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Marlin 336 .35 Remington

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by Smitty619, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. Smitty619

    Smitty619 Portland, OR Member

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    I just bought a Marlin 336 .35 Remington.

    Stamped on the Rifle:
    The Marlin Firearms Co. New Haven Conn. U.S.A
    EST. 1870-Model 336 R.C.CAL. .35 REM. -Micro-Groove Barrel
    There is also a small JM stamped on the barrel.

    I would greatly appreciate any info you know about this rifle.

    I picked it up for $260. Good Deal? I'm in love with lever actions. Didn't think, just paid the man. ha.

    Thanks!
     
  2. KalamaMark

    KalamaMark Kalama Wa Well-Known Member

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    Great rifle. I shot my first deer with one, and my son owns it now.
    I wouldn't mind having another for me.. I'd give ya $265!
     
  3. I-Shoot

    I-Shoot Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I think you got a good deal (depending of course on the condition of the rifle). I inherited a 336/.35rem from my dad, it was still in the cardboard box he got it in, never fired. From recollection he got it around the time he retired, so it would have been early 1980's, and the box still had the discount store price tag on it, I think it was around $115. The MSRP for a new one is over $600, not sure what they actually go for, but I'd say your price is solid.

    If you call Marlin and give the CSR the serial number, they can tell you what year it was made. The JM stamp, I believe means that at least the part were made at the New Haven plant. I've read that when they became "Remlins", some older parts (still stamped JM) were shipped to the new plant and used in the first rifles to come off of that line.

    Bi-Mart sells the Hornady .35 Remington LeveRevolution ammo at a decent price, but Hornady seems to only produce it once a year before hunting season, so once a store is out, you might have to wait until the next summer to pick some more up.

    I love mine, it's a keeper.
     
  4. 2gr8dgs

    2gr8dgs oregon Active Member

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    Pictures!!!!
     
  5. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Micro Groove barrels can vary in accuracy but most are pretty good. They don't much like Lead bullets so stick to the Jacketed ones. The caliber is a great mid range hunting round capable of any deer or elk under 250 yards. Be a good caliber to reload for based on factory ammo costs.

    The 336 itself is an excellent strong quality made firearm if taken care of will handle hunting chores for a couple centuries.
     
  6. Dapapadon

    Dapapadon Gladstone, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The 336 serial numbers started with a letter in the 40s, went to 2 letters in the 60s, early 70s had the first 2 digits of the year after that you subtracted the first 2 digits from 100 to get the year made. (ie - ser. # 25###### would be 100 - 25 =75 or 1975) It's fairly easy to look up. Or post the first two letters or numbers of the serial number. The serial number on my 1958 336 starts with an R if I remember correctly.

    I'd say $260 was a real good price. Even if it needs a little work. Think I would of done the same, just paid the man & been on my way. Post some pictures if you can.

    Guess I should mention, lever guns seem to mutiply. It starts with one, then before you know it........
     
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  7. Smitty619

    Smitty619 Portland, OR Member

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    My serial starts with the letter Y and then 5 numbers after that.
    20140215_122109.jpg 20140215_122109.jpg

    20140215_122109.jpg
     
  8. Smitty619

    Smitty619 Portland, OR Member

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    20140215_122134.jpg

    20140215_122134.jpg
     
  9. Dapapadon

    Dapapadon Gladstone, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    From the Marlin Owners forum a "Y" serial number was made in 1964. From the photos it looks like you did pretty good. I believe the R.C. after 336 stood for regular carbine, short barrel with full length magazine tube. I believe my 58 is a "SC" sporting carbine. Same barrel length with a shorter magazine tube.

    Also looks like someone installed the sling stud in the "Bullseye" on the butt stock. Not a good thing to some Marlin guys. But it is what it is. It can be moved and there are replacements. Think I would leave it as is.
     
  10. I-Shoot

    I-Shoot Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    OK, this is curious to me. If that "bullseye" is not intended as a marker for where to put a sling stud, why does it exist at all? I don't understand why "Marlin guys" would object to putting one there.

    (And yes, one of the first things I did was purchase a sling stud and add that to the 336 I got from my dad, right were it would normally go, right where it appeared to me that Marlin left a convenient positioning marker...)
     
