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Howard1955

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This an an unknown make .410 That has been in my family for close to 100 years. This was bought by my grandfather in the mid 1920's. The only markings are the serial numbers and "New York", and above the New York is a partial "AME". The old photo is my Father when he was 16, around 1933. Granddad started a walnut farm about six miles east of Amity, Or. just after the great depression. That's where I was taught to shoot the .410 and a Winchester 62A, ( which I also still have ) when I was eight years old. I'm now 70. Many squirrels and other rodents and birds fell to both those guns. The round count of that .410 must be huge. I shot it regularly up until 1985.

View attachment 824909 View attachment 824910 View attachment 824911 View attachment 824912

That’s great family history. Thanks for the post.
 

HaveGun

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Got a nice break-action shotgun for Christmas, so I better post it here...

1992 Ruger Red Label with custom stock, engraving, and blacking out of the receiver...

gplazfDURxajIuitfnBe-A.jpg
 
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Apologies for such a late response, I had forgotten this thread and didn't see your comment until today!:(

I don't recall what shotgun was used in that series, but I do know the full history of this one. The original owner was Jim White ( Who got it as a gift from his father) of White's Electronics Fame (the makers of some of the finest metal detectors around) and was involved in an unfortunate flood in the early 1940's and was almost scrapped along with all the other nice firearms that were damaged. My Grand Parents were hobbyist gun collectors and self taught Gun Smiths who became well known for their restorations and custom stock work. After the war, Grand Dad was sittin with the Whites ( they were friends/neighbors) jack jaw'n about this and that and the subject of the firearms misfortune came up, and they went and had a look at the guns and Grand Dad made Jim an offer to fix up several of them in trade for a Beautiful but damaged Winchester 1895 in .405 Win, and this A.H. Fox! After completing the rifles for Jim, who was very grateful, and very pleased at the level of craftsmanship that Both Grand Mom and Grand Dad had put into those rifles, that he kind of felt he was getting the better end of the bargain, so he also gifted Gramps a well worn original Colt Dragoon. Naturally, Gramps dove head first into the Winchester first, being both a Winchester aficionado, and a big admirer of the Big Medicine .405, as he saw the practicality of said when hunting his favorite Swamp Donkeys ( Roosevelt Elk) so that got their attention first! Finally, after many years in the back of the safe, the Fox came out for it's turn on the work benches, and they went all out on it, and rather then over do it, they chose to honor the original lines and simple elegance these Fox shotguns were known for! I have hunted this side by side over my old dearly departed Golden Retriever for several years since I retired, and have always been impressed with how well she swings and how naturally it follows through on the birds, and I have come to appreciate the very fanatical, yet small loyalty of these fine shotguns, and hope to continue to hunt with it for years to come! And Yes, all three of those firearms are now a part of my collection, the Winchester was the hardest to get, as My Grand Parents knew all us grand children would fight over Grand Dads most favorite hunting rifle, so they sold it, and I spent years tracking it down, finally talking the owner into selling it to me at WAY more then it was worth, but I didn't care, I had to have it, as part of the families legacy, and the rest of the grand kids are happy it's back in the family and they can hunt with it anytime they wish! I know the Grand Parents would be proud knowing their beloved firearms are still in the family, still being used as they were intended, and appreciated for the legacy they have built!


I just saw your reply here. I am late in responding too!

Thank you.

Cate
 
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This an an unknown make .410 That has been in my family for close to 100 years. This was bought by my grandfather in the mid 1920's. The only markings are the serial numbers and "New York", and above the New York is a partial "AME". The old photo is my Father when he was 16, around 1933. Granddad started a walnut farm about six miles east of Amity, Or. just after the great depression. That's where I was taught to shoot the .410 and a Winchester 62A, ( which I also still have ) when I was eight years old. I'm now 70. Many squirrels and other rodents and birds fell to both those guns. The round count of that .410 must be huge. I shot it regularly up until 1985.

View attachment 824909 View attachment 824910 View attachment 824911 View attachment 824912


Nice family history, shotgun story and pictures!

Thank you for sharing.

Cate
 
My grandson started trap shooting a month ago using a gun club Century III single barrel. Every time a different gun... What's Grandpa to do but buy one for him. Tim (@Velzey ) had one he was selling for a customer and I picked it up.
Tristar Upland Hunter with a Hydrodip camo job that Tim did. Also came with Carlson Cremator chokes and a Limbsaver pad. When we patterned it the bottom barrel shoots low, but the top's spot on. Works for us because he's only using one barrel. Between the ported chokes and the Limbsaver it doesn't kick much at all.
Wyatt's Tristar.jpg
Before I'd talked to Tim I'd already made arrangements to check out some guns from another friend. Decided it couldn't hurt because we want to shoot together. Stoeger Condor Ducks Unlimited. Shoots like a dream. Patterns extremely well. The only shotgun I've ever been able to hit a double with.
Stoeger Condor.jpg killin clays.jpg
 

ZigZagZeke

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This an an unknown make .410 That has been in my family for close to 100 years. This was bought by my grandfather in the mid 1920's. The only markings are the serial numbers and "New York", and above the New York is a partial "AME". The old photo is my Father when he was 16, around 1933. Granddad started a walnut farm about six miles east of Amity, Or. just after the great depression. That's where I was taught to shoot the .410 and a Winchester 62A, ( which I also still have ) when I was eight years old. I'm now 70. Many squirrels and other rodents and birds fell to both those guns. The round count of that .410 must be huge. I shot it regularly up until 1985.

View attachment 824909 View attachment 824910 View attachment 824911 View attachment 824912
Looks a lot like this one:


American Gun Co. - New York
 
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