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My Father entered the 1st Oregon air National Guard in 1940. The guard was federally activated into the AAF in April 1941. He eventually landed at Utah Beach in Normandy, and he carried this throughout his service from Portland Or. to the outskirts of Berlin. He was issued this knife/sword sometime after the start of WWII.

This is a WWII Anderson Combat Fighting Knife/Stiletto with the original Sheath. Built from the 1913 Patton Saber Blade tip, made in the USA, in Glendale, Ca.

The WWII Anderson fighting knife was made from surplus WWI era M1913 Cavalry Sabers, manufactured by Springfield Arsenal in 1914.
Each of these fighting daggers were built from three sections of the original M1913 saber. These are referred to as the “Patton Sword”, as the original M1913 Calvary Saber was developed by General George S. Patton prior to WWI. These have also been refereed to as “non-regulation” US fighting knifes.

The Kabar Marine fighting knife didn't enter service till Nov.1942, consequently, during the first year of WWII the US had no standard-issue fighting knife and the military was desperately looking for a quick way to fill the demand for fighting knives early in the War. So someone came up with the idea of re-purposing these old Cavalry Sabers into fighting knives and daggers. A large quantity of Patton Swords and even older Civil War sabers were converted into somewhat crude, but very practical fighting knives and trench daggers. These intimidating “Patton Sword” fighters were made by a few American makers during the war, including Anderson of Glendale, California. This particular dagger is 13 1/4“ long, with an 8 1/4“ long blade. I remember playing with this as a small kid. Yes, I got in trouble for that. Considering its age and history, it’s in very good condition. I’ve seen a similar one sell for over $700.00, Various condition examples can go any where from $375. to $575.


Anderson4 small.jpg Anderson5 small.jpg Anderson6 small.jpg
 

Bon Sauvage

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A good post and an interesting history. I sure wish they hadn't f'd up all those swords though. :(
 
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Historic weapons probably wasn't on their minds when they conjured up this idea to whack big swords into small ones. It was just a ways to a means. Hind sight is always 20/20. Kind of like Monte Cassino. Seemed like a good idea at the time.
 
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revjen45 asked-
What is the handle material? Cast aluminum?

Iv'e never read anything describing what material the handle is made of, but upon close visual inspection is looks like a hard plastic. There is a very slight mold line around the center of the handle. So the knife was molded to the handle, and this divot at the pommel end is probably where the injection point for the mold was. It's just a guess, but that's all I have to go on.

Anderson handle.jpg
 

Siglvr

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Great history share. Thank you Phred.
 
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