  11. Dapapadon

    Dapapadon Gladstone, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Had to check the safe. Both my guide guns (a Remlin & a JM barrel gun) and my 1894 .44 mag. have factory installed studs. All three are about 1" behind the bullseye. I've read that the bullseye was a Marlin trademark of sorts. It identified the gun or at least the stock as a Marlin. My 1958 336 someone installed the stud about 1-1/4" behind the bullseye and slightly off center. They didn't pilot drill the hole so it cracked the surface wood a little. If I ever decide to repair it I prefer this over having to replace the bullseye. For me repairing the wood would be easier that replacing the bullseye and trying to get the contour correct.

    I think I read somewhere Marlin recommended installing the stud 1" behind the bullseye as well. Can't find the link right now. The guys on the Marlin forum seem to be divided on this. But I think most prefer to have the original bullseye. Here's a recent discussion about it:
    Bullseye question

    If I had to have a sling on a Marlin that didn't have a stud I'd pilot drill and install it behind the bullseye. But that's just me. I don't hunt. I'm just a shooter, or plinker. So I don't really need a sling on my guns.

    For what it's worth, I always assumed the bullseye was for the stud location. It wasn't until I started doing some reading on the Marlin forum that I changed my mind.

    Sling stud or not Smitty got a good deal on the gun. I would have bought it myself. Regardless of where the stud was installed.
     
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  12. I-Shoot

    I-Shoot Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Dapapadon, thanks for the info, and I hope we didn't hijack the thread too much. I have no regrets for having popped mine out and used it as a convenient location for the stud, it made sense at the time, and still does. :)
     
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  13. Smitty619

    Smitty619 Portland, OR Member

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    20140218_220805.jpg

    20140218_220805.jpg
     
  14. Smitty619

    Smitty619 Portland, OR Member

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    20140218_220726.jpg

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  15. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yes, unfortunately, the "Marlin bullseye" (some call it a "bird's eye"), served frequently as an attractive "target" for the home gunsmith's drill in order that he could install sling swivels. It's really NOT a good place to do that, as the bullseye is merely glued in place, and the recess in the wood itself to accommodate the bullseye is actually pretty deep. This results in the sling swivel (or stud) not having the purchase it might otherwise have if attached to the buttstock wood itself. Integrity for regular sling usage is compromised.

    Restoring the trademark is not difficult, and the piece can be purchased readily. Contouring it to the stock is not beyond anyone with a modicum of patience, and preparation to protect the surrounding wood. The piece is shaped to near completion before installation, then finished to perfectly match contour while in place.

    The Marlin 336 may well be the most accurate centerfire lever action gun ever made. Apologies to Winchester Model 71 owners (certainly the "finest", and I am a proud owner), but the Winchester Model 71 cannot claim to have ever been accepted as a base action for benchrest guns (the Marlin can, and believe it or not had a pretty good following at one point for that task).

    The .35 Remington may seem turtle-pedestrian when compared to the ".268 WhipperSnapperUltraMag", and similar rounds listed in today's ballistic charts, but the good ol' .35's record in the field will hold its own against ANY cartridge for sure kills on game in North America. A 200 grain roundnose softpoint traveling at 2000fps (2100 if LeverEvolution is used) will plow its way deep into the chest cavity of any critter. Starting at .358 diameter, it most often becomes a .60-.90 caliber slug before it is done. Eat lead, Mister Bear.

    You got a good one, and for a song.
     
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  16. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A bevy of bird's eyes, and one ugly duckling:

    P2190564_zps21198213.jpg

    Left to right: Marlin 336 .30-30, Marlin Model 90 16ga over-under shotgun, Marlin Golden 39A .22lr, Marlin Model 62 .30 Carbine, Marlin Model 62 .256 Winchester, Marlin Model 1895 Guide Gun .45-70 Government, Marlin Model 1894 .357 Magnum. Note Marlin factory slings.

    Marlin factory rear sling swivel placement is demonstrated here on the 39, both Model 62's, and the Guide Gun. The little 1894 was a victim of having it's "bird's eye" poked out, and has yet to receive repair. Two other guns here have had their bird's eyes replaced. Can you tell which?