research.
Looking for the best quality for $100 or less.
I know that you get what you pay for, but my needs are simple and not mission critical - so looking for inexpensive device.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Thanks.

I Would suggest binoculars rather than a monocular.
$100 glass would pretty much be a waste of $$.
If you want something for looking at targets at 100 yd, you would do much better with a spotting scope.
If you would like general purpose optics, take a look at the Nikon Monarch 5 series.
$250–$295.
At that price point, they are amazing. I have a pair I have schlepped through many countries. If I recall, they weigh in at about 21 oz.
if you would like optics reviews, go to Birdforums, and The Audubon site.
You can find a lot of reviews online. Binocs, to Birders, are like firearms to shooters.
Best,
Gary
 

washagonian

Messages
430
Reactions
617
I Would suggest binoculars rather than a monocular.
$100 glass would pretty much be a waste of $$.
If you want something for looking at targets at 100 yd, you would do much better with a spotting scope.
If you would like general purpose optics, take a look at the Nikon Monarch 5 series.
$250–$295.
At that price point, they are amazing. I have a pair I have schlepped through many countries. If I recall, they weigh in at about 21 oz.
if you would like optics reviews, go to Birdforums, and The Audubon site.
You can find a lot of reviews online. Binocs, to Birders, are like firearms to shooters.
Best,
Gary
Thanks Gary.
 

thorborg

Messages
2,379
Reactions
5,366
If you are not steady, something to think about, I cannot see much over 8 power any more with hand held things, binoc or monoc. (I personally dont care monoculars) I especially like the western where the guy is scanning the horizon on the back of a horse no less. unless it was a one X, I doubt he could see anything.
I have a 10 power crystal clear fairly expensive binocular I cant hold still enough to zero in on things without holding it against something. Even then its tricky. suxs being old. Except for maybe bench resting, tripods are a real hassle.
My advice is to go somewhere like sportsman (the bigger the store the better for distance) try several types, styles, powers in the store to see what will work for you before you decide on price, magnification, type and style.
 

K-22

Messages
639
Reactions
602
If you are not steady, something to think about, I cannot see much over 8 power any more with hand held things, binoc or monoc. (I personally dont care monoculars) I especially like the western where the guy is scanning the horizon on the back of a horse no less. unless it was a one X, I doubt he could see anything.
I have a 10 power crystal clear fairly expensive binocular I cant hold still enough to zero in on things without holding it against something. Even then its tricky. suxs being old. Except for maybe bench resting, tripods are a real hassle.
My advice is to go somewhere like sportsman (the bigger the store the better for distance) try several types, styles, powers in the store to see what will work for you before you decide on price, magnification, type and style.

I forgot to mention, if you go to the Audubon store ,off Cornell Rd, you can try different binocs in a woodsy setting. However, their prices are higher than many other suppliers.
And, while there, do not, bring up the subject of guns, or hunting.
And what thorburg said, “see what works for you”
Best,
Gary
 

washagonian

Messages
430
Reactions
617
If you are not steady, something to think about, I cannot see much over 8 power any more with hand held things, binoc or monoc. (I personally dont care monoculars) I especially like the western where the guy is scanning the horizon on the back of a horse no less. unless it was a one X, I doubt he could see anything.
I have a 10 power crystal clear fairly expensive binocular I cant hold still enough to zero in on things without holding it against something. Even then its tricky. suxs being old. Except for maybe bench resting, tripods are a real hassle.
My advice is to go somewhere like sportsman (the bigger the store the better for distance) try several types, styles, powers in the store to see what will work for you before you decide on price, magnification, type and style.
Thanks for some excellent pieces of advice based on your experience - especially being aware of the degree of magnification and having a steady enough hand to zero in on what you're looking at. I'm going to be by Sportsman's tomorrow, will go in and try things out.
 

K-22

Messages
639
Reactions
602
Thanks for some excellent pieces of advice based on your experience - especially being aware of the degree of magnification and having a steady enough hand to zero in on what you're looking at. I'm going to be by Sportsman's tomorrow, will go in and try things out.

One more little detail. Be sure to focus the Binocs for your eyes. Close right eye, and focus , using the central focus wheel, on something about 100 feet away. (Something with sharp detail or straight lines is good)
Then close the left eye, and using the diopter adjustment, focus the right barrel for the right eye,
If you usually wear glasses, other than reading glasses, you will want to have your glasses on. You will want to adjust the eycups of the binoculars to accommodate you, and your eyeglasses.
This will all be new to you, so take your time, and do not feel bad if you feel a little fumble fingered.
Been there, done that.
Best,
Gary
 

washagonian

Messages
430
Reactions
617
One more little detail. Be sure to focus the Binocs for your eyes. Close right eye, and focus , using the central focus wheel, on something about 100 feet away. (Something with sharp detail or straight lines is good)
Then close the left eye, and using the diopter adjustment, focus the right barrel for the right eye,
If you usually wear glasses, other than reading glasses, you will want to have your glasses on. You will want to adjust the eycups of the binoculars to accommodate you, and your eyeglasses.
This will all be new to you, so take your time, and do not feel bad if you feel a little fumble fingered.
Been there, done that.
Best,
Gary
Thanks Gary - you've been a lot of help to someone who knows practically zip about optics (e.g., me).:D
 
Southwest Firearms Forum
Cerberus Training Group
Project Appleseed
Copeland Custom Gunworks
Oregon Arms & Ammunition
Sporting Systems
NW Custom Firearms
Advertise on Northwest Firearms

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Top Bottom