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.44 Magnum Levergun Options?

As the .44 Magnum revolver is working out, I find myself tempted by a levergun in said. Time was, a Winchester or Marlin would be the obvious choice. I'm not sure of the former now and I'm avoiding the latter after dealing the last one (in .45/70). The Henry's do nothing for me from a aesthetic standpoint, but if they work, that is fine. Rossi produces them too, and the one wheelgun we have from them is great, but I just don't know what the leverguns are like. And I'm sure there are options I'm missing.

If one was interesting in a new or lightly used .44 Magnum lever-action, what would be your recommendation? Thanks!
 

OldBroad44

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As the .44 Magnum revolver is working out, I find myself tempted by a levergun in said. Time was, a Winchester or Marlin would be the obvious choice. I'm not sure of the former now and I'm avoiding the latter after dealing the last one (in .45/70). The Henry's do nothing for me from a aesthetic standpoint, but if they work, that is fine. Rossi produces them too, and the one wheelgun we have from them is great, but I just don't know what the leverguns are like. And I'm sure there are options I'm missing.

If one was interesting in a new or lightly used .44 Magnum lever-action, what would be your recommendation? Thanks!
I'm interested in a .44 mag lever gun too. And I'm not very familiar with lever guns. So far the two most appealing options to me are the Taylor ALaskan Takedown. The all weather version. I can see some real advantages to a takedown lever gun. The other obvious option is a MArlin. But I've read the current ones are poorly finished, and used is the way to go. The big appeal to the Marlin for me is it has side ejection, allowing the mounting of a scope. And I have 72 year old eyes at this point. Are there other brands that have side ejection? Anybody familiar with the TAylor Alaskan Takedown? Are there other lever action guns that take down?
 

Ura-Ki

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I know more then a few who have had the Rossi in .44 for the Cowboy action shooting matches, I know they do need some smithin, but all the ones I have seen ran slicker then dog snot! I got a Neufy, I KNOW dog snot! Lol
Another thought, a replica Winchester , a 1895 or.........
A replica Colt Rifle in .44 mag!:) not sure of yet budget, but I would kinda sort of like a slick replica of a classic lever or revolver! If my Old Smith in Co. Hadn't gone and up and quit, I could have put you in touch with him, and if he believed you worthy, he would have built you a Colt patent Revolving rifle in .44 mag! Those are the schiznit!
 
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I have a Rossi in 357 and it is a great shooter - mine is the 24" octagon barrel - if I were looking for a 44 and anted to save some $$$ I would seriously consider the Rossi.
 

ma96782

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Are you going to be mounting a scope?

I ask because......
You should know that a top eject action may pose more of a problem vs a side eject (Marlin). Not to mention that, the Marlin has the mounting holes already drilled (modern ones anyway).

While you're evaluating actions......try loading one from the belt. Which do you suppose is faster and more convenient to load?

Of the two choices (Rossi and Marlin), have you thought about small replacement parts (should they be needed)?

I've found clone 1892s to have rough/clunky actions (I've owned three). The newer Rem-Marlins are not good either (tried it at a Pawn Shop once). But, the older REAL Marlins are a joy to behold (look for the JM on the barrel). Currently I own two in .357 Mag/.38 Special.

Actually, you should always try it (the lever action movement), before you buy it. That is why I passed on that Pawn Shop Marlin. Even though it was offered at a great price. Not to mention that, I once went looking for a new Marlin (Rem-Marlin) at a Gun Shop. LOL......the fit of the wood to metal, was $#@*. The inspector must have been sleeping on the job.:eek:

Aloha, Mark
 
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WAYNO

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Really nice JM Marlins are still often available at very reasonable prices. That would be my choice.

Additionally, in spite of the anti-Remlin editorials, I've owned and/or shot quite a few. They all worked and shot as perfectly as the originals.
 
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Really nice JM Marlins are still often available at very reasonable prices. That would be my choice.
I was going to state the Very same thing. WAYNO just beat me to it. I'm not a fan of the Guns with the LL but I have seen some that worked just fine. The Henry rifles just don't work for me but others consider them to be okay.
 
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I just got a 44 magnum Marlin Lever gun: Couldn't ask for more... this 2018 model works great right out of the box. Includes a hammer-offset spur with the gun (for scope use). Action is NEW and a little stiff BUT nothing like what earlier reviews reported. Wood to metal fitting is great, not perfect BUT this is a new $500 gun not a custom work. Holds (11} 44 Specials in the tube and cycles without complaint. Hammer and trigger have no side play. FAR SUPERIOR to first "Remlin" models. The cross-bolt safety is placed great, works great when UNLOADING, my Dad accidentally shot a round off unloading another version without the safety. Dark walnut is beautiful. A really great gun!!!

The 2018 model also has standard rifling allowing it to shoot standard revolver ammo accurately (as youtube commentators report).

I looked on NWFF for used prices: What a disappointment! Sportsmans Werehouse had one new for :eek: $769??? I got mine NEW off the internet thru GrabAGun for $516 plus $58 for tax and transfer fee (saved $200) ...guess many just buy local at outrageous prices then want to resell used too high also. LOL ;)
 
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In my experiance, Marlins have always been superior to Winchester’s. They fit better, have superior engineering even in antiques. I would be on the hunt for a middle aged Marlin with light use........although, I am mostly ignorant about the Henry products. I don’t do Oriental (anything) and the Rossies and the like leave me cold. I am not sure what Browning makes anymore (being they too are Oriental built). Brownings always shoot as they are supposed to reguardless of where they are made. Didn’t they make a M92? A Belgian BLR can not be bested but they were never made in pistol calibers.
 

AndyinEverson

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The one Browning M92 I shot ....was fantastic.
It shot well , the rear sight had a fairly wide notch and made sighting quick and easy...

JM Marlins , it almost goes without saying that they work and work well.
I owned two 1894's one .357 and one in .44 Magnum...both were outstanding in workmanship and shooting.
Just hated the crossbolt safety....so they went on to other folks....

Of the Rossi's that I owned and shot , its been kinda hit and miss...some were great as is...many turned into great shooters , with a bit of work , a few were just plain bad...
That said...its been awhile since I've had or shot a Rossi...so maybe things are different now....

Henry's I like 'cause they are made in the USA , they work well , customer service is excellent...but the lack of a side loading gate , is irksome to me....

Never did take to the Winchester M94 in .44 Magnum...but the reproduction M92 by Uberti in .44 Magnum that I shot , seemed really nice , good looking , ran smooth and shot well...
Andy
 

fredball

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I have Henry golden boys in 38-357 mag///44spec/44mag & 30-30 the actions are like butter and very accurite with iron sites

a young man I know has a marlin in 30-30 and has nothing but problems with it , Finding a winchester in 357 or 44 is just a lot of money for the same thing in a henry , I see your not a fan of Henry I hope you find what your looking for Life is short
I tend to buy what works and not worry about the small sh!t.
If you decide to buy a henry you should be able to get a new one in 357/44 for around 625.00 and a 30-30 for 600
 

etrain16

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I'm interested in adding a .357 lever myself - and seriously considering the Rossi. But I do so knowing that, from the factory, they can be a bit rough. A friend got one that was, out of the box, quite smooth. But it appears to be luck of the draw. I would get one knowing I would likely send it to @Velzey for some fine tuning - I got to handle a Rossi he slicked up a while back and it was truly smooth as snot.

That said, if you don't have a Velzey type person close to you, I've seen a number of folks highly recommend the kits and info available to do it yourself at home from this site: Steve's Gunz | "The Rossi 92 Specialist" Got the reference off some folks online that use Rossi's for cowboy action shooting - he comes highly recommended.
 
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I'm interested in a .44 mag lever gun too. And I'm not very familiar with lever guns. So far the two most appealing options to me are the Taylor ALaskan Takedown. The all weather version. I can see some real advantages to a takedown lever gun. The other obvious option is a MArlin. But I've read the current ones are poorly finished, and used is the way to go. The big appeal to the Marlin for me is it has side ejection, allowing the mounting of a scope. And I have 72 year old eyes at this point. Are there other brands that have side ejection? Anybody familiar with the TAylor Alaskan Takedown? Are there other lever action guns that take down?
In my opinion the finest lever gun ever made was the Savage 99 and they made a takedown version but not in 44mag.
 

bbbass

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I don’t do Oriental (anything)
And yet the other day you told me you eat Sushi. :eek:

We were sitting very close to my Toyota (my first Oriental car after driving GM for many years. Prior to that I had a Subaru. Before that, VW Rabbit Diesel PU which i liked a lot but it was underpowered. 50mpg tho.) and the Toyota had my Daiwa rod and reel, my Shimano, etc. I once had a Charles Daly Miroku O/U and it was a fine weapon with excellent engraving and detailing. Unfortunately it had those dang leaf spring trigger springs that would break.

I really don't care where something is made if it is high quality, but many of the WWII vets wouldn't buy a thing from those countries. Ever. I can understand that.
 
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I still have a VW Diesel pickup. I am not raciest at all, most of my buddies growing up were Japanese and I love them (as hard as I tried, could never get there sisters to date me). What I object to is there marketing theories and they still resist making vehicles large enough for my size frame, they still don’t make a great powerful commercial truck. They follow the Henry Ford theory (Ford was really upset that his cars lasted so long and was fired as one of the founders of Cadillac for not wanting to build a quality product) of planed obsolescence. There products are not bad when bought new but the ability and cost to repair it when needed is designed to encourage you to buy a new one where even my oldest (60 year old) Mercedes I can get Parts from the dealer for. I also prefer German simplicity of engineering. Those attitudes permeate through there society and products. Oriental parts are equally expensive and still not the quality overall. Many of my buddies dads were in the 442 combat regiment, the Valedictorians at my schools were always Jappaneese and even though I was twice the size of many of them, I could never compete athletically with them either. I lost one of my good high school friends in the Tet offensive in 1968 that was co valedictorian of his graduating class in my large Spokane high school. So, I have a long positive association with the people but even when I was a kid, Mrs Mukai (the mother of several of my buddies) would talk about “Junk Jappaneese” products. We didn’t take the time to show you my old Merkel shotgun.....next time.....it is 80 years old, is so butter smooth and tight as to be surreal. I have 8 or so German/Austrian/Belgian built gun’s and they are all the same. I have 7 Mercedes and every one is the best of there time for the job they were designed for (my 86 190D gets 50 MPG) and the new AMG crossover (4X4) we are picking up at the factory next spring does 0-60 in 3.5 seconds and over 1G in lateral acceleration, it is limited to 160 MPH in Europe and 150 here in the states. We have been around a lot of Isuzu diesels in my marine world, they were very aggressively marketed and I knew the west coast distributor. When one hiccuped, they would say......”bring it in, we will give you a new one” well, the engine is 2000 lbs 3 decks down in a steel hulled boat that you cut the side out of to get it out. With my Cummins, I would call my rep and a technician would arrive the next day or so to fix the problem. That illustrates Oriental marketing to me.
 
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In my opinion the finest lever gun ever made was the Savage 99 and they made a takedown version but not in 44mag.
I have one of those too.......in 300 Savage. Looking for the 410 shotgun accessory barrel they made for it. It is an incredible rifle. It is in the shop for repair, the forend pops off when fired but it will be fine after a bit of tweaking. I bought it from a guy here on the Forum.
 

bbbass

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IDK... I put over 250,000 miles on both my Subaru wagons. They were still running long after I sold them. And I was told they used a lot of recycled metal in them. Interesting that the engines were boxer style based on the VW but water cooled. OTH, my Toyota is so complicated that I can't work on it. IMO that's not unusual for today's vehicles no matter where made.

My wife had a Pontiac Phoenix... planned obsolence of 3yrs... it was a phase American car makers went thru.

When we lived in Brookings, we had to get rid of that Phoenix so we went to Medford to look at cars. At the time we liked full size sedans, so we sat in a few Mercedes... I couldn't believe how spartan and uncomfortable they were. I guess we were looking at the wrong class. But we wound up buying a nice comfy Chevy Caprice. ;)

Mercedes are always in the garage. :p Just like my British sports cars. :rolleyes:

Have you ever noticed how hard Japanese business people bargain? It's all one sided when dealing with them. They will get the best deal possible, then refuse to take delivery for the slightest reason. Very tough businessmen. And Japanese product used to be junk after the war, but went on to become the very best you could buy. Nikon cameras and scopes, oh my. I was surprised at how Korea got into the markets and became providers of good quality products. Things change. But yeah, Toyota trucks don't come close to having the power or size that you need.

Neither are the big players in our economy any more. China is the big player. Talk about unfair trade practices!!! At least the Germans didn't steal engineering from us, we stole from them!!!

I still evaluate products/companies on an individual basis. But I'm aging... 10yrs or less after I have gotten an impression of a company, things go all to hell when some bean counter takes control and puts $$ before quality. And that's across the board, American companies as well as overseas.
 
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I have Winchester 94 Trapper models in both 44mag and 357, I like how the shorties look. But, I don't really shoot them much and I think if I was buying one to shoot a lot I'd probably go with the Marlin. I think the Marlin is built a little more robust.
 
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IDK... I put over 250,000 miles on both my Subaru wagons. They were still running long after I sold them. And I was told they used a lot of recycled metal in them. Interesting that the engines were boxer style based on the VW but water cooled. OTH, my Toyota is so complicated that I can't work on it. IMO that's not unusual for today's vehicles no matter where made.

My wife had a Pontiac Phoenix... planned obsolence of 3yrs... it was a phase American car makers went thru.

When we lived in Brookings, we had to get rid of that Phoenix so we went to Medford to look at cars. At the time we liked full size sedans, so we sat in a few Mercedes... I couldn't believe how spartan and uncomfortable they were. I guess we were looking at the wrong class. But we wound up buying a nice comfy Chevy Caprice. ;)

Mercedes are always in the garage. :p Just like my British sports cars. :rolleyes:

Have you ever noticed how hard Japanese business people bargain? It's all one sided when dealing with them. They will get the best deal possible, then refuse to take delivery for the slightest reason. Very tough businessmen. And Japanese product used to be junk after the war, but went on to become the very best you could buy. Nikon cameras and scopes, oh my. I was surprised at how Korea got into the markets and became providers of good quality products. Things change. But yeah, Toyota trucks don't come close to having the power or size that you need.

Neither are the big players in our economy any more. China is the big player. Talk about unfair trade practices!!! At least the Germans didn't steal engineering from us, we stole from them!!!

I still evaluate products/companies on an individual basis. But I'm aging... 10yrs or less after I have gotten an impression of a company, things go all to hell when some bean counter takes control and puts $$ before quality. And that's across the board, American companies as well as overseas.
The orientals learned everything from other people in the world. I have Linhof and Leica cameras. Nikon is good but they learned everything from the German’s and have yet to improve on there products in any way outside of marketing. You need to come to the ranch and look through my Austrian and German rifle scopes. They are unequaled. The Jappaneese learned lens technology from the Germans before WW2. There autos are the same way. They have advanced manufacturing systems allowing them to build acceptable products for inexpensive costs but today, they are not even that inexpensive. The Jappaneese economy has been in the tank for decades since American products became more competitive. They bennifit from not having union issues to deal with allowing them to move and change there industries as nessisary but even with that they are not doing particularly well. There isn’t a oriental car that isn’t bested by a German one in any way but cost.
 

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