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New O/U Shotgun

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Flymph

Flymph

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I almost bought a 20 gauge, but I kept reading that the loads of a 12 can be brought down to be similar to a 20 gauge.
The next shotgun will either be 12 with 3 1/2” chambers or an O/U 20 gauge. Probably a Citori or Silver Pidgeon.
 

Joe13

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Probably cuz I'm a large guy but I can't tell much of a difference between 12ga and 20ga.

I did keep my 20ga Ammo though cuz I'm sure I'll get another on someday.

I'm addicted to shotguns....
 
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I almost bought a 20 gauge, but I kept reading that the loads of a 12 can be brought down to be similar to a 20 gauge.
The next shotgun will either be 12 with 3 1/2” chambers or an O/U 20 gauge. Probably a Citori or Silver Pidgeon.
If you want a really nice upland gun get a 16. All the power of a 12, but they feel and weight like a 20. Better patterns too usually.
 
OP
Flymph

Flymph

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Shotguns are pretty taboo in my family, all the shotguns my dad has considered are related to the Great War or Second World War... he’s bidding on 3 separate Stevens 520’s at the moment... LoL

I definitely looked at a 16gauge, and would have opted for that if the ammo was less expensive and easier to find. Maybe i’ll get a SxS in 16gauge one day, except I know it will happen eventually.

All of my BiMarts seem to be hotspots for Ammo... they get wiped out fast... but that’s where I can get the Federal loads for $4.50 a box.
 
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Shotguns are pretty taboo in my family, all the shotguns my dad has considered are related to the Great War or Second World War... he’s bidding on 3 separate Stevens 520’s at the moment... LoL

I definitely looked at a 16gauge, and would have opted for that if the ammo was less expensive and easier to find. Maybe i’ll get a SxS in 16gauge one day, except I know it will happen eventually.

All of my BiMarts seem to be hotspots for Ammo... they get wiped out fast... but that’s where I can get the Federal loads for $4.50 a box.
If you can find an old model 12 in 16 get it, they are one of the best handling shotguns ever made. Usually can be had for not too much either.
 
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I shot over/under shotguns for trap and bird hunting for many years. Using a light coat of grease on the hinge pin, the hinge pin recesses, and the area where the fore end slides on the receiver is important (I used Mil Tech grease). It is also important to use something like Never Seize on the threads of the choke tubes to insure they don’t become stuck. I believe Bruchwood Casey makes a product for this.

I bet you will love your new gun.
Been shooting O/U shotguns for 30 years. There is great wisdom in these words.
Beware of becoming addicted to Italian shotguns. It's easy to do and nearly impossible to maintain.

Bill.
 

bbbass

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7s, 8s, and 9s for clays and skeet, depending on distance... the 8s for home thrown and 16yd trap, the 7s for 27yd trap (although you can use 8s and a tighter choke) (modified choke for 16yd trap if you can get right on the bird, otherwise full choke), 9s for skeet because the distances are so close. I started out with 6s for pheasant and wound up going to 5s so the birds didn't just fly away or run when they drop. VERY IMPORTANT: if you are going to hunt other than doves, you really really really need a bird dog to find/flush/point/retrieve to not only improve your success rate but more so to cut way way way down on lost birds.

I've shot O/U shotguns for 40yrs... I highly recommend you research shotgun skills, it's not rifle shooting in that you swing thru a target or bird, you do NOT point at it. It will take awhile to learn how much to lead targets/birds, that is part of the fun. You could go to any range/club and pick the brains of the old guys, we love to share, er show off, our knowledge.

BTW, when it comes to target clays, stance and posture are also important. I'm concerned that you get a good start and therefore don't wind up having to unlearn bad habits.
 
