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Mil-Dot Reticle, 1/4 MOA Elevation/Windage adjusters

Discussion in 'Gear & Accessories' started by JedB, Mar 11, 2013.

  1. JedB

    JedB PDX Active Member

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    Hi All,

    I have a scope that has a Mil Dot reticle, but has the adjustments for windage/elevation in 1/4 MOA.

    Simple scenario:
    Target is at 100yds.
    Focus the scope at the bullseye.
    BANG, I'm 2 inches to the right of the target center, level with the center. (i.e. no elevation gained/lost)

    What would the adjustment be? 8 clicks total to the left?
    Do I need to do some form of calculation incorporating the Mil Dot?

    Does the MilDot reticle influence my adjustment (in MOA) in any way?

    Second scenario:
    Target is at 100yds.
    Focus the scope at the bullseye.
    BANG, I'm 2 inches above the target center. (i.e. no left/right)

    What would the adjustment be? 8 clicks total downward?
    Do I need to do some form of calculation incorporating the Mil Dot?

    Maybe I'm over thinking this, as i've been reading ranging formulas for the past hour. :p

    Thank you in advance.
    Jed
     
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  2. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    Are you trying to zero your scope or adjust for a crosswind?

    Having a Mil-Dot reticule will not affect how the scope is adjusted when you're zeroing your scope. The mil-dot aids in making shots after the scope is zero'ed and will help you adjust for cross winds and different distances as well as range targets. The adjustment's you've listed above are correct for zero'ing a scope with 1/4 MOA clicks. The manual you got with your scope should lay out the procedure and if not, I am sure you'd be able to find a video on YouTube.
     
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  3. JedB

    JedB PDX Active Member

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    Hello Diesel Scout,

    There was no manual, as I got it from a friend. I am attempting to zero the scope.

    If i read your comment correctly, the adjustments (MOA) have nothing to do with the reticle (Mil) so I can use the MOA based calculations as above.

    Thank you!!
     
  4. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you are correctly zero'ing the scope using the click adjustments. It maybe very worth while to get a manual for the scope, depending on who made it you can probably download the manual for it offline, or call them and have them send one to you. If it's a cheaper brand (nothing wrong with being cheap) you maybe SOL.
     
  5. JedB

    JedB PDX Active Member

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    Thank you for your reply.
    I've downloaded the manual (Leupold) and am reading through it.

    Thanks again!
     
  6. Tim K

    Tim K Colorado Member

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    The marks on the reticle are used for a number of purposes like range estimation and wind holds.

    Precision shooters have wind drift data for various ranges showing how much to hold off the target in mil rads or MOA. The process is roughly to estimate wind speed, look up the amount of drift at the proper range, and then hold off that amount. The data might show that at 500 yards you need to hold 1.2 mil rads of wind. The dots on the reticle are used to help hold the correct windage.

    The click value on your turrets is totally independent of the reticle.

    The problem with a mixed reticle/click value as you have comes when you don't know the size of your target. Lets say you shoot at a target of unknown size. You can see your hit, but are unable to guess how far off center you are because you don't know the size of the target. The reticle is usually used to measure the distance between your aim point and where the bullet actually struck. Say you strike 2mils rads low. You'd like to adjust your scope up two mils to compensate. If the clicks are also in mils, it's simple. Just dial up another 2 mils. If your clicks are in MOA, you have to convert 2 mils to MOA to know how many clicks are required to get on target.

    If you generate dope for your gun with one of the computer simulations, just tell the program to output drop in MOA so you can dial for distance and mils for wind so you can hold for wind.
     
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