Med and eatable plants

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Sabertooth, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. Sabertooth

    Sabertooth
    Josephine County
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  2. lowly monk

    lowly monk
    Beaverton, Oregon.
    Just a guy. Bronze Supporter

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  3. Spielmannsfluch

    Spielmannsfluch
    Oregon City
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    This book saved me hundreds of dollars. After realizing how much food I have in my backyard, I stopped at only a six month supply of rice and grains. That acre of stinging nettle, young ferns, cat tails and dandelions means fresh greens 10 months a year...
     
    Taku and (deleted member) like this.
  4. sheepdip

    sheepdip
    Redland
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    YUK!!!


     
  5. Spielmannsfluch

    Spielmannsfluch
    Oregon City
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    Stinging nettle makes a surprisingly good tea.
     
  6. sheepdip

    sheepdip
    Redland
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    TEA?, YUK!!!
     
  7. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    Now people are getting smart.
    You can only carry so much on your back.
    The rest is out there ready.
    There is no reason anyone should ever go hungry in this part of the world.
    Nearly every insect is also edible and some don't tase so bad, once they get past the eyes.
     
  8. Spielmannsfluch

    Spielmannsfluch
    Oregon City
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    I have a moist area in mostly shade where I started burying the remnants of Safeway green onions a couple years ago. Those things keep growing and now I am getting an infestation of "wild" green onions in my backyard.
     

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