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Nickle casses

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by country boy, Feb 27, 2010.

  1. country boy

    country boy portland area Member

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    I was wondering what the advantages of nickle casses were over standard brass cases. Thanks
     
  2. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    they shine up real fast in a tumbler,but split sooner than 'brass' cases.
     
  3. Tilos

    Tilos Idaho Active Member

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    Originally, nickel cases were for corrosion protection in leather holsters and cartridge belt loops.
    Now I believe most defense and +P ammo is plated for easier visual identification.
    I'm sure others will have more reasons to add.

    Tilos
     
  4. Ghost_Rider

    Ghost_Rider Oregon Member

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    Tilos,
    Is correct about they were designed for corrosion protection in leather and extended use in the chamber of your gun. They say brass can corrode if left in the chamber for a extended period of time and if your outside in wet weather conditions. Personally I have had brass cartridges discolor, but never had any corrode in the chamber. Leave brass in leather and its only a matter of time before it starts turning green/blue.

    And no disrespect or ill intent to you Tilos, but the reason you see a lot of defense ammo and +P ammo in nickel cases is for the corrosion, not a load identifier. I have some Corbon defense loads, 9mm 115gr JHP +P+ 1350 fps and .40 S&W 165gr JHP 1150fps and there both brass case.

    Also Throckmorton is absolutely correct on the split nickel casing's. Back in 1977 I had my old boss load me up some .38 Special loads, before I started reloading and all five on the first test fire split all the way from the rim to the mouth of the case. Needless to say I took the rest back to my boss and showed him they were a little "HOT" and he broke them down and lightened the load. lol
    That taught me not to reload any "HOT" loads. I only purchase "HOT" loads for defense.


    Blue Skies
     
  5. country boy

    country boy portland area Member

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    Ok, so corrosion resistance is pretty much the only advantage over brass cases. Thanks for the replies.
     
  6. Ghost_Rider

    Ghost_Rider Oregon Member

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    You got it.:thumbup:
     
  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    The splitting is new to me. I've not seen more of that in nickle plated but I can't say it isn't so. I've seen both split.

    Don't overlook how easily and nicely it cleans up as someone mentioned so corrosion resistance isn't the only advantage.

    I have 1,000 once fired matched hs Speer 9mm cases I plan to load up for my PF-9 and they were really hard to find.
     
  8. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Nickel cases are shinner and look good all over the mat when shooting. They are harder on steel dies, than non-plated cases. With carbide dies, you can easly see when you have a scratch in the die. When reloading for your own use, they make it easier at the ranges to usually tell which case are yours.. assuming not many others are shooting w/nickel case..

    I like both when clean and shinny
     
  9. Rascals

    Rascals Portland Or Active Member

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    I load up nickle cases to let me know they are hunting rounds. They dont last as long but they also dont corrode as fast.
     
  10. TacomaCP

    TacomaCP Tacoma, WA New Member

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    I always figured it was because they could charge more. :D