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kmk1012

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I’ve been going back and forth between the Walker Razor XV (neck band with retractable ear buds) and the Silencer ear buds. Both seem to have advantages over each other. I’d prefer the cordless type but really worry about losing the bud out of an ear. If you’ve tried them please chime in!
 
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I’ve been going back and forth between the Walker Razor XV (neck band with retractable ear buds) and the Silencer ear buds. Both seem to have advantages over each other. I’d prefer the cordless type but really worry about losing the bud out of an ear. If you’ve tried them please chime in!
I hope this is useful to you. As I understand it, ear muffs are better protection than an ear bud or plug. While a plug may provide greater measured noise reduction, it doesn't cover the bones around the ear that also transmit sound. You can still damage your hearing wearing buds. Much less than going without, of course. If you don't want to spend $300 on a top line set of amplified muffs, Peltor makes very good quality unit that would probably be in your price range. They even make a low profile set that you can wear with a hat.
 
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I have the Walker Razor XV, non-bluetooth version. It works great for putting in range time, attenuates more than headphones, it doesn't painfully press my glasses stems into the side of my head or squish my ears to the point of torture, I can wear any hat I want, and they don't get in the way of cheekweld.

That said, when I got them I had hoped to use them while hunting and I assumed they would be directional -- they aren't at all -- you can hear your surroundings great but you have no idea where the sound is coming from and I found them to be extremely disorienting when trying to walk in the woods or on logging roads. Because I intended to hunt with them, I incorrectly figured the bluetooth feature would be irrelevant. It turned out they were useless for hunting, and for other uses like mowing the lawn or working with noisy tools, I like to listen to a podcast or music at the same time and without bluetooth, you can't do that. So ultimately, I only use them at the range. I wish I'd paid the extra 30 bucks or whatever for bluetooth.
 

kmk1012

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I hope this is useful to you. As I understand it, ear muffs are better protection than an ear bud or plug. While a plug may provide greater measured noise reduction, it doesn't cover the bones around the ear that also transmit sound. You can still damage your hearing wearing buds. Much less than going without, of course. If you don't want to spend $300 on a top line set of amplified muffs, Peltor makes very good quality unit that would probably be in your price range. They even make a low profile set that you can wear with a hat.
Thank you for replying. I already have a rather large assortment of over the ear muffs and am quite happy with them. I’m specifically looking for something more comfortable and less sweaty when shooting prone, bench rest, as well as at work on equipment.
 
I have the Silencers. Eh, not worth the money IMHO. I now use my Impact muffs for pistol and some Surefire EP7's for rifle work.
 

kmk1012

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I have the Walker Razor XV, non-bluetooth version. It works great for putting in range time, attenuates more than headphones, it doesn't painfully press my glasses stems into the side of my head or squish my ears to the point of torture, I can wear any hat I want, and they don't get in the way of cheekweld.

That said, when I got them I had hoped to use them while hunting and I assumed they would be directional -- they aren't at all -- you can hear your surroundings great but you have no idea where the sound is coming from and I found them to be extremely disorienting when trying to walk in the woods or on logging roads. Because I intended to hunt with them, I incorrectly figured the bluetooth feature would be irrelevant. It turned out they were useless for hunting, and for other uses like mowing the lawn or working with noisy tools, I like to listen to a podcast or music at the same time and without bluetooth, you can't do that. So ultimately, I only use them at the range. I wish I'd paid the extra 30 bucks or whatever for bluetooth.
I’m leaning towards the Bluetooth version that you have. I like rechargeable as well as being able to wear under muffs when necessary. Do you find the cords durable?
 
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... As I understand it, ear muffs are better protection than an ear bud or plug. While a plug may provide greater measured noise reduction, it doesn't cover the bones around the ear that also transmit sound. You can still damage your hearing wearing buds. ...

That's interesting. I know best policy is "both" but I really find muffs uncomfortable because of my glasses and my ear getting squished. It gets really painful (or if it is comfortable, the glasses stems provide a pathway for ingress of noise).
 
I shot today, and couldn't wait to take my muffs off between sets.

Now my Surefire's? They are AWESOME but I can't hear a damn thing anyone is saying! :D
 
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I’m leaning towards the Bluetooth version that you have. I like rechargeable as well as being able to wear under muffs when necessary. Do you find the cords durable?

