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RPB Industries Cobray OPEN Bolt Mac 10 9mm

Discussion in 'Handgun Classifieds' started by DaisyDuke, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. DaisyDuke

    DaisyDuke Pacific Northwest New Member

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    Open Bolt Mac 10 9mm
    Comes with 32 round mag.
     
  2. rdb241

    rdb241 Puyallup Washington Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    Before the serial number there should be a 2 digit number with a dash then the serial number. What is the number before the dash. This is the year of manufacture. To be a legal open bolt it must be dated before 1986. After 86, no more new manufacture of open bolt.
     
  3. DaisyDuke

    DaisyDuke Pacific Northwest New Member

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    This one is 1979-1980 vintage.
    Actually the two digits started in 1981 and the ATF banned these in 1982.
    If you can show me a Legal Open Bolt from 83-86 I would love to see it.
     
  4. rdb241

    rdb241 Puyallup Washington Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    Well it just so happens that I have a RPB open bolt .45acp stamped 83- before the serial number. 1986 was the cut off for manufacture of open bolts. But I am not here to have a debate. I was just curious of the year of manufacture. Thanx.
     
  5. DaisyDuke

    DaisyDuke Pacific Northwest New Member

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    SWD started building them in 1983 and that was the closed bolt config. Wonder if yours was one of the last ones or something. RPB was out of business by 1983. Weird.
    Either way you have the evidence in your hand and I stand corrected. Thanks for the info, I learn something new everyday.

    I was going off of the ATF Ruling 82-8

    RPB open bolt semi's were only produced untill June 21st of 1982

    ATF Ruling 82-8

    The SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and SAC carbines are machineguns as defined in the National Firearms Act.

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms has reexamined firearms identified as SM10 pistols, SM11A1 pistols, and SAC carbines. The SM10 is a 9 millimeter or .45ACP caliber, semiautomatic firearm; the SM11A1 is a .380ACP caliber, semiautomatic firearm; and the SAC carbine is a 9 millimeter or .45ACP caliber, semiautomatic firearm. The weapons are blowback operated, fire from the open bolt position with the bolt incorporating a fixed firing pin, and the barrels of the pistols are threaded to accept a silencer. In addition, component parts of the weapons are a disconnector and a trip which prevent more than one shot being fired with a single function of the trigger.

    The disconnector and trip are designed in the SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and in the SAC carbine (firearms) in such a way that a simple modification to them, such as cutting, filing, or grinding, allows the firearms to operate automatically. Thus, this simple modification to the disconnector or trip, together with the configuration of the above design features (blowback operating, firing from the open bolt position, and fixed firing pin) in the SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and in the SAC carbine, permits the firearms to shoot automatically, more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger. The above combination of design features as employed in the SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and the SAC carbine are normally not found in typical sporting firearms.

    The National Firearms Act, 26 U.S.C. § 5845(b), defines a machinegun to include any weapon which shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.

    The "shoots automatically" definition covers weapons that will function automatically. The "readily restorable" definition defines weapons which previously could shoot automatically but will not in their present condition. The "designed" definition includes those weapons which have not previously functioned as machineguns but possess design features which facilitate full automatic fire by a simple modification or elimination of existing component parts.

    Held: The SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and the SAC carbine are designed to shoot automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger. Consequently, the SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and SAC carbines are machineguns as defined in Section 5845(b) of the Act.

    With respect to the machinegun classification of the SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and SAC carbines, under the National Firearms Act, pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 7805(b), this ruling will not be applied to SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and SAC carbines manufactured or assembled before June 21, 1982. Accordingly, SM10 and SM11A1 pistols and SAC carbines, manufactured or assembled on or after June 21, 1982, will be subject to all the provisions of the National Firearms Act and 27 C.F.R. Part 179.

    [ATFB 1982-2 49]
     
  6. rdb241

    rdb241 Puyallup Washington Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    Jeez...man you run into a key board professor everywhere on the net. Must be the small syndrome. I send my humblest, I am sorry. I had my dates mixed up. I just went to the safe and broke it out to take a look see. I haven't even fondled it in many years. The date is 81- and yes it it a .45 "legal" open bolt. Have a nice day. Like I said, I really did not want to start a debate. So you are correct. Bring all your peacock feathers back down.
     
  7. DaisyDuke

    DaisyDuke Pacific Northwest New Member

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    LOL... I wasn't Trying to start a debate. :thumbup: I am always open to the fact that I might have my facts wrong. It was the first time I had heard of your example and it came to me as a shock. I figured you might be holding a very Rare gun. With that said you have a good gun.
     
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