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i wanna be a gunsmith

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by gunslinger1911, Mar 7, 2011.

  1. gunslinger1911

    gunslinger1911 WA state Member

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    Been doing all my own work for a while now on a short list of pistols and rifles...I want to learn more! Anyone have a shop where i could help out a little? Maybe let me push a broom around and learn some tricks of the trade? I work hard and learn fast and would be an asset to anyone that would take me in! Is there a Gunsmith school around here anywhere??? :D
     
  2. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    the best one is in Colorado.
     
  3. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    The best two are in Colorado. Colorado School of Trades and Trinidad. Trinidad has been getting consistently better over the years. CST seems to yo-yo between excellent and just good.

    Get your training there and you'll be ready to apprentice with an experienced smith. Only had a few friends go straight from school to their own shop. Only know of one who's been relatively successful. The rest closed up and went to work for other established shops.
     
  4. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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  5. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    Gunslinger-

    Are you a disabled Veteran with a rating of over 30%?

    SF-
     
  6. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills Cave Creek, Arizony Well-Known Member

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    Funny cause I never heard of no Gunsmith License before?
     
  7. gunslinger1911

    gunslinger1911 WA state Member

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    no?

    ...and thank you to everyone who responded...i will be sure to follow up on these leads :D
     
  8. HollisOR

    HollisOR Rural OR, South of Dallas Active Member

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    2X,

    There are associations. The American Gunsmithing Association. A good place to ask is the people at Brownells. Also a piece of paper is just that. The quality of work speaks for it self. There are videos and classes, pros and cons to all of them. There are general gunsmiths and specialty gunsmiths. There are some that are Machinists, a very good skill to have. Specializing is the easiest route to go, but work may be slim at first.

    There are people who will take your money. Also you need to asses your skills and abilities.
     
  9. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    Gunslinger-

    I only asked because the VA VOC REHAB will pay for the enhanced master gunsmith program from AGI. There is a wealth of knowledge, tools and reference material you get in the deal. I am in the same boat you are in and I will give you some tips.

    1. your age. If you are under 30 you will have some challenges. Some guy who is 40+ with a high dollar firearm will be reluctant in dropping off his baby with you.

    2. machining, lathe, refinishing (metal and wood), welding, grinding, filing all require motor skills of the hands. Pick one to learn and then move onto another. You literally need to train your hands.

    3. Read books. There are many references out there and just like auto mechanics you can't remember all the ins and outs of each firearm. You need books and as cheesy as it sounds get a book on firearm disassembly, pick a firearm and learn how to disassemble it yourself. If you don't have the firearm, but a used one and follow the directions. EDIT: confidence of your own skills is very important. You need to learn to tame that nasty inner voice of lack-of-confidence. If you are nervous about it your customers will be nervous too. Its O.K. to loose a spring, get used to it all the gunsmiths have lost springs, just be prepared to replace it or spend time really looking for it. Hint: extendable magnet wands from Harbor freight will be your friend.

    4. Start budgeting and buying gunsmith tools. If you found a smith to apprentice with he will be most impressed if you have at least your own basic tools. I am thinking under $300.00 will get you started. EDIT 2.0: If you are serious about this, start looking at your monthly finances and budgeting for accordingly. If you have a $60.00 a week smoking habit maybe its time to quit.

    5. Learn a sub-project of gunsmithing and hone in on it. For example: wood stock refinishing. Who does it anymore? The old timers are fading out (very sad but true) and the new guys are only around plastic. Checkering is another.

    6. Keep pictures of everything you work on. They will speak volumes of your work and you can go back and see how you progressed.

    I've been doing an 'internship' at South Ridge Arms for awhile now and I've learned a lot but it isn't a drop in the bucket for what I want to learn. I've been into firearms since I was 17 and am 40 now and have quite a collection and have worked the gunshows for years with 23 years in the National Guard, I still don't know enough. ALso there is the whole running a small business aspect (learn quickbooks if you go at it alone) too.

    If you want, PM me your email address and I can recommend you some very basic tools you will want to get to make fewer mistakes than I did.

    SF-
     
  10. HollisOR

    HollisOR Rural OR, South of Dallas Active Member

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    Silver Fox, well said. IMHO, specializing helps to acquire the skills faster. Doing everything, is a endless study.
     
  11. buick455

    buick455 se portland Member

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    Do you want to be a gunsmith as a job or a hobby? If you don't see gunsmithing as a fruitful career then my sugestion would be to look into the Machinist classes at you local community college. Because you will learn how to run a mill and lathe, while also using precision measuring tools. And while the job market seems like there are no jobs available most people miss that there are many manufacturing facilities that have rec's out for skilled machinist and can't fill the openings ( trust me I know I'm in the business )

    If you become a good manual machinist then gunsmithing is about tayloring you skills to specific tasks like hand fitting barrels and bedding stocks.