Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Opinions on Tokarev

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by tkdguy, May 26, 2010.

  1. tkdguy

    tkdguy Portland, Oregon Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

    Messages:
    1,098
    Likes Received:
    529
    Does anyone have an opinion on the quality, reliability and utility of the Russian Tokarev that was produced in limited quantities before the end of the big war. Do these have any collector value? The 7.62x54 ammo cost prohibitive? Thanks for your help. tkdguy
     
  2. raftman

    raftman Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,062
    Likes Received:
    259
    My understanding is, they'll be reliable and work without issue, but with more care and maintenance than needed by the far more common Russian 7.62x54R rifle, the Mosin. This is why the Tokarev rifles were less popular with Russian soldiers.

    They definitely have some sort of collector value in that they often sell for well above $1000, depending on condition, old, beaten up examples may sell for a bit less. As far as the price of 7.62x54R ammo goes, it's probably the most affordable round in its class, considerably cheaper than say 8mm Mauser or 30-06.
     
  3. Phonelesscord

    Phonelesscord Portland, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    I own one. They stopped making them for a reason. The rifle does not like to run well while dirty (40 rounds in and you'll get stovepipes and FTEs all day). Cheap to shoot and collectable though.

    Magazines cost something like $75-100 for reproductions, more for originals. The stripper-clip lips are tight. The gas system has a good handfull of small parts that like to fall of the rifle and is adjustable either with a specific tool or with some sort of rigged up pair of pliers covered in tape.

    That being said, I dont think Ill ever sell mine. They are sure rare, I got mine for a steal and it always brings attention at a range.
     
  4. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,663
    Likes Received:
    798
    If you are stovepiping after 40 rounds, are you using laquered ammo? If so, try brass or other. Make sure the old laquer is removed from the chamber flutes.

    Here is a good website for amplifying information if you are considering one.

    http://mosinnagant.net/USSR/SVTsection.asp

    I'd recommend one. Nowadays, a good Soviet refurb will run $700 to $800, a Finn capture a bit more. I've got both.

    Keith
     
  5. Phonelesscord

    Phonelesscord Portland, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    I dont use laquered ammo, mainly because all lacquered stuff I had was underpowered (Polish ammo) and had cycling issues with a clean rifle.

    Also, it's not actual "lacquer" on lacquered casings, it doesnt stick in the chamber. Ever.

    Im using Bulgarian 1980 copper wash steel case. The jamming is just because the chambers on these guns have always been and will always be touchy.
     
  6. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,663
    Likes Received:
    798
    If you are using the older laquered coated ammunition, or the newer polymer coated stuff, the result is the same. During slow fire, it can coat the chamber walls, cool, and turn to a sticky goo. All sorts or rifles including ARs can suffer from this, not just the SVT.

    Keith
     
  7. Phonelesscord

    Phonelesscord Portland, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    Take a fired "lacquer" case and I challenge you to try and melt the coating off at any heat.

    The jams arent from any "sticky coating" coming off, it's the non-expanding steel casings getting junk in the chamber and the coating, being rougher than bare brass or steel, grabs that dirty chamber.
     
  8. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,663
    Likes Received:
    798
    Well, I don't want to get in an online challenge match here. There are many many sources regarding to laquer and polymer coatings and their effects on extraction. I don't need to repeat them here. Anyone interested enough can research them if they choose. From my personal experience, I clean the chamber (with special attention to the flutes) after each range session and I've never had a FTF ot FTE other than when initially setting the gas valves to the proper settings for each ammo I'm using, which is expected if following the proper gas valve adjustment procedure.

    Back to the OP, here's another interesting review of the SVT-40 (from a Finnish writer I believe) regarding the pros and cons of the SVT-40 system.

    http://www.jaegerplatoon.net/RIFLES4.htm

    Keith
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2010
  9. trainsktg

    trainsktg Portland OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,663
    Likes Received:
    798
    As a caveat, I've read and understand both descriptions as to the cause of stuck cases...a lacquer buildup and a carbon deposit buildup as you describe. However, due to the fact that lacquer coated ammo has largely been discontinued for the former given reason, that's the one I'm going to go with.

    Keith
     
  10. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Greater Seattle Area Member

    Messages:
    209
    Likes Received:
    2
    Don't forget the possibility of cosmoline that hasn't been completely removed... that also gets more solid over time, then gooifies as it heats up. If it can cause sticky bolt syndrome in a Mosin Nagant 91/30, it can cause gummed up action in an SVT.
     
  11. Phonelesscord

    Phonelesscord Portland, Oregon Member

    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    Nah man, I've cl;eaned the **** out of my rifle :D