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We shoot more shotguns than anything else. Mostly 12 ga but we have some 20 and 16 as well. 16 ga is fine but even in this day, ammo is an issue. You can usually find some but don’t have the verity that is commonly available for 12 and 20. All formal trap is shot with 12 gauge, Skeet used 12 gauge and smaller but both those are formal sports. Sporting clays are shot with whatever you like. 16 gauge ammo seldom goes on sale and reloading equipment is less available. A308 is correct, every time you break the gun down lubricate the lugs. Choose your grease carefully because some carry water. I shot on the USAF European trap team, we would frequently shoot 6 days a week 500 rounds or more a day. The numbers add up pretty quickly. I have seen Berettas shoot loose while Browning’s, Krieghof’s and Merkel’s rarely showed any wear. Few guns are ever shot that much but since then I have been suspect of Italian steel. Your gun looks lovely as many Italians and I am sure you will love it. I believe in starting with good equipment so while learning you can’t blame the gun and will concentrate on improving your own skills. Start with more open chokes, most people begin using chokes that are too tight. Also choke tube threads need a drop of lubracation when changed. Good luck shotgun shooting is addicting and your gun is very versitle. It will do anything you want. The sports are as technical as any golf game there is. join a trap club and shoot every week. It is great basic training and the people are fun.
 
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bbbass

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Oh, one of those spiral cleaning brushes, you don't even need hoppes when using one, although some CLP won't hurt. I also like a tube rag/mop for apply grease to the tubes for long term storage.

When you eventually buy a 20ga O/U for Huns/grouse/quail and such, you will fall in love with how quickly they point. This is why skeet guns go down to 28ga and even .410, although I was never a fan of .410 for skeet. Rabbits, yes.
 
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Oh, one of those spiral cleaning brushes, you don't even need hoppes when using one, although some CLP won't hurt. I also like a tube rag/mop for apply grease to the tubes for long term storage.

When you eventually buy a 20ga O/U for Huns/grouse/quail and such, you will fall in love with how quickly they point. This is why skeet guns go down to 28ga and even .410, although I was never a fan of .410 for skeet. Rabbits, yes.
That is all true but my 26” Merkel 12 gauge at 5 1/2 lbs points pretty quickly. We are not a skeet shootes, we have some light 20 gauges for my wife to carry in the field but she likes her 12 ga Superposed so much they rarely get exercise.
 

bbbass

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That is all true but my 26” Merkel 12 gauge at 5 1/2 lbs points pretty quickly. We are not a skeet shootes, we have some light 20 gauges for my wife to carry in the field but she likes her 12 ga Superposed so much they rarely get exercise.
:D:D:D

I've carried so many. Gotta love them all!!! The only one I didn't enjoy carrying was a Remington 3200... so heavy, but I shot it well. I didn't carry my 30" Charles Daly so much as transport it to the duck/goose blind, my A5 too. My fav to carry was the SKB 20ga O/U. But 12ga is so much of an advantage for larger or harder to kill birds. I learned quickly that the ease of carrying a 20 for chukar was overridden by the hardiness of the damned birds. I hate chukar hunting!!! Gotta have one leg shorter than the other, then you turn to go back and have to switch legs. Then you have one fly over your head, shoot straight up, and roll backwards down the hill. Meanwhile the chukar, even wounded, flies all the way down to the Snake River. I hate chukar hunting!!
 
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:D:D:D

I've carried so many. Gotta love them all!!! The only one I didn't enjoy carrying was a Remington 3200... so heavy, but I shot it well. I didn't carry my 30" Charles Daly so much as transport it to the duck/goose blind, my A5 too. My fav to carry was the SKB 20ga O/U. But 12ga is so much of an advantage for larger or harder to kill birds. I learned quickly that the ease of carrying a 20 for chukar was overridden by the hardiness of the damned birds. I hate chukar hunting!!! Gotta have one leg shorter than the other, then you turn to go back and have to switch legs. Then you have one fly over your head, shoot straight up, and roll backwards down the hill. Meanwhile the chukar, even wounded, flies all the way down to the Snake River. I hate chukar hunting!!
I have a 3200 as a gun for guests to shoot at the trap range. It is a lump but shoots well. I prefer my Krieghof 32. that is made on the same patents but that big old club absorbs a lot of recoil for someone that is sensitive and I don’t think you could wear it out. We have a Remington M17 that I had restored for my wife, 20 gauge, 5 1/4 lbs and a wonderful little known pre war gun. It is built on the Browning/Ithaca M37 patent downward ejection pre war. We fit it to her and thought she would use it a lot but every time we get ready to go out, she carries her old Superposed.
 

