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Online Gunsmithing Courses.

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by Randoja, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. Randoja

    Randoja Beaverton, Or New Member

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    Hey forum members,
    I recently found out that the VA will pay for me to take gunsmithing courses. I don't think there is much offered locally, so I was considering a comprehensive correspondence type course. Are any of them worthwhile, are some better than others? I looked at an older thread that had mention AGI video course, but thought there might be some new info out there. Thanks.
     
  2. Fordcragar

    Fordcragar Renton, Washington Active Member

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  3. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    I've known a few folks that have taken the AGI courses. Somewhat helpful!
    There are not allot of gun smithing shops around these days, so it's very difficult to hang out and learn there. Colorado School of Trades is still one of the best.
     
  4. Randoja

    Randoja Beaverton, Or New Member

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    Yes, that was the first thing I did.
    Thanks for the input bud.
     
  5. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    If you can get yourself any type of machining experience that is going to hep you allot.
    Need to learn how to thread on a manual lathe. And thread good!
    Also milling machine experience will help allot. Drilling holes in hard steel and then tapping. I don't do any tapping on the mill. But I do start the threading there, just start a thread or two.
     
    etrain16 likes this.
  6. etrain16

    etrain16 Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My job (electrician) had me drilling and tapping quite a bit, into various materials from soft aluminum to steel to stainless. Each one has its own unique set of challenges. Now, drilling and tapping into a rounded surface, that's a whole different critter entirely - most of the surfaces I worked on were flat, though from time to time I had to tap a rounded surface - I would think it would be even more critical for a gunsmith to get it perfectly on the mark.

    We did threading too, usually just rigid steel conduit, and we did a lot of that as well, but again, no where near as precise as what a gunsmith has to do. All that said, i was thankful to learn those skills, as from time to time it's come in handy at home.

    To the OP, though I'm no gunsmith, I agree with Velzey and I strongly recommend getting those skills if you can, as they will translate not only into gunsmithing, but other repairs for home and auto.