Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

Wolves In Oregon

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by turq, Apr 13, 2010.

  1. turq

    turq Molino,oregon Member

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    7
    Great article in the Oregon Capital Press about the western wolf harvest.
    In Montana and Idaho they did not reach the tag maximum tag limit.
    Montana tag limit 75 Taken 72
    Idaho tags 220 taken 188; Season was Sept. 1-March 31
    ID.State issued 26,428 tags and they cost $11.75 each =$293,879.30
    Can my pencil math be right?
    Over a Quarter of a Million for 188 wolves that could be had for FREE tomorrow
    in Canada where they are hunted with NO TAG; No License, No limit.

    Thanks for bringing 1928 S*** into Oregon to kill off our Elk/deer herds and STOP HUNTING!
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2010
  2. coyote223

    coyote223 NW Oregon Stamp Collector,,,

    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    512
    Thats gonna be their cash cow, after most the big game Animals are killed off by all the Protected Predators. :paranoid:
     
  3. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan Oregon City, Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,351
    Likes Received:
    336
    A guy in my party saw a wolf on a gut pile in the Malhuer unit year before last. You think cats and bears affect elk/deer mortality rates, just wait till these things get some numbers behind them. It isn't going to be good.
     
  4. mortre

    mortre Yelm, WA Active Member

    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    33
    Try reading this book. Very interesting.

    Where the Wild Things Were: Life, Death, and Ecological Wreckage in a Land of Vanishing Predators

    Also, look into the effects of wolves on Pronghorn in the southwest. Re-Introduction of wolves has increased the number of Pronghorn. I'm a big believer that re-introduction of wolves will do a lot to help our Elk and deer. Wolves (native to the pac-north west) will help remove the non-native predators (coyote) that hurt the Elk/Deer numbers more than the wolves do.
     
  5. Boom

    Boom Pierce Co. New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2
  6. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,191
    Likes Received:
    4,377
    How does that song go that I heard at Disneyland again?

    Fairy tales can come true, it could happen to youuuu, if you're young at heart,........
     
  7. chainsaw

    chainsaw East side of Or. Active Member

    Messages:
    495
    Likes Received:
    113
    I think I heard of someone seeing one in Lake county this winter or last fall.
     
  8. Ben Beckerich

    Ben Beckerich NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    3,907
    Likes Received:
    2,314
    i think it can go either way.. if the wolf populations get out of hand, obviously they'll munch up our game.. but if kept in proper balance, they'll help thin out the diseased animals. all these diseases deer and elk are getting in the last couple decades are due to that fact that nobody wants the sick ones. are you gonna take a buck with patches of hair missing/obvious signs of disease? nature keeps disease in balance with predators- and wolves are better than anything else at this.
     
  9. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    It's interesting which side your support based on depending on your situation. When I lived in Minnesota there was an effort to reintroduce Elk to MN. The farmers were up in arms about it because when deer moved thruogh a field they wouldn't do much damage, but and Elk herd would wipe out a third of the crop when the moved through a small corn or milo field. There was real problem with farmers illegally killing off the Elk to keep their crops from being damaged. The farmers actually supported reintroducing wolves specifically to control the Elk populations.
     
  10. mortre

    mortre Yelm, WA Active Member

    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    33
    Yes they are. Elk didn't have a problem surviving with wolves and native american's. Not until we over harvested them, and then killed off the wolves, letting the coyote's spread across the continent.

    I think the biggest thing that gets missed in the argument is that once the wolves are re-introduced, the coyote's that now are preying on the fawns and yearlings need to be exterminated. With out removing the coyote populations that moved in after we killed the wolves, the deer and elk will obviously suffer numbers wise. But the wolves should do a good bit of that work for us since they will kill coyotes on sight.
     
  11. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,838
    Likes Received:
    1,186
    See what you're not understanding is these wolves are not the return of the native Oregon wolves, these are a much larger and more ferocious beast (Canadian) that if left unchecked will throw the balance of Oregon wildlife way out of balance.

    The person that told me about this problem and really stressed just how bad it is now and how bad it will get was a guy from ODFW.
     
