Bodyguard 380 trigger job??

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by aarond, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. aarond

    aarond Member

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    Not positive this is the best place for this, but I think it'll work...

    I have a Smith & Wesson Bodyguard 380. It replaced my LCP.
    I love the sights, grip, sights, and the sights better on the bodyguard.
    (Guess why I got rid of the LCP...)

    Prior to shooting, I thought the bodyguard was God's gift to anyone wanting a small but usable 380...
    It felt great, natural point of aim was perfect, sight were great, laser was a fun perk... but.
    After shooting it, the trigger is much longer and heavier than I thought.
    I did alright, but not as well as I had hoped to.

    Anyone know anything about a trigger job or anything else to help the trigger?
    Yes, I'm sure practice and trigger control will help, but I'm still interested in a mod or trigger job...
    Thanks!
  2. BuckShot1118

    BuckShot1118 New Member

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    Thats my biggest turn off to this gun its also my daily carry when my wordrobe does not allow me to carry my glock 22 been thinking about trading in an trying out the S&W Shield in .40
  3. aarond

    aarond Member

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    Ditto. I like the glock 22 if possible, and if not, the glock 27 works well for me.
    I've considered the shield, but I do like the option of the super small size of the bodyguard...
  4. EJ20Legacy

    EJ20Legacy Member

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    Plenty of folks won't agree with this or simply aren't concerned, but I'm going to share my opinion here: I do not believe it is wise to modify the trigger on a gun carried specifically for self defense. Certainly not to make the trigger pull lighter. Grips, sights? Sure. Trigger and any safety mechanisms I would leave stock. If I ended up in court having to defend actions I took with my firearm, I would not want to provide the prosecution with any additional "ammo," regardless of how I feel about the subject and the realities of trigger pull weight on my mindset and the safety of the gun ("he modified the gun to shoot more easily and be even more deadly, which proves that he was just looking for an excuse to shoot someone").

    Some will argue that this is a myth and the prosecution doesn't go there. Some will say the prosecution rarely goes there. Some think it's regular practice. I don't really care... I won't risk it.

    That said, I personally like a long, heavy trigger pull on a self defense weapon. Especially one that might be pocket carried. I know the Bodyguard has a manual safety but that's not always the case, and when it isn't I'm even more in favor of a long, heavy pull. Just remember that it isn't a bullseye pistol and it isn't made for shooting X's at the range. If you can draw and put rounds in a silhouette at 3 to 15 feet then you're doing fine. The adrenaline and loss of motor control that [apparently] comes with a self defense situation makes a 10 lb trigger pull feel like a 2 lb pull and the last thing I'd want is accidently touching off a shot. Deliberate is okay.
    rocky3 and (deleted user) like this.
  5. aarond

    aarond Member

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    I'm familiar with what you are saying.

    I wouldn't put a hair trigger on it, but I would still rather a more easily managed trigger.
    I train with a lighter trigger. Yes, I can practice with it, and yes in the heat of the moment you aren't worried that the trigger is too heavy, but also in the heat of the moment you aren't holding as still as you do in front of a stationery piece of paper that isn't threatening your life, and I don't want to pull off target just because the trigger didn't break where I'm used to it breaking.

    What I'd prefer is a drop in trigger by a reputable manufacturer.
    They make drop in triggers for the M&P full size, compacts, and now the shield.
    They are made by a reputable company and I don't think the prosecutor will get anywhere with the trigger argument you mentioned because someone did the same thing to a bodyguard that cops and everyone else does to their M&P compact or shield.
    Unfortunately, I don't think they're going to make a drop in trigger for the bodyguard.