Messages
862
Reactions
1,671
Fox News Finger Guns GIF
Aw great, thanks RobMa. I thought I had it beat and now I have to start over 😪. - Hi. My name is Arrowshooter and I am a Megynaholic.

What were we talking about?
 
Messages
2,150
Reactions
4,966
It’s depressing to admit, but part of the reason I left Trash No Land and proceeded to get a Tri County membership, was witnessing way too much of this.
I'm with you on that. You will remember that I used to spend a great deal of time at the NFWC lanes since they were close to home. No more. Way too many negative experiences with other shooters.

Now, if I want to shoot, I use my Weyerhaeuser key or shoot on private lands.

-E-
 
Messages
16,294
Reactions
39,084
I dont want them in the woods either. Eventually they will get the woods shut down. I once had to tell some target shooters to please not shoot down the trail I came to hike that day. Apparently people think "the woods" is a suitable backstop.
That is why so many public spaces get posted. Stupid stuff but most of all the DAMN TRASH. Take a bunch of crap out to shoot it, drive off and leave the mess. The same damn people who do this then SCREAM when they return to find the place is now off limits. 🤬
 
Messages
7,907
Reactions
14,538
I learned hot range/cold range rules at Tri County many coon's ages ago.
And those are the rules we use now.
No gun handling whatsoever on a cold range.
We do allow mag loading.

I don't shoot with strangers, but if I did, the strangers would have to agree to those rules.
 
Messages
209
Reactions
170
Yep, Its been over 50 years ago I took that course and I still fondly remember it. The incentive for me back then was being able to buy my hunting license at that young age. I used to look forward to the nights we would get dropped off at the school for the class. End of it the instructors took all of us to a shooting range on a Saturday to shoot live ammo with .22 rifles. Sad that stuff like this can no longer be done :(
There are safety courses and there are safety courses.

I had a class years back that was a joke, but it qualified for my carry permit. Not too long after that I enrolled in a term long class at the Community College. That was much better.

After a life long shooting practice starting about 65 years ago, today I write/edit the rules for my local club. Even with all the rules, training, range master supervision being available, we still get the shooter form the public and even the occasional member that scares the daylights out of me.
 
Messages
1,380
Reactions
2,726
The problem with this is all you have to do is drive during rush hour. All those vehicles are being driven by people who showed competency to be able to drive:eek:
most people drive cars a lot more than they shoot. that's the wisdom and experience of us old farts. :)
(and vehicles certainly kill more people than guns)

as far as stupid, i guess it doesn't matter the tool.
 
Messages
16,294
Reactions
39,084
most people drive cars a lot more than they shoot. that's the wisdom and experience of us old farts. :)
(and vehicles certainly kill more people than guns)

as far as stupid, i guess it doesn't matter the tool.
Vehicles sure do kill a LOT more. As with guns vehicles seem to often be death machines with older people behind the wheel too often. I rarely see "new drivers" causing deadly wrecks. Normally its someone who has been driving a long time and knows better. They have been driving a long time and start to think they are expert. Until they kill. We see a great example of this here when we get a good snow. It is not common here. Many winters we get none. So when we get a good snow and ice? The really bad wrecks are seldom some young new driver. Its older drivers, in 4wheel drives, flying down the road until they cause a huge pile up. :mad:
 
Messages
17,334
Reactions
36,417
Vehicles sure do kill a LOT more. As with guns vehicles seem to often be death machines with older people behind the wheel too often. I rarely see "new drivers" causing deadly wrecks. Normally its someone who has been driving a long time and knows better. They have been driving a long time and start to think they are expert. Until they kill. We see a great example of this here when we get a good snow. It is not common here. Many winters we get none. So when we get a good snow and ice? The really bad wrecks are seldom some young new driver. Its older drivers, in 4wheel drives, flying down the road until they cause a huge pile up. :mad:
If that's the case someone should telling the insurance companies they have to lower that high rates they charge the kids!

SNAP!

 
Messages
16,294
Reactions
39,084
If that's the case someone should telling the insurance companies they have to lower that high rates they charge the kids!

SNAP!

No expert on the algorithms the insurance agencies use to set costs. From what I have seen I tend to wonder if its not that many of the young get in a LOT of wrecks that cost cash.? When I was commuting across the county every day most of the amazing stupid I used to see was not young people, at least when I could see the driver. I guess a lot of them just get lucky they go for a good while before they finally get in one of the really spectacular wrecks. The crap I used to see on I5 had me wondering why there was not massive wrecks daily up there. I got so used to it that it was just "normal" to me. Couple times the wife was with me on the drive and would be a nervous wreck by the time we got done. She was sitting there in amazement watching the people who if it took 60 minuets to get to work would leave 40 minuets before and try to make up that time on the road. :eek:
I suspect things have changed since I was young but remember well just getting married was HUGE. At 19 I had two moving violations under my belt. Liability only for my vehicle was $600 which was a lot of money then. Got married and suddenly for two drivers and two vehicles it was under half that. Have not gotten a ticket is decades now but suspect they still probably really nick the people who rack up tickets and or wrecks now days even when they get to the "mature" age??
 
