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So I'm starting to put together my reloading setup and was hoping some folks here could double-check that I'm not missing anything major for reloading .223. The list (with pictures) is as follows

Hornady Lock-N-Load Classic Single Stage Press Kit (Comes with powder drop, scale, hand primer, case lube, reloading manual, chamfering and deburring tool, and a few other things)
Hornady Cam-Lock Case Trimmer Kit
2.5lb Steel brass cleaning media
Frankford Arsenal Rotary Case Tumbler lite
Speer Bullets 22 caliber (224 Diameter) 55 grain spitzer ( This was what was available and inexpensive for plinking)
Hodgon H335 Smokeless Powder
Hornady 2 die rifle set

Only things missing are:
Shell holders
Small rifle primers (for obvious reasons)

dies.png reloading-gear.png
 

oremike

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That looks like a good set up to start with, once you get started don't be supprized if there are other things you'll want to add but you should pretty much be able to make some ammo with that. Well you might want some cases as well.;)
 
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That looks like a good set up to start with, once you get started don't be supprized if there are other things you'll want to add but you should pretty much mack some ammo with that. Well you might want some cases as well.;)
Lol true on the cases. I can make some cases empty pretty quick if need be ;)
 

Moeca

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Should be good to go with that set up. A couple things to look into i can think of for ease. A digital scale i personal hate beam scales but the do work. I just lack the patience most days. I'd maybe suggest a case gauge such as Lymans headspace/case length. Found it makes die set up easier and easy to check length. Last would be a Lee factory crimp die found it is easy to set and use. None of these are necessities to get going but can make getting started easier.
 
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Should be good to go with that set up. A couple things to look into i can think of for ease. A digital scale i personal hate beam scales but the do work. I just lack the patience most days. I'd maybe suggest a case gauge such as Lymans headspace/case length. Found it makes die set up easier and easy to check length. Last would be a Lee factory crimp die found it is easy to set and use. None of these are necessities to get going but can make getting started easier.

Cool thanks for the suggestions
 
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Should be good to go with that set up. A couple things to look into i can think of for ease. A digital scale i personal hate beam scales but the do work. I just lack the patience most days. I'd maybe suggest a case gauge such as Lymans headspace/case length. Found it makes die set up easier and easy to check length. Last would be a Lee factory crimp die found it is easy to set and use. None of these are necessities to get going but can make getting started easier.

I grew up on a balance beam and like them, though I too use a digital scale now and finally got one of those automated powder measures, but that's not the point I'm trying to make.

There is one issue with manual digital scales that you don't have with balance beams: it is possible to make a mistake in measuring because there is no cue for when you're at the right weight. You might be measuring 6.8 gr for a pistol and at some point have a brain fart and start doing 8.6, which could be bad. With a balance beam you set the weight and then make the pointer hit the zero and you can't make that mistake.

You can do the same thing with a digital scale too -- measure out your weight and then press tare so the scale is zeroed when the pan and correct amount of powder is on the scale. Then all you have to do is weigh up to zero, dump powder, repeat.

Maybe this is obvious but I had my digital scale for more than a year before it occurred to me. It keeps my table clear of little scraps of paper with the weight I'm measuring to and I feel safer, being somewhat of a flake and all.
 
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Some way to take care of the primer crimp? All nato brass, and many civilian .223/5.56 cases have crimped primers. Not all civilian, but many IIRC.

And I would say jump straight to the primer pocket machines. They are 100x faster than using a drill and trimmer. The most time consuming part of trimming the pockets is putting each shell into a holder, then removing and repeating. The swager is just a pull of the lever and done.

I tried saving the extra money and going the trimming route. All I got was carpal tunnel and a swager anyway.
 
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The most time consuming part of trimming the pockets is putting each shell into a holder, then removing and repeating.
I have simply held the case in hand and gave the primer pocket one twist with the deburring tool and done!

All you need to do is to take the sharp edge off the crimp with slight chamfer and the primer slides right in!
 
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