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I work for a little fried pie stand, and I was thinking that maybe some more hearty pies would bring more people out in the cold. As the weather gets worse, a lot less people come out to our cart and I'm starting to go broke. Either way, I figured you all like hearty food and there seem to be some good cooks here (Trlsman, your input would be much appreciated), so maybe you could tell me what's right and what's wrong with my recipe.

Keep in mind, this will be $4 and in a hand-size fried pie.

Leg of lamb
1 bunch each carrots and celery
2 onions
2 tbsp minced garlic
1 sprig each thyme and rosemary
2 bay leaves
1 bottle red wine (port would be good, but any works)
1 bottle beer (optional, if it's laying around)
8 qt vegetable stock
Flour and oil for roux
Salt and pepper

Dice 1/2 of the vegetables, and rough chop the other 1/2. Rub the lamb with salt and pepper, and place in a deep 1/2 pan. Add the rough chopped veg, thyme, and rosemary. Add wine and beer, then add vegetable stock to almost cover. Cover pan with foil.

Place in slow cooker at 250 degrees for 12 hours.

Remove the meat from the pan, and strain and save the liquid. Puree the vegetable matter in the Robot Coupe and save. Chop and pull the lamb into pieces small enough for pies.

Sweat the diced veg and garlic in oil on medium heat until the onions look clear. Add remaining vegetable stock, lamb, lamb pan juice, bay leaves, and pureed vegetables and bring to a boil, then simmer.

Add roux until desired thickness is reached.

I know, no mashed potatoes, but with the pie dough I think it would be too starchy. Also, there may be pictures in days to come.

Thanks for your input on a weird topic,
Jordan
 
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$4 for all those ingredients is a serious bargain! I'd definitely be stopping buy to chow on a couple of those!

That recipe sounds fantastic though, I'll be needing many samples for uh, um, research purposes! :p

My favorite style of lamb recipes tend to be Greek style preparations, I really am no expert on preparing Lamb though.
 

Siglvr

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I work for a little fried pie stand, and I was thinking that maybe some more hearty pies would bring more people out in the cold. As the weather gets worse, a lot less people come out to our cart and I'm starting to go broke. Either way, I figured you all like hearty food and there seem to be some good cooks here (Trlsman, your input would be much appreciated), so maybe you could tell me what's right and what's wrong with my recipe.

Keep in mind, this will be $4 and in a hand-size fried pie.
.........

Thanks for your input on a weird topic,
Jordan

That sounds good. Not calling it a pie though. Tradition around here is that a pie is desert. Pumpkin pie, apple pie, etc. I'd call it something else or folks looking for dinner would walk right past.

Good luck!
 
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If this is some kind of a hot pocket type of pie it sounds like a real good deal. Let me know where you are at and I'll be stoppin' by.

Keith
 

BWH

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That sounds good. Not calling it a pie though. Tradition around here is that a pie is desert. Pumpkin pie, apple pie, etc. I'd call it something else or folks looking for dinner would walk right past.

Good luck!

I've heard those refered to as "Pasties" more of an english item if I recall.
 
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I've heard those refered to as "Pasties" more of an english item if I recall.
These days, in the US, a pasty (with a short 'a') is usually only seen in Pennsylvania (and my kitchen :) ). Most folks in the rest of the US have never heard of them. It is a calzone sized meal made with a browned ground hamburger, boiled potato cubes, onions, and parsley baked in dough. The coal miners would take one when they went to work in the morning and it would last all day.

So...back to the OP. Where is your cart at? We wanna come and get some :) ?

Keith
 
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These days, in the US, a pasty (with a short 'a') is usually only seen in Pennsylvania (and my kitchen :) ). Most folks in the rest of the US have never heard of them. It is a calzone sized meal made with a browned ground hamburger, boiled potato cubes, onions, and parsley baked in dough. The coal miners would take one when they went to work in the morning and it would last all day.

So...back to the OP. Where is your cart at? We wanna come and get some :) ?

Keith

That sounds similar to a Knish or a Pierogi too.
 
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Ya gotta put that "cultural spin" on it. It's a marketing thing:
Pites (pan-sized pies) and pitakia (small pies) are some of the most famous dishes in Greece. Thick and thin phyllo (filo) dough can either be used as layers of crust or wrapped around individual bites of tasty cheeses, greens, vegetables, or combinations.
From: <broken link removed>

Pierogi or knish or pasties might work too. Remember that the Greeks eat A LOT of greens, especially leafy greens though. And you might want to offer a yogurt based dipping sauce to with that.
Just a (few)thought(s).
 
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Ya gotta put that "cultural spin" on it. It's a marketing thing:
From: <broken link removed>

Pierogi or knish or pasties might work too. Remember that the Greeks eat A LOT of greens, especially leafy greens though. And you might want to offer a yogurt based dipping sauce to with that.
Just a (few)thought(s).

Excellent suggestion!
 
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