thorborg

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Everybody has their own plan when it comes to chokes. I started out with fixed most of my life until I got some with replaceable. Initially I tried them all and ended up with modified, with plans for this and that in the field, but the modified stuck and is all I have ever used since. I shoot 5 to 6 boxes of clays a year (at least) and have no problem hitting double throws.
Bird hunting however, (for me) rarely have I been productive on a second shot regardless of the choke. I just let them pass now saving the round and the possibility of wounding game. Now I just use modified. Be sure to remove the chokes for thread cleaning regularly whether you do a full clean or not as the unburnt and carbon deposits will soon make removal and cleaning more of an effort. As far as shooting clays go, if you are not competition, the lowest cost available in 2 3/4 " will give you the most training and fun for your money. look for case lots on sale, I buy a lot online,usually finding Kents, fiochi and a variety of others @ less then 20cents a round and though not for a while usually more like 15.
Once you are hitting every double set, is the time to mix up the offerings since then you will be radially able to ascertain the differences in brands, loads and chokes styles.
If you are using slugs, Improved gives me the best pattern and with minimal speed reduction albeit I use unrecommended full a lot on a fixed single shot without issue other than speed. Anything tighter than improved slows down the slug with full loosing several hundred according to my chrono.
Also I prefer rifled slugs in a smooth bore regardless of choke instead of slug / sabot in a rifled choke, rifled chokes rob speed by several hundred and nearly double that for a rifled slug in a rifled choke.
I do not own a rifled choke but a friend does and have Chronoed his and shot side by side with him. Obviously a rifled barrel would be best but then I don't live in Virginia so when I really want to reach out and touch something I use a real rifle!
My experiences are not scientific so are to be taken at face value;)
 

bbbass

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I have a 3200 as a gun for guests to shoot at the trap range. It is a lump but shoots well. I prefer my Krieghof 32. that is made on the same patents but that big old club absorbs a lot of recoil for someone that is sensitive and I don’t think you could wear it out. We have a Remington M17 that I had restored for my wife, 20 gauge, 5 1/4 lbs and a wonderful little known pre war gun. It is built on the Browning/Ithaca M37 patent downward ejection pre war. We fit it to her and thought she would use it a lot but every time we get ready to go out, she carries her old Superposed.
That's a good way to describe the 3200. I also enjoyed that one for duck/geese/rabbits. Never did get into Sporting Clays but I bet one would be good for that.

Women are funny that way.

I owned an Ithaca 37, used it a bunch for 16yd trap and also pheasant. Hadn't heard of the M17 before.

I always prefered shotgun sports and bird hunting because I got to shoot a lot compared to rifle sports. I averaged 10 boxes of shells on Saturdays.

@Flymph: you need a shotshell reloader. It's fun and easier than rifle/pistol.
 
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I feel the same about shotguns and they are much more versatile than rifles. I have 5 times as many rifles just to cover all the uses I have for them. Shotgun reloading is great. I started with an inexpensive Mec and after wearing that out bought a Ponsness and Warren 9000 from my cousin that owned the company. They say it will load 900 rounds an hour and works like a Swiss Watch. I only reload 12 gauge and rarely change anything but the shot size even for game shooting. Winchester AAA brass can be loaded to any 2 3/4 inch loading, even heavy magnums. I was hooked on Trap shooting at 6 years old after watching it being shot at the Hayden Lake country club. It is too bad so many great shooting venues have gone away. We would go to Sunday Brunch and sit at the windows where we could see the shooting. It always seemed far more useful and interesting than golf.
 

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