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Sharps cartridge rifle

Discussion in 'Legal & Political Archive' started by MattMaier, Dec 20, 2014.

  1. MattMaier

    MattMaier Washington Member

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    I am planning a build of a Sharps model 1874 rifle chambered in .45 caliber, specifically the .45/110 cartridge. For the record I don't plan on selling or otherwise transferring this rifle once it is built, but I am curious. It would be chambered for a cartridge that the ATF considers obsolete and it is a replica of a firearm made before 1898, but would it be considered a modern firearm since it could theoretically chamber and fire a .45/70 round?
     
  2. Sabertooth

    Sabertooth Josephine County Active Member

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    New black powder cartridge rifles have to shipped like all new rifles. Manufacture to your local gun dealer.
    The action would have to go through a gun dealer if you order it, same as other modern actions. Its a cartridge fire arm, same rules as modern. Muzzle loaders I believe can still be delivered to your front door.
    I located a Sharps 45-120 and will be talking to a local gun dealer to get the paper work needed for shipping it. Its new and the $$$$ is wow. Still thinking but get the info I need just in case.
    Shooting a 45-70 round in a large caliber like a 45-110 is not recommended.
     
  3. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    They are both made from the 45 basic brass and the only difference is the case length and capacity. ie 70 gr black powder vs 120 grains of black powder so why the recommendation to not shoot the 45-70 in it. No different than shooting a 38 in a 357 or a 44 spcl in a 44 mag..... ????????????????
    I have done all of it without a hitch and the only issue is a lead/pwdr residue build up that need to be removed
    after shooting the shorter cartridge before shooting the longer one to be able to chamber it.
    The only difference in the 45-70, 45-90, 45-110 and 45-120 is the case length.
    If it is chambered for the 45-120 it will take all of them.
    Factory 45-70 rounds are kept to black powder pressures unless indicated otherwise so as to be safe in older arms.
    Just Curious why you made the not recommended comment??? Did I miss something somewhere?
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  4. Sabertooth

    Sabertooth Josephine County Active Member

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    For some reason the Sharps lose's accuracy with the shorter shell. Some the long time shooter's of the Sharps rifles have had other problems also, Nothing blown up just over all problems. Another thing is that 45-70 shells are loaded with smokeless powder. Load one of those in a 45-90 or 45-110 and you have a bomb. A 45-120 may hold together. If the 45-70 is loaded with black powder you are safe.
    I have loaded a number of .38 calibers, starting with .38 short on up and shot them in my .357 with no problems. Have also done the same with my .44rmag. However black powder rifles are a different critter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014
    U201491 likes this.
  5. U201491

    U201491 Well-Known Member

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    Ahh yes, the accuracy would be reduced or affected with the free space prior to rifling contact. Glad you clarified what you meant.
    The 45 basic and especially the 45-70 is still my favorite cartridge.
    Unbelievable hunting round out of a Siamese Mauser or a Faquarsen action.
    A poormans 458 mag with a 500 gr
    I shoot a Ruger #3 now still.
    It will take any game on this continent. :)

    .
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2014