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Looking for a machinist

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by elsie, Jun 11, 2014.

  1. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

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    Who can do a one-off of a broken (non-firearm part). I'd prefer the material to be something along the lines of 304 stainless steel (but that's based on a 20 year old memory - there might be something better now).

    Part pics:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/b24noe5vjzau72y/100_xg1.JPG


    elsie


    edit: corrected link
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  2. Nickb

    Nickb Moxee Active Member

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    Your pictures didn't load.
     
  3. cmica

    cmica puy Active Member

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    second that
     
  4. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    If I could see what it was, I might be able to make it, FYI 304 is not all that easy to machine, 303 has good corrosion resistance, with a little bit of sulfur added so it machines easier and better.
     
  5. Nickb

    Nickb Moxee Active Member

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    Yep, 303 is much better. It's a little "duller" looker than 304.
     
    Redcap likes this.
  6. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

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    Updated the link. Hopefully it will load correctly now. I think the part that broke was aluminum possibly using a MIM process. So even 303 would be better.
     
  7. Nickb

    Nickb Moxee Active Member

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    A sheet metal shop with a laser, and a welder is more what you're looking for.
     
  8. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    That's a Zamak casting... it's a zinc-tin casting alloy used for die casting. Unless it really needs corrosion resistance, it should probably be made of aluminum or steel.

    I thought you had an actual mechanical drawing.
     
  9. elsie

    elsie Way over there on the left Well-Known Member

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    I could get out the calipers and do up a drawing, although it's been about 20 years since I've done one. And my cad software is old... AutoCAD 13. Probably take longer to set up the table and gear, than to do the drawing. B-)

    As far as materials, I defer to those with experience. Aluminum or steel would probably work and I assume that those materials can take the lateral stresses better than the existing part.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014