  12. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan Oregon City, Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,351
    Likes Received:
    336
    I have not had a chance to read any of the material that has been alludded to, but it seems to me that the problem with wolves, as compared to coyotes, is that wolves can take down full grown deer/elk (though it would probably take a pack) as well as the young, while coyotes can only take down the young. It isn't that I dislike wolves. It's that I have an extreme respect for the animal as a hunter. I don't think there is an animal on this planet who could rival it as a strategist. They will not take on an animal at full strength. They will run it nearly to death before attacking. I have read that a wolf can run at full speed for up to 14 miles, and once one is too tired to continue another from the pack will take it's place in the chase. They will take the weakest of the heard, but are also more than capable of taking a healthy animal, even a moose. Add to this the loss of local cattle and sheep, and I think it make the point that wolves are more of a danger to our game than coyotes.
     
  13. eriknemily

    eriknemily Tillamook County (Cheese!) Member

    Messages:
    779
    Likes Received:
    21
    I find this thread most intriguing. Both sides seem to have good point to support their hypothetical outcomes. Is there any other state that's in the same predicament with the reintroduction of wolves (whether they be native or not)?
     
  14. coyoteman5

    coyoteman5 North south east west Active Member

    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    97
    This last elk season I saw several sets of wolf tracks around sumpter and talk to a hunter who's brother in law if I remember right works for the state and said that the state hired a bounty hunter to hunt cougars in desolation last summer and he got 32 cats out of the unit. Odfw needs to get themselves together they are in my opinion is doing a bad management job, plan and simple. Not saying you need to wipe everything of the face of the earth but needs to be better balanced and with elk and deer herd numbers are going down and bad need to lower the predators need to be lower to start. Anyway my two cents.
     
  15. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,191
    Likes Received:
    4,377
    Wyoming, Montana, Idaho,...
    Take your pick.
     
  16. 2506

    2506 Seattle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,367
    Likes Received:
    729
    Up to this point all I hear is anecdotes and heresay. The link to the MSU study is worthwhile and more of what I gravitate towards in terms of decision-making.
    I think the environmentalist in me would like to think that putting wolves back into the ecosystem must be a good thing. The pragmatist in me thinks otherwise. A man smarter than I am once said:

    "Everyone's entitled to their opinon. They're even entitled to their opinion about progress. But you know what you're not entitled to? Your own facts. I'm sorry, but you're not."

    I'd like more science-based facts, please.
     
  17. mortre

    mortre Yelm, WA Active Member

    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    33
    The last study I looked at showed the populations of elk exploding in the areas surrounding the areas the wolves have expanded to. I.E. the "shrinking" elk herds are shrinking because most of the elk are moving to areas not currently occupied by wolves.

    My opinion is that we need to start putting hunting pressure on the wolves where they are thickest, to spread them out also. Relieve some of the pressure on the elk where the wolves are over-abundant. And put a bounty on the coyote's. Either way it's a complex problem.

    From everything I have read on the subject, the gray wolves are the native wolf for this region. Unless your talking about them being a slightly different strain/sub-species?
     
  18. Phillyfan

    Phillyfan Oregon City, Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,351
    Likes Received:
    336
    Ok, go find them. We are having a discussion and expressing opinions on the subject.
     
  19. ProLandSurveyor

    ProLandSurveyor Beaverton New Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    So my only personal experience didn't leave too good of a feeling with me. 4 of us hunted a pretty good section of the biterroot wilderness right on the border with Montana in oct of 08. We were there 10 days, saw elk 2 days and saw or heard wolves 8 days. After 4 days the snow set in and we began to see wolves tracks in our tracks after sometimes only 20 minutes. We found 3 fairly fresh cow carcasses and two of the days they would start howling at one end of a canyon and be howling and moving their way up the canyon. Seemed like they were hunting and or trying to push something. It didn't matter if one of us was in the canyon at the time or not, they seemed to stay just out of site. It left us with sort of an eariy feeling to say the least. The locals we talked to were seething to hunt them but that year, what would have been the first year of it, I think, the wolves hunt was put on hold in the court system.

    Being a lifer Oregonian, I really hope the ODF&W monitor the situation closely.
     
  20. 2506

    2506 Seattle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,367
    Likes Received:
    729
    That was a rhetorical statement, Einstein.