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Worst Abuse of A Gun You have Experienced/Seen/Heard Of

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RVTECH, Sep 21, 2014.

  1. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    We needed something new and I was thinking about this the other day. My own was a few years ago at a garage sale I had and I had couple guns out for sale. A guy says "I see you are interested in guns" and tells me he has an "Old Army .45" for sale and says he will bring it over later. He returns and hands me a 1911. I can barely make anything out because it was SANDED BRIGHT WHITE! I was able to make out the remains of 'Model of 1918' and little else.
     
  2. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    Seeing my coworkers grandfathers old inherited shotgun hacked down to 18" (well less than that) to fulfill an HD role. (He had to toss the barrel, he thought barrel laws were all 16")

    When there are 18" HD shotguns for $130-200

    I cringed..

    Also taking any surplus rifle and dunking it into a SH** tapco stock setup with all the "keeeewl" gadgets.
    AND STILL not run it well. Cant buy proficiency.
     
    BDA.45 likes this.
  3. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    I saw a pigeon grade Citori that somebody backed over with their truck. Broken, bent and just generally FUBARed afterwards.
    Does that count?
     
  4. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    In 1988 when I was 17 years old my granddad gave me a Marlin octagon 1893 30/30 with a 4 digit serial number. It is/was a case colored rifle which I thought was discoloration ( I didn't know any better) so I scrubbed it all down with steel wool to make it more consistent.

    The only good part of the story is I still have it.
     
    Dr.Z, WilliamIV and Certaindeaf like this.
  5. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Ha this made me remember a similar situation. Several years ago a friend of mine took a shotgun in trade for some auto repair work he did (he had a shop) I stopped in and he showed it to me - a Mint Ithaca mod 37 (I think) Featherlight 12 ga. Well guess what he did? I could hardly contain myself - I told him I would have gladly traded him a already cut off SG if that was all he wanted!
     
    ZA_Survivalist likes this.
  6. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

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    When I was in the army, as the 45B20 I would get all the small arms to repair so I have some good stories!
    one time an M-110 SP gun crew used the travers ring as a rifle rack and traversed the gun right across the barrels of their M-6A1s.
    another time, during winter, 3 AAs stole a 2.5 ton truck loaded w/weapons inside Graffenvere training area (yeah, I know not very bright). They were soon chased by MPs and to slow the cops down started throwing weapons at them. The following year my unit was marching down the same road in mid-summer, a GI spotted a 1911A1 holster in the mud of the ditch, there were actually 2 Colts. The silt and algae and had bonded the Parkerizing to the leather, the guns were full of silt as well. It took all night boiling the guns and beating on them w/a boot to separate and clean them but I fired them the next day.
    I saw a Rem. 720 that the owner never cleaned, he loaded a reloaded round in the chamber and then could not open the bolt, put a pipe on the bolt and snapped the bolt handle off. I drilled out the bullet with a long drill, removed the firing pin spring and someone else soldered the bolt handle back on to open it
     
  7. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I can't remember which, either I read or someone told me of a Winchester 94 being loaned out and coming back having obviously been used as a pry bar.
     
  8. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    Yep, I think a Winchester 94 would be the most expensive and least effective pry-bar you would ever own.
     
  9. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    Ok but lets not forget our OWN 'abuses' - MANY moons ago while I was stationed at Tinker AFB, OK I lived out of town and had an old pit a couple hundred yards behind my house we would shoot in. Anyway I had been shooting my M19 Smith and walked back to the house and took off my 'rig' (leather holster and belt with the appropriate cartridge loops) and slung it on my bed headboard where it 'lived' - and forgot about it for two weeks! - in the summer - in Oklahoma! I was able to get about 85% of the rust off but it had a permanent 'mottled' stain on the bluing.
     
  10. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    I shot probably 30,000 proof loads (super hot handloads where the primer would pretty much fall out after that shot with new brass) out of a beer can
    target sighted Belgian made Browning Hi-Power.
    Also used to shoot a Remington Model 600 Mohawk .243 loaded with old school black powder. I'd clean it with water and gun oil within minutes of doing so though.. that was one accurate rifle.
     
  11. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I heard of a pleace that sold a gun to a liberal.
    It was sick and disturbing. I still have nightmares about what that gun went through
     
  12. marty8587

    marty8587 NE Portland Active Member

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    My Uncle gave me my grandfathers Winchester 1906 and I hid it upstairs in the attic behind some insulation. When I got it out it was covered in rust. Needless to say I was sick over it, so I took it to Murrys out on Sandy Blvd. and payed him what seemed like a small fortune to do what he could. The gun came out beautiful and still shoots great, but it's not quite the same.:(
     
  13. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I bought a marlin 12ga goose gun with a shattered stock and bent barrel.