Messages
4,029
Reactions
10,339
I've come to believe that most of what we do is just habit. I had my times when I drove too fast when I was young, but for the most part I was always a pretty conservative driver. I learned from my parents who were also careful on the road. In the 3.5 decades that I've been behind the wheel, I've never caused a wreck, and I've received exactly one ticket (23 years ago, 30mph in a 20).

I rode with a coworker recently who's older than me. He's a very aggressive driver, obviously very proud of his "skills", cutting through traffic, rolling through stop signs, making me nervous. We were talking later about driving, and he made a comment about getting tickets "every other week" when he was young. To him that was just normal; it's how he's always driven, probably how his parents drove. He clearly looks down on slowpokes like me. What's the point? So he gets to work 20 seconds before me. Big deal.

All I'm saying is that sometimes we need to slow down a little and think about why we do thing the way we do. Most of the time it's just the way we've always done it, no logical reason otherwise. I used to be one of those guys shooting out in the hills. I wouldn't usually contribute to the junk, but hey, everyone else leaves junk here, what difference does it make? So the backstop is just a bunch of trees. Everyone else has been shooting here for years, must be OK? It took me a long time to realize that no, it's not OK.

I have extensive quarterly safety training at work: driving safety, hazardous materials, fire, high voltage, cranes and rigging, confined spaces, fall protection, etc. (much of it doesn't apply to my job very often). Over the years it has really sunk in and we have a very good safety culture. Statistically, accidents can be avoided and lives saved by simply learning and following basic safety rules. The firearm-owning community has a foundation of a very good safety culture that has been nurtured and built on for decades, and believe it or not, gun accidents have statistically been on the decline over the course of a century. Bringing new shooters into that safety culture and teaching them the life-and-death importance of it is the challenge.

Some people will obstinately refuse to acknowledge safety and just aren't going to change. In my line of work, they get fired. Out on the range, the best we can do is stay away from them.
 
Messages
17,334
Reactions
36,417
When it come to traffic fatalities, the younger lead. It makes sense. At that age the experience it takes to know how far you can push things hasn't been developed yet. What I'm personally experiencing NOW when I drive, all bets are off on all statistics. People don't care anymore. People do not take driving serious. Too many people no longer consider others that are also on the road. It may not of changed so much in other states, or other area's of Oregon.

Insurance when I was young? On mom and dads of course until 18. At 18 got my own car and was with the same guy my folks were. I don't remember if I had to buy my own or was still included. At 21, moved out to live with a girlfriend. bought a new car. WE needed to get insurance on that. State farm was CRAZY! Went to Allstate (Sears). They wouldn't insure us because we weren't' married! Lived in Utah. LOL Called a guy I knew from my job at the gas station when I was 16. A Sate Farm agent. He said, "Well if you were planning to get married" Well, SURE. Been with 'em ever since. Four glass claims over all these years. I wat to say, three, moving violation tickets? It's just too damned easy to NOT get tickets. I don't get it? Used to be cops on the road keeping the lunatic drives somewhat mellow. Now? All bets are off. And I've been driving the same way for many years. I'm comfortable with that.

I'll add, people who think they are being safer by going under the speed limit. Wondering why everyone else has to be in such a hurry. No one has the right to hold people up. That's (MY time) time. It's plain wrong for someone else to decide how you spend your own personal time. Go any speed you want, when there's no one behind you. Pull over or pick it up. I won't do that to people, I expect the same from everyone else.
 
Messages
5,950
Reactions
9,924
I've come to believe that most of what we do is just habit. I had my times when I drove too fast when I was young, but for the most part I was always a pretty conservative driver. I learned from my parents who were also careful on the road. In the 3.5 decades that I've been behind the wheel, I've never caused a wreck, and I've received exactly one ticket (23 years ago, 30mph in a 20).

I rode with a coworker recently who's older than me. He's a very aggressive driver, obviously very proud of his "skills", cutting through traffic, rolling through stop signs, making me nervous. We were talking later about driving, and he made a comment about getting tickets "every other week" when he was young. To him that was just normal; it's how he's always driven, probably how his parents drove. He clearly looks down on slowpokes like me. What's the point? So he gets to work 20 seconds before me. Big deal.

All I'm saying is that sometimes we need to slow down a little and think about why we do thing the way we do. Most of the time it's just the way we've always done it, no logical reason otherwise. I used to be one of those guys shooting out in the hills. I wouldn't usually contribute to the junk, but hey, everyone else leaves junk here, what difference does it make? So the backstop is just a bunch of trees. Everyone else has been shooting here for years, must be OK? It took me a long time to realize that no, it's not OK.

