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Filthy Pyrodex Cases

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by RobertJ., Jan 10, 2010.

  1. RobertJ.

    RobertJ. Seaside, OR Member

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    A friend of mine recently shot about 50 rounds through his Blackhawk .45 Colt. He had loaded them with Pyrodex, to try to get that old west effect. Now, these blackened cases seem impossible to clean, even after 8 hours in a tumbler, they're still black. Anyone else experienced this? How did you clean your cases? Thanks, any help will be appreciated!
     
  2. PDXGS

    PDXGS Aloha... yes, Aloha, Oregon Member

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  3. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    What are you using in the tumbler for media and any additive?

    I'm a real believer in using walnut shell for dirty cases, and adding an automotive fine abrasive. You can buy abrasive liquids (polishes) at auto body paint suppliers which are water based - no synthetic polishes or waxes in them. Body shops have to have that so that they can paint over the polished (buffed) paint in multi-coat operations. They also can't be contaminating their paint prep and paint areas with junk like silicone. I don't want any synthetics in my cases when I'm finished.

    You can get the polishes in various grits, with one called "Black Magic" being a very fine "final finish." It's called Black Magic because black paint is the hardest to polish without leaving swirl marks. Black paint shows every imperfection. If you don't find that brand, they will still have a "final" finish polish that's very good.

    I start with walnut and a medium grit polish (a couple of tablespoons only) and then switch to corncob and Black Magic.

    I can't say that this would clean your cases due to the exact issue you're having. I can say not to use a brass polish (furniture polish department) because everything I've read says it weakens the brass. Maybe that's wrong but I take no chances.

    I can't say about ultrasonic cleaners such as Harbor Freight because I've never used one.

    $.02
     
  4. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Robert, I forgot to mention that there is a big difference between anything that hints that it's a "rubbing compound" or a "polishing compound." The first is coarse for smoothing or aggressively cleaning. The latter is the true fine polish. I just went out to my shelf and looked and got reminded, LOL. Either can be water based or contain junk so we always need to read the label or ask. I start with walnut and water based rubbing compound of some sort. Right now it's 3M water based "heavy duty rubbing compound" in a quart squeeze bottle, bought at an auto paint supplier a long time ago. It's shelf life is forever - just shake it up well. It's just abrasive and water. You can even add a touch of water if it ever gets too thick.
     
  5. RobertJ.

    RobertJ. Seaside, OR Member

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    Gunner, thank you for the quick reply. My friend Kip, who is experiencing this, uses walnut shell, but neither one of us considered an additive. Thanks again!
     
  6. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Welcome. Can't promise it will work for your issue, but good luck. :thumbup: