Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Acorns.

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by lowly monk, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. lowly monk

    lowly monk Beaverton, Oregon. Just a guy. Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,229
    Likes Received:
    331
    Is anyone else processing acorns this season for storage and food ?
     
  2. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    I'd thought about it once, but then decided it was a squirrely idea.

    Sorry. I couldn't help myself. :laugh:
     
  3. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    936
    desktop_6_sm.jpg
     
  4. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,383
    Likes Received:
    156
    I am. Love the acorn flour griddle cakes and the occasional acorn soup.
     
  5. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    I do. I use them only for soup or as a nutty additive to things like bread or meatballs. The flour has no gluten and won't rise.

    The ones I get here have so much tannin in them that I have to leach them several times or they really taste bad and pucker the mouth, LOL. After shelling (with a hammer) I put them in the biggest pot we have. I fill the pot about 2/3 full of water and about 1/3 full of acorns. Then I bring it to a slow boil. The water turns dark and I pour it off, add more water and bring to a boil again. Sometimes I have to do that 4 or 5 times before the acorns taste good. (determined by tasting, LOL.)

    After the tannin is gone, I dry and roast them on cookie sheets in the oven at 300 degrees for about an hour until they are, well, dry and roasted. Too long and they will burn. Then when they cool I grind them up in a meat grinder (they are hard to grind) and then a large coffee grinder. I sift and get flour for soups and chunks for the nutty additive to other dishes.

    For those into survival, we know that starch is the hardest thing to find in the wild to eat. This is one good source.

    When collecting toss any that have a tiny hole (a larvae has formed into a worm which chewed it way out and the meat is ruined) and toss any that are missing their "tops." After that it's the luck of the draw as to whether any you crack open will still have a larvae in it.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  6. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,383
    Likes Received:
    156
    You leech before drying? I've always done the opposite. 's how my uncle taught me.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    I don't know which is correct or why. But, you do boil them to a completely soaked state when leaching so... ?????

    It's just what I was taught and it works for me. If there's a reason to dry them first, I'd be the first to want to learn about that. I just don't know.
     
  8. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,383
    Likes Received:
    156
    My full blood Cherokee uncle is the one who taught me, as I said, and he'd set the harvest up in the attic of his house right next to a window. They'd dry out eventually and then they'd be processed and ground. After he had a meal-sized grain then he'd cold water leech with a bit of vinegar. I'd guess that it was about a 6 or 8 hour process for the leeching. The water would get changed out when it wasn't clear anymore. Though I was sorta young I can still remember how heavy that damned pot was when we poured off the mash for drying. It's pretty involved but it's one crop you don't have to tend or feed, just harvest and process.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  9. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    Hmmm... I like all of mine better roasted. Like nuts, I like them better roasted. Mine works, so maybe there are two ways?

    If the shtf, your way wouldn't require any energy so then it would be better. I'm glad to know about it.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  10. eldbillbo

    eldbillbo clackamas New world samurai and a redneck none the less Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    3,183
    Likes Received:
    936
    And if the SHTF wouldn't the larvae just be a bonus bite of protein ?
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  11. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    If you've never seen one, you might think so, LOL. I'll roast those for you too.
     
  12. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    BTW, we have lots of oak trees on our property.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  13. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,383
    Likes Received:
    156
    I guess if you look at my method you can see how it was used in the way-back times I suppose. Modern ovens could probably do the leeching faster! Hmph, gonna have to try that this year.
     
  14. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    The way I do it (Leaching only) takes elapsed time due to several boilings, but the work itself is tiny. Classic hurry up and wait, so I do other things at the same time.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  15. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

    Messages:
    748
    Likes Received:
    130
    Acorns were a staple across the US and pioneers used the same methods. As a child I saw many rock holes where the acorns were ground and Leached along water courses. The finished product will fill a belly but I would opt for other fare. Fatty meat is always the preffered meal in a survival situation. If the wife wants a salad, cook the stomach.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  16. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Likes Received:
    836
    Your body needs starch and it's next to impossible to find enough in the wild. Your body converts it to sugars (carbs) for energy. Acorns are a great source of starch.
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  17. Sun195

    Sun195 Pugetropolis, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,081
    Likes Received:
    375
  18. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    51
    I love acorn crackers! Very low-energy processing: shell the acorn by simply smashing it and remove shell bits--pliers work well; grind or smash the soft green acorns into a coarse mush--it's not hard when they are not dried; pack into cheesecloth bags and soak in a clean flowing creek for a day, or some equivalent---maybe a rain downspout?; spread on a cookie sheet, score break lines, and bake until brown. If they are too hard make them thinner, or soak in milk. Scrumptious!............................elsullo
     
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.