I have extensive quarterly safety training at work: driving safety, hazardous materials, fire, high voltage, cranes and rigging, confined spaces, fall protection, etc. (much of it doesn't apply to my job very often). Over the years it has really sunk in and we have a very good safety culture. Statistically, accidents can be avoided and lives saved by simply learning and following basic safety rules. The firearm-owning community has a foundation of a very good safety culture that has been nurtured and built on for decades, and believe it or not, gun accidents have statistically been on the decline over the course of a century. Bringing new shooters into that safety culture and teaching them the life-and-death importance of it is the challenge.

Some people will obstinately refuse to acknowledge safety and just aren't going to change. In my line of work, they get fired. Out on the range, the best we can do is stay away from them.
I dunno. Habit is one thing but lack of intelligence (or lack of common sense) is another. Once had a caretaker for family member who knocked on the front door for 15 minutes because it was locked (it was always kept locked during the day). Finally called me in frustration for help to get in. I suggested she go in the back door (which was always unlocked during the day). It just never occurred to her. This was after like 1 year working there. I couldn't believe it.

You can't fix stupid.
 
Last Edited:
Messages
8,033
Reactions
13,769
Out on the range, the best we can do is stay away from them.
For our safety yes, but for our priveledge to shoot on public lands not so much. Our priveledge to shoot most anywhere on public lands is a huge benifit to gun owners that most take for granted. If we lose it.... Well hopefully everyone already has a range membership.
 
Messages
4,029
Reactions
10,339
I'll add, people who think they are being safer by going under the speed limit. Wondering why everyone else has to be in such a hurry. No one has the right to hold people up. That's (MY time) time. It's plain wrong for someone else to decide how you spend your own personal time. Go any speed you want, when there's no one behind you. Pull over or pick it up. I won't do that to people, I expect the same from everyone else.
When I said my coworker looked down on "slowpokes" like me, I didn't mean to imply that I was one of those drivers who drives the speed limit in the fast lane, or putts along at 10mph under on county roads, with a dozen cars behind them. Speed is far from the only factor when it comes to safety. I typically drive the speed limit or a little over with the flow of traffic, and do my level best to just stay out of the way. The speed at which others drive is not my business; when I'm behind the wheel my responsibility is the safety of those in my car. Annoying or angering other drivers does nothing to improve safety.
 
Messages
3,894
Reactions
7,552
I wonder what % of new gun owners know the four rules of gun safety? And how many of those actually practice it religiously?

To us that have been shooting a long time hopefully it is automatic. But what about the newer gun owners?
my dad beat that into me.. not litterly.. but he would get mad when I would play war with my friends.. cause we were pointing toy guns at eachother
 
Messages
2,966
Reactions
6,900
A safe driver is only safe until he meets an unsafe driver. The roads belong to the public. This is exactly the point about gun safety. There are other shooters on the range. There are other shooters in the woods. Shooting can be dangerous. Driving can be dangerous. Your needs are not more important than anyone else's safety.
 
Messages
2,349
Reactions
2,822
I’m not taking sides… safety is important… playing with a firearm or mags around someone else that happens to be down range is kinda rude and disrespectful… however, I don’t think that being over amped up over things is also rude and disrespectful to others… kinda like how we are all part of this community… voicing your thoughts or concerns or opinions on things is healthy for the good of all … just remember that we all have a different take on things… personally keep the booger hooker out of the trigger guard and I’m usually ok with things… if I’m down range from you then please out of respect for me don’t touch anything… but I also don’t act like a National Socialist Totalitarian safety officer to others… I just point out the situation and the personal problems that I have and either they respect it or not but I don’t have to spend my time or money there either. I have found that yelling and screaming causes me to look like the fool and I lose my credibility
 
Last Edited:
Messages
17,334
Reactions
36,417
When I said my coworker looked down on "slowpokes" like me, I didn't mean to imply that I was one of those drivers who drives the speed limit in the fast lane, or putts along at 10mph under on county roads, with a dozen cars behind them. Speed is far from the only factor when it comes to safety. I typically drive the speed limit or a little over with the flow of traffic, and do my level best to just stay out of the way. The speed at which others drive is not my business; when I'm behind the wheel my responsibility is the safety of those in my car. Annoying or angering other drivers does nothing to improve safety.

Oh please don't think I was insinuating anything about your driving. It sounds like we drive pretty much the same. You just brought it up and reminded me that I wanted to comment on the attitude I see so much. The attitude of, "I'll just do whatever I want and to hell with everyone else." I think those kind actually get pleasure and enjoyment of being in control. Personally, I'm extremely sensitive to holding others up, or realizing I have to get in at the last moment when I should have known to be in another lane ahead of time. I'm a stickler for signaling my moves to other drivers. I would drive past my turn and come back the other way rather than stop and wait for a break while making others wait.
 
Last Edited:

Upcoming Events

2A Rally at the Capitol
Salem, OR
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Chehalis, WA
Wes Knodel Gun Shows
Redmond, OR

Latest Resource Reviews

New Classified Ads

Back Top