    I know I'm cutting the barrel down to 18 1/2" and havn't decided on the course of action on the stock...

    That's about the worst of my indiscretions if you don't count not cleaning all of the guns I took shooting the same day.
     
  14. CoastRange57

    CoastRange57 Western Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I went back to Delaware to meet a potential business partner about 12 years ago. We had been exploring this venture online and by phone, so we decided to meet up. I went to his place outside Chesapeake City, and we toured his farm, and all and came back to his house. A salesman stopped by to try and sell him a tractor, so I was looking around in his Kawasaki Mule and came across your basic Mossberg 500, completely caked in mud, and very dirty. I pulled it out, cleared it with some effort, and he said, " Hey that is the black stick of death on coyotes". I told him that thing would not shoot in a week.

    The salesman was laffing about it, I took it over to the faucet and hosed it off with a nozzle. I took it apart, blew it out, wiped it down and put it back together, hosed down the ammo, put a round in it and blasted a couple of starlings with it. Him and the sales person laughed about it, and I said do not throw the gdamn this back in the back of the Mule again.

    This pretty much set the stage for our friendship over the next 12 years, and we still laugh about it. Our business dealings dissolved some years ago, but we remain good friends. Piled up a few Delaware monster whitetails back there for a few years.
     
  15. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I know where you can get the case color restored.
     
  16. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    I have two of them:

    1. My dad inherited his father's octagon barreled, #1 rolling block sporter in .38 Long RF made in 1873 or so. There was a story and a pair of buffalo horns that went with it. The story being that Uncle Jake, grandfather's older brother, who would have been 32 years old at the time of Little Big Horn had taken it with him on a river boat up the Rosebud River, where he'd met Custer and shot buffalo with the rifle. When I inherited it from my dad it had been thoroughly steel wooled by somebody. Over the years it had been converted to fire .38 centerfire cartridges by drilling a second firing pin hole in the breech block and bending the original firing pin to follow the new hole. The chamber had been threaded with a tap to knurl the walls and make for a tighter fit for what I presume would be .38 spc cartridges. On top of that it had been in a house fire and the butt stock was charred on one side and the fore stock was completely missing. I took it to a custom rifle maker in WA and for about $2500 had it completely restored down to the case coloring on the receiver and new wood. We also lined the barrel and chambered it for .357 Mag. I've posted numerous pics of it here on NWFA.

    2. At a gun show in about 1975 I found a 1950's era Colt 1911 on which someone had used metal stamps to write "Rosie" on every available flat surface. It must have had "Rosie" stamped on it 100 times. From a few feet away it looked like it was fully engraved. My buddy, who was working as an apprentice gunsmith at the time, ended up buying it for $50. He took it and used it to practice his engraving skills. He was actually able to resurrect it by engraving over the stamp work. It came out looking pretty decent.
     
  17. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    That might be worth doing, If it was the only one of my grandfathers guns I would probably be more concerned about it but I have a number of them.

    Actually recently the opportunity for me to have some of my great grandfathers guns became a reality. My great grandfather remarried and had several kids with his new wife. One of Those kids got all his guns (which was an extensive collection, probably 80, most of which where museum pieces) Thankfully the entire collection has stayed together and is now with my second uncle. His kids have no interest in them and he said I could buy a few out of the collection before they hit the chopping block. I want one for each of my boys and one for myself just for sentimental reasons.

    Pretty amazing to me really, To be able to give my boys something that belonged to there great, great grandfather.

    My great, great grandfather was hung by vigilantes in Prineville in 1882 at the age of 31 years old. He had shot two men who he had a property dispute with (he claimed they where putting fence up on his land) The law came out and got him and took him into custody but during the night a group of vigilantes came and got him, drug him behind a horse by his neck and hung him over a bridge to die. They also hung my great granddads hired man who had nothing to do with any of it.

    Its really a pretty interesting story. There is lots written about it, If you have any interest you can look up
    "Prineville Vigilantes" or
    “Crook County’s Reign of Terror,”
     
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  18. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    My father in law placed his ice cold '94 Winchester .30-30 octagon barelled take down rifle (not carbine) and a Winchester M-1200 12ga shotgun in plastic soft cases and put them behind the wood stove! Then he forgot about them. Rust buckets describes them best!:(
     
  19. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I was remodeling a basement for an older couple when a firearm was uncovered that was hidden up in the floor joists.
    Turns out it was a Colt M1917 .45 revolver that was carried by the women's grandfather in WW l.
    Excellent condition, fully loaded and in the original Army holster.
    While I was at lunch, the homeowner decided to get rid of the evil gun and took it to the Gun Room on Foster Rd in a paper sack.
    He walked in, laid it on the counter and said "I don't want this gun, please get rid of it for me."