Mossberg 590A1 - a War Shotgun

Messages
7
Reactions
12
mossberg-590a1.jpg
Came across this write up on the Mossberg 590A1 from Frank Jardim.

If you do your bird hunting with a classic Mossberg 500 shotgun, you might be taken aback when you first handle their tactically oriented, nine-shot, bayonet-lug- and aperture-sight-equipped Magpul series Model 590A1. For starters, the 590A1 is built for war, not sport, and the Magpul series takes it a step beyond with furniture that enhances its tactical function and allows for more user customization than the standard military stock. Whether you’re repelled by it or drawn to it, you have to admit: it’s a sexy beast. At nearly 8.5 pounds empty, I found this model’s weight alone impressive. It’s a load to carry, which means any Marine Corps infantryman issued one will curse it long and loudly, but when it comes time to shoot it, that mass just soaks up the recoil of the heaviest 3-inch magnum loads.
This is a gun you can shoot slugs with all day long. I don’t love this gun, but it’s an apocalypse-grade weapon. If I have to go into battle against a rival warlord or endure decades of chaos after the collapse of civilization with just a shotgun, this is the one I’d want.

FOR THOSE UNFAMILIAR with the 590A1, it is the latest, and possibly final, tactical evolution of Mossberg’s 500 series shotgun line introduced in 1960. The 500 series shotgun is one of the most successful sporting arms in history with over 12 million produced in various gauges and configurations.
The Mossberg 500 in tactical trappings was also very popular with law enforcement, but its most demanding role was serving in the hands of our military service members in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. In fact, the changes that evolved the series 500 into the current 590 and 590A1 tactical shotguns were in response to the military’s requirements.
Though non-NFA versions of the 590A1 with barrels 18.5 inches or longer became available to civilians in 2009, these shotguns are marketed primarily to law enforcement and military agencies. The 590A1 is among the mix of shotgun models and types the military currently uses for interior guard duty, prison security, riot control, door-breaching, boarding hostile naval vessels and front-line combat roles.

However, in the big picture, the shotgun is a specialty weapon and makes up a very tiny percentage of our military small arms inventory. Shotguns have served our troops most famously in the trenches of World War I, and the jungle fighting in the Pacific Theater in World War II and the Vietnam War, but always in small numbers. Unlike military service rifles, which are designed as combat arms from the first blueprint, shotguns and their ammunition were always selected and procured from normal civilian commercial sources, sometimes with no modifications whatsoever, other than the addition of martial markings.

aiming-Mossberg590a1.jpg

GETTING BACK TO the specific tactical adaptions of the Mossberg shotguns, the principal difference between the 500 and 590 was the design of the magazine tube and barrel mounting. The former’s magazine tube is closed at the end with a threaded hole in the center to attach the barrel. The latter uses an open-ended magazine tube with exterior threads and holds the barrel in place with a screw-on cap.
This made the 590’s magazine much easier to clean. That wasn’t a big deal for most American hunters, but it was for airmen, soldiers and marines, who tended to get a lot of sand and dust in their guns doing their duty during the Gulf Wars and the Global War on Terrorism. The 590A1 differs from the 590 in the thickness of its barrel and its use of aluminum, rather than polymer, for the triggerguard assembly and safety. It doesn’t take too much to dent a shotgun barrel, and the U.S. Navy requested a heavier barrel that was more resistant to denting after observing guns were sometimes damaged banging into ship hatchways.
Read the rest of Mossberg 5091 Magpul here.
 
Messages
1,799
Reactions
1,057
When we deployed to Afghanistan, our unit (B Co, SECFOR, 2-162 Infantry, 41st Brigade OR Army National Guard) got some brand new 5 shot 590A1’s. We put the pistol grips on them and they were supposed to be for breaching. They ended up being chow hall guns and secondaries when the SAW gunner had to leave the SAW M249 in the tower. We also used them for warning shots during convoys by firing the little flare rounds. That actually worked well. When we got back, they looked like hell, but withstood the abuse just fine. :)
 

s1xty7

Messages
276
Reactions
745
I've been trying to talk myself out of getting a 590A1 with marinecote. I already have a 500, so it's not really needed. But, I think I've already resigned myself to finally buying one if they are ever in stock again. Great shotgun!
 