I've had no issues with the cords -- I've only had them since last summer and I've used them on average 3-5 times per month, though not for the whole year I've had them. At first I was so disgusted with having wasted $100ish on something that wouldn't hunt, I just put them up. But I will say that for range work, I really do like them.
 

kmk1012

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I've had no issues with the cords -- I've only had them since last summer and I've used them on average 3-5 times per month, though not for the whole year I've had them. At first I was so disgusted with having wasted $100ish on something that wouldn't hunt, I just put them up. But I will say that for range work, I really do like them.
Thanks for the info, one last question. I have a larger than average neck and do you think that the neck band will interfere or put excessive pressure on my throat?
 
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I have Tinnitus, let me be clear buds are minimal protection. I know they are so much more convenient.
Let me tell you what isn't ............24/7 ringing for 12 years. Yea and you guys wonder why I get testy around here at times LOL.
It actually wasn't because of Firearms, it was an explosion, anyways after that trying to keep whats left of hearing became my duty,
so I can say buds not unless their under a pair of muffs. " ear muffs for you pervs"
 
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That's interesting. I know best policy is "both" but I really find muffs uncomfortable because of my glasses and my ear getting squished. It gets really painful (or if it is comfortable, the glasses stems provide a pathway for ingress of noise).
I have both issues with most earmuffs. My Peltor Slimline earmuffs with neckband don't pinch my eye protection, don't mash my ears and maintain a good seal. They also don't interfere with my cheek weld on a rifle stock. Also the neckband allows you to wear them under a hat. Since we're all shaped differently I can't say how they'd do for you, but it's worth trying them on if you see a pair.
 
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I have both issues with most earmuffs. My Peltor Slimline earmuffs with neckband don't pinch my eye protection, don't mash my ears and maintain a good seal. They also don't interfere with my cheek weld on a rifle stock. Also the neckband allows you to wear them under a hat. Since we're all shaped differently I can't say how they'd do for you, but it's worth trying them on if you see a pair.

These sound worth checking out -- thanks.
 
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Thanks for the info, one last question. I have a larger than average neck and do you think that the neck band will interfere or put excessive pressure on my throat?

Well, it's U shaped so you shouldn't have any pressure on your throat at all -- they just sort of hang over my collarbone and are totally open in the front. If you're neck is larger than normal, it might be worth seeing if you can try them on somewhere -- I will say that when I wear them, I wear them over my shirt (I usually wear collared shirts) and if it is coat or vest weather, over that too, and there's plenty of room even over clothes. I buy 16.5" to 17" collared shirts.
 
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Maybe this will help. You can see two darker strips -- I marked those as "flexible rubber" -- they open very wide with very little tension. the second picture might give you an idea of their flexibility. If your neck was sufficiently thick to spread them, I doubt you'd notice it happening. For all my complaints about how non-directional they are, I find them very comfortable -- I've gone into stores and restaurants wearing them without even knowing it.

aa1.jpg

aa2.jpg
 

kmk1012

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Maybe this will help. You can see two darker strips -- I marked those as "flexible rubber" -- they open very wide with very little tension. the second picture might give you an idea of their flexibility. If your neck was sufficiently thick to spread them, I doubt you'd notice it happening. For all my complaints about how non-directional they are, I find them very comfortable -- I've gone into stores and restaurants wearing them without even knowing it.

View attachment 483240

View attachment 483241
I think you just sold me a pair, the flexibility is what I was concerned about.
 
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I think you just sold me a pair, the flexibility is what I was concerned about.

Those rubber sections are like wet noodles. ;-)

In looking at the pictures I took, I see there is what appears to be only one microphone hole. I don't know why I thought it, but I thought the ear pieces had separate mics. My disappointment in them looks to be my fault.
 

kmk1012

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I hear what you are saying about the directionality of the mics but, I just think for my purpose they would be perfect.
 
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I have Tinnitus, let me be clear buds are minimal protection. I know they are so much more convenient.
Let me tell you what isn't ............24/7 ringing for 12 years. Yea and you guys wonder why I get testy around here at times LOL.
It actually wasn't because of Firearms, it was an explosion, anyways after that trying to keep whats left of hearing became my duty,
so I can say buds not unless their under a pair of muffs. " ear muffs for you pervs"

I've had tinnitus since the 8th grade -- so 36ish years. I remember when I first noticed it I roamed the house for hours trying to figure out what was making that bubbleguming noise. Since then I've grown so used to it I don't really notice unless I think about it. Interestingly, it hasn't affected my hearing which is still excellent (to the annoyance of many in my office, LOL) even in the high frequencies. What is weird about it though, is that if I'm in total silence, it sounds nearly deafening but if I make the slightest sound such as rubbing two fingers together, the ringing disappears, then as soon as I stop making the sound the ringing comes back. I solve the problem of going to sleep by quietly playing an audiobook - the timer shuts it off in 15 minutes and it is a rare night I ever have to go another 15.
 
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