Would you have any reservations firing a colt 1911a1 made in 1941?

jbett98

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I had member gunsmith Velzey repark my Remington Rand because someone in the past decided to strip the finish on the flats surrounding the slides roll marks.
Luckily, they didn't touch any of the roll marks. Never did figure out why they started messing with it.
I had to install a period correct taller rear sight as it hit dead on for windage, but 8" low on elevation.
Now it's right on at 50'.


remington rand 001.JPG



remington rand 002.JPG
 
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Thats a beautiful piece of history there, I would shoot it but not +P or anything above the ammo of its era, keep it to FMJ and your fine.
 
I shoot a 1875 saa fairly regularly and have several early 1900s Winchesters that I feel completely safe with, To be honest I load the 45 light, but I still shoot it and its irreplaceable to me. That is a nice 45 though.
 

gmerkt

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For many years, I had a US Army 1911 made in 1918. It was Parkerized, so had been rebuilt for WW2, no doubt saw lots of use over the years. The slide was worn with some peening underneath at the back where it re-cocks the hammer after every shot. Nevertheless, I added hundreds of shots to its cumulative round count and it never gagged. I'd think if a gun has collector or sentimental value, caution is urged. I have a Walther P.38 from WW2, perfectly functional, but it isn't my main 9mm blaster.
 

JHPeck

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I've been known to shoot my Mauser M96 Broomhandle from time to time. Going by it's serial number, it was made about 1910. Had it thoroughly checked out before I ever shot it, only thing that was really worn was the rifling. And since I shoot it for fun, not competition, I don't much care if it's accuracy isn't what it once was.
 

SUPER X

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Its probably better built than a lot of new pistols and far more class. Id look the barrel over and if it looked good have some fun with it. put some factory brass cased 230 ball down the tube.. it looks great for its age. and has that proud American history that we don't see anymore but by a few.
 

tac

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Until 1997 I used to shoot a 1916 Navy M1911 and 1917 Army issue ditto. I still shoot rifles made during your Civil War and later. When I'm over in Oregon I shoot another M1911 - dated to 1915. It shoots really well- except for the bane of all the early models - a foresight that you need a microscope to detect.....
 

The Heretic

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My father's Remington Rand was WWII era and we shot it from time to time. Ditto with the M1 Carbine. Not sure, but I think his Springfield '03 may be older than that. Pretty sure the Model 94 is too. They all got shot and I would still shoot them. Nothing wrong with WWII era guns.
 

FourTeeFive

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My father in law has a 1911 made in 1913. It is basically "in the white" at this point. I need to give it a full strip and inspection one of these days. A buddy of mine who is a very meticulous gunsmith has told me that the old ones are a bit soft due to the manufacturing technology, so he doesn't recommend particularly hot loads.
 
OP
S
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My father in law has a 1911 made in 1913. It is basically "in the white" at this point. I need to give it a full strip and inspection one of these days. A buddy of mine who is a very meticulous gunsmith has told me that the old ones are a bit soft due to the manufacturing technology, so he doesn't recommend particularly hot loads.
As a guess what would the max load you would put in?
 

ATCclears

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We have the 1911 of my wife's Grandfather from WWI (1918). The pistol sat for a very long time so I had the gunsmith give it a good once over. The pistol shoots fine but it is mostly a safe queen now.
 
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Personally I would continue shooting it. Just learn how to clean it yourself. It is not that difficult to clean a 1911.

As to the one poster saying it was made for Lieutenants is incorrect. Those were issued to many folks not in the Infantry ie Pilots, bomber crews and armor (tanks).

I would stay clear of PlusP ammo, or lighter bullets and shoot 230 gr ball ammo out of it.
 

Andy54Hawken

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As noted by many...I'd shoot it.
I'd shoot it using 230 grain FMJ ammo and not worry 'bout it.

I carried a 1911A1 during the Invasion of Panama as well as during Desert Shield / Storm.
There were no new 1911A1's issued since 1945...any of them issued after WWII , were WWII vintage.
Mine served me well and had no issues.
Andy
 

Bon Sauvage

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The only problem is the slide is soft. The locking lugs and bolt face were induction hardened, that's it. They were issued to Lt.'s (30 day wonders) with an average expected lifespan of, you guessed it, 30 days, so who cared if the slide wore out in 500 to 1000 rds? The gun is (probably) safe, but take it to a competent gunsmith and have it looked over if worried. If it was mine (mine was made in 1914, WWII bring back), I'd clean it carefully, give it a good coat of rust preventive and put it somewhere safe and look at it. Plenty of good 1911s floating around to risk a "sentimental piece" with wear and tear.
Interesting. I have never heard of a 30 day wonder other than a book about aliens invading earth. I have heard of a 90 Day Wonder (90 Day Blunder) which were 2nd Lt.s that had gone through a crash training course of 90 days to become officers and gentlemen during WWII. It had nothing to do with life expectancy though.
 
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As noted by many...I'd shoot it.
I'd shoot it using 230 grain FMJ ammo and not worry 'bout it.

I carried a 1911A1 during the Invasion of Panama as well as during Desert Shield / Storm.
There were no new 1911A1's issued since 1945...any of them issued after WWII , were WWII vintage.
Mine served me well and had no issues.
Andy
And all this time Andy I thought you were with Colonel Roosevelt in Cuba. My bad ... LOL.
 

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