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Llama 380 blue IIIa

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by 4xpy4, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. 4xpy4

    4xpy4 Usa New Member

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    Llama 380. Blued. 1orig llama mag. Date code m2. Have orig red llama box it was sold in. I bought it new and it sat on shelf most of these years. Have put prob 200 rounds thru it.

    No idea what it's worth but there seem to be some llama experts on this board. Let me know if u are interested.
     
  2. bluecz97b

    bluecz97b Gresham Member

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    300-400 depending on condition and how bad someone wants it.
     
  3. saxon

    saxon springfield Active Member

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    current sold price on gunbroker is between $300 and $400 for all guns that did sell
     
  4. SJS46

    SJS46 yamhill county Active Member

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    Got any pic's?
     
  5. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    The M2 means it is 1993 production. If everything else was the same and it was pre 70s it would be worth up to $400. The later models are not as popular and you should get $275-$325 for it.
     
  6. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    I think that's right: The later ones are blowback, while early models had a locked breech.
     
  7. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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  8. Partsproduction

    Partsproduction Tillamook Oregon Active Member

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    The locked breech Llama's are probably more comfortable to shoot. I have several locked breech Llama's but no blowbacks, so I don't know.


    Post Script, I and many others do not find the blowback Llama's interesting or desirable, so I'd guess the lower figure is probably correct.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2011
  9. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    I own both and the locked breech is definitely a softer shooter. I even find the .32ACP, which only comes in blowback, has a harsher recoil than the locked breech .380. I believe that another reason the locked breech sell for more is they are better made/machined and just feel better in your hand. I believe that Llama's Especial lineup is their best run of pistols. The locked breech .380s are Especials.
     
  10. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    I like the weight, but the grip is too small for me and the spring is too stiff for my bride to rack easily. I can't figure why a locked-breech gun would need such a stiff spring.
    I finally put a Hogue Handall Jr. rubber sleeve on the grip - next week I'll go shoot it and remind myself again why it's not my favorite .380.
     
  11. Partsproduction

    Partsproduction Tillamook Oregon Active Member

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    Have you tried having her cock it first? I do that with guns that I have trouble racking, usually blowbacks though as you implied. My PPK/s has enough spring pressure, and so little grasping area, that I find it hard to rack, and my wife can't do it at all.
     
  12. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    That's a good idea, but we solved it by getting her a Bersa Thunder .380 CC. It's head and shoulders above the Llama.
     
  13. Partsproduction

    Partsproduction Tillamook Oregon Active Member

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    A Llama is so much more interesting than a Bersa, but that too is just an opinion.
     
  14. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    The locked breech Llama .380s aren't too difficult to rack. The blow back is harder for sure. Is it possible you have a blow bac spring in there? Was it ever replaced?
     
  15. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    I agree with both of the preceding comments - the Llama, like any 1911, is more "interesting" than a simple blowback Bersa - especially to an engineer. But that Llama has bitten my hand more than once, and the Bersa never does.

    I bought my Micromax used around 25 years ago, so it's entirely possible that the wrong recoil spring was put in it at some time. Doesn't matter to me - I still can't shoot it for bubblegum, having tried and failed yet again a couple days ago.
     
  16. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    Is it a Micromax? Does it say that on the slide? The Micromax series came out in the 90s and is a blow back. It is not totally compatible with the earlier IIIA series tho they look the same. The locked breech is an IIIA Especial. Totally different pistol than the Micromax. If there is a Micromax spring in it then it will be a jam-o-matic for sure.
     
  17. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    See, I didn't know that about the Micromax designation - mine says "Especial," and it's definitely a locked breech and was born before the Nineties. It doesn't FTF ever, but it has stovepiped a couple times. It sure is hard to rack, though.
     
  18. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    When the Llama small frames stovepipe it's usually the recoil spring. It could be the extractor as well so if the tip looks fine it's probably the spring. I'd bet it's a blowback spring in a locked breech design. Since it doesn't work right and the locked breech springs are rare I'd try cutting off 1/2 a coil at a time to see if it starts to work properly. It is stronger than the locked breech but I don't know if making it shorter will offset the extra spring weight. It should. You have nothing to lose if it sits in a safe for 10 more years or you can sell it like it is or you can cut down the spring you have to see if it will work. Just a suggestion.
     
  19. chemist

    chemist Beaverton OR Well-Known Member

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    Wow - sounds like DIY brain surgery. I think I'd look for a Wolff kit to mess with before irreversibly altering the parts it came with. I almost never tear it down anyway - it'll be a good Wintertime project.
     
  20. larryh1108

    larryh1108 CT Member

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    Well, you can keep the spring it came with and buy the Micromax springs online and use those. Cutting off 1/2 a coil at a time is not brain surgery. Changing a recoil spring takes 5 mins or less. Finding time to shoot it each time is a pain unless you have a back yard range. Here's a link. I don't think Wolff stocks Llama small frame springs. Recoil Spring