Cosimel

Messages
196
Reactions
531
I used part of my 'stimulus' check to purchase a 590 Tactical from Northwest Armory on April 15th. I wanted a 590A1, but simply couldn't find one. I do feel I lucked out all the same since the 9-round 590 I was able to find is a 'new for 2020' model and the only 590 currently offered with a 'Accu-Choke' equipped barrel. I call it 'The Beast' :)

Mossberg 590 Tactical-4.JPG
 
Had a 590A1 with ghost ring once, sold to a member. I liked it way better than 870 express. Now 930 SPX 9+1 is on watch.
I used part of my 'stimulus' check to purchase a 590 Tactical from Northwest Armory on April 15th. I wanted a 590A1, but simply couldn't find one. I do feel I lucked out all the same since the 9-round 590 I was able to find is a 'new for 2020' model and the only 590 currently offered with a 'Accu-Choke' equipped barrel. I call it 'The Beast' :)

View attachment 709222

89D525DC-BA26-4F6F-B5F4-887C714C3FD2.jpeg


My M930 is my primary HD shotgun... 7+1+1 rounds of 00-buck and/or slugs (ghost loaded) in an 18.5” barreled BOOM stick, just as fast as you can pull the trigger... :s0155:
 

Pete F

Messages
1,157
Reactions
2,019
  • Autobiographer
  • Woke Up Like This
  • National Rifle Association
  • Oregon Firearms Federation
I'll stick with my 500A1 with the heavy barrel and 5+1. I would like to have a few more rounds in the tube, but the receiver ammo mount holds 6 more.

@Stomper 's M930 would be my only other choice.

I do have a Winchester Model 1912, made by Browning, humpback 16 gauge that is rusty on the left side but smooth action and no rust on the inside.The wood is in great shape other than being grimy. It must have been left on a damp surface for an extended period. I was thinking about making it into a bada$$ riot shotgun. I just need to refinish, shorten the barrel to 18.5 inches and find an extended tube. The 16 gauge is a nice compromise between 20 and 12 gauge. I have seen 00 buck in 16 gauge lately for reasonable prices (Fiocchi?). Anyone have leads or a gunsmith that can do the extension and shorten the barrel?
 

etrain16

Messages
16,505
Reactions
61,416
  • National Rifle Association
  • Fight For Your Right
  • Meet & Greet
  • Outdoor Cleanup - 2017
Need to put something on that rail !!!
I've got a few available optics to throw up there. Don't really need them in the house though, no real long shots anywhere and the rail lines up well with the front site. Bigger priority is to get another light on it, the last one died on me (not an expensive model), then I'll worry a bit more about an optic.
 

MechaNik

Messages
1,197
Reactions
2,709
  • National Rifle Association
  • Oregon Firearms Federation
  • Second Amendment Foundation
  • Gun Owners of America
I have a hard time believing the 590 series is functionally any better than the 500 series. Heavier and "tougher" maybe.... but both of my 500s have yet to leave me wanting. Correct me if I'm wrong (please do, I want to know) but aren't most parts interchangable between the series?
 

etrain16

Messages
16,505
Reactions
61,416
  • National Rifle Association
  • Fight For Your Right
  • Meet & Greet
  • Outdoor Cleanup - 2017
I have a hard time believing the 590 series is functionally any better than the 500 series. Heavier and "tougher" maybe.... but both of my 500s have yet to leave me wanting. Correct me if I'm wrong (please do, I want to know) but aren't most parts interchangable between the series?
My understanding is that most parts are. Barrels are not. The 590 has metal trigger components and safety, where the 500 uses plastic. But as @Stomper noted, you can swap those out on a 500 with the metal components if you want.
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Arms Collectors of SW Washington Gun Show
Battleground Community Center
912 E Main St, Battle Ground, WA 98604, USA
Cerberus Training Group - Run the Gun Pistol
Cerberus Training Group
47 Cattle Dr, Goldendale, WA 98620, USA
Cerberus Training Group - Run the Gun Rifle
Cerberus Training Group
47 Cattle Dr, Goldendale, WA 98620, USA

LATEST RESOURCE REVIEWS

  • Oregon Arms & Ammunition
    5.00 star(s)
    Hellcat OSP
    I almost put "Limited "Covid induced" inventory" as a Con, but thought that wouldn't really be fair to them! The aftermath of Covid has depleted...
  • Vancouver Weapon Werx
    5.00 star(s)
    I have done a lot of deals here
    Gary's easy to work with when in town.
    • matts
  • Vancouver Weapon Werx
    5.00 star(s)
    Excellent Business!
    I have been going to Vancouver Weapon Werx for years and know both owners quite well. The only downfall is I go there to purchase or have a gun...
  • SafeFire Indoor Shooting Range & Retail
    5.00 star(s)
    A great, safe place to go shooting
    Love this place!! Great staff, the range masters are friendly, helpful and alert. This is a safe place to shoot. The store is kind of low on stock...
    • GWS
  • Copeland Custom Gunworks
    5.00 star(s)
    First time....
    First time working with a gunsmith but I found Copeland Gunworks to be an awesome husband wife team that worked really fast and things were...
Top Bottom