Solid Concepts 3d Printed Metal 1911

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by RicInOR, Nov 7, 2013.

  1. RicInOR

    RicInOR
    Washington County
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  2. bnsaibum

    bnsaibum
    Corvallis, OR
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  3. Classic

    Classic
    Federal Way WA
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    Hmmmm This almost makes MIM parts look like quality stuff. My hands and face are worth allot more than a cheap gun.......
     
  4. civilian75

    civilian75
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    Baby steps...
     
  5. DeanfromOregon

    DeanfromOregon
    Wilsonville
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    Oh man we are just so close to printing bacon.....
     
    GuyBMeredith, orygun, simon99 and 7 others like this.
  6. elsie

    elsie
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  7. Soren

    Soren
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    Here's a video. I wish they would have shown some of the 3D printing.

    [video=youtube_share;u7ZYKMBDm4M]http://youtu.be/u7ZYKMBDm4M[/video]
     
  8. Diamondback

    Diamondback
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    It's not about "cheap" so much as "easily made at home and completely untraceable"... :D
     
  9. bnsaibum

    bnsaibum
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    They show a second or two of it at the 35 second mark.
     
  10. Classic

    Classic
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    Don't worry, you're only risking fingers, hands, eye site... :paranoid:
     
  11. Diamondback

    Diamondback
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    Baby steps, tac... this just proves the concept. SLP's for plastic cost that much or more at first too, but today they've dropped in size and price to have household versions for around $500. Who knows where it'll be in just another 2-3 years?
     
  12. Classic

    Classic
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    I's like to see him dump 4 or 5 mags... More than one type of boom would happen!
     
  13. redhippie

    redhippie
    People's republic of PDX
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    They used to say that about computers. Now how many do we have? Me, one desktop, one ipad, one iphone and that doesn't count all the PLCs around the house and car.
     
  14. RicInOR

    RicInOR
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    What I think is likely to happen is some local metal fabrication shops will buy the machine and make the parts you design. You can do this with water jets and the like today.
    The biggest market is still rapid prototyping.
    But also impossible to get parts can be manufactured. If you read Jay Leno (I think he might be on TV also) he talks about making parts for his antique car collection. Used to be very, very difficult. Now he'll be able to print out what he needs.


    Montana has an interesting dust up with the Federal government. Their claim is that if you make all the parts in your state - all of them from the raw material - then the Commerce clause cannot apply and therefore the Federal government (BATFE etc) has no say - no limitations - no authority over them. I am sure the Feds position is "not so fast" which is why that will be in the courts for a while. The implication here is, if you can print the "gun" then you don't need to follow the federal rules. Why not print a suppressor? Why not print a full automatic lower for your AR?

    I too would have liked to see a bit more of the demo of the printing process.

    I agree - baby steps. But how fast they have come.




    The Montana Firearms Freedom Act is an attempt to limit unconstitutional federal intervention over firearms in the state of Montana by using the Necessary and Proper Clause and the Interstate Commerce Clauses of the US Constitution.
    Montana Firearms Freedom Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    Aquila Water Jet Portland
    Aquila's Waterjet Portland, Oregon, OR 97217
     
  15. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg
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    Beat me to it, I posted a 2nd thread
     
  16. tac

    tac
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    Of course, I should have thought about my post. In a country - the only country on earth - where owning a fiream is a right enthroned in the actual founding document of the nation, making a gun by cooking a few tablespoons of metal powder and couple of lazers and a computer is not so much of a big deal. Living in a country, as I do, where making a pressure-bearing part or component of ANY kind of a firearm is comprehensively against the law - UNLESS you are licensed to do so - let alone a complete working firearm like this one.

    I apologise for my facile remark by removing it from the thread.

    tac, suitably chastened.
     
  17. RicInOR

    RicInOR
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  18. tac

    tac
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    Back in the last couple of years of WW2, my dad, a convicted Irish terrorist, and therefore not allowed to join the British Army, was employed as a highly-skilled welder - his other occupation when he wasn't blowing up police stations. He was part of a development team of welding specialists who had invented flame-spraying of metal, using a clockwork mechanism to feed a metal wire or tape into the flame of an Oxy-acetylene torch, where it was atomised and deposited onto the damaged or worn surface to build it up sufficiently for resizing/grinding/machining to the original dimensions. This was VERY useful when it came to filling in shot holes in armour that had been put there by the then-opposition. The process was refined into what is now a fully-commercialised method of renewing crankshafts, pistons, reciprocating parts of all kinds of large engines and so on. It was called the Starlight Process, and the action of using it, back in the days of hand-operated gas-torches and clockwork wire/tape feeders, was called 'painting', from the action used to effectively deposit the new layer - a bit like the action of a spray-gun operator in a body shop.

    Just sayin'.

    tac
     

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