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Will powder residue on front of cylinder prevent cycling

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by pinne65, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. pinne65

    pinne65 Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Hello,

    I'm a pretty happy owner to a .454 Ruger Super Redhawk. It is actually my first revolver. After firing it for the first time I noticed a discoloring on the front of the cylinder. I tried wiping it of using a piece of cloth but it didn't help. I asked a friend at work who has a lot more experience with revolvers than me and he said there isn't much you can do about it and it's normal. So I didn't think more of it.

    However, during shooting sessions, sometimes while cocking the revolver, the cylinder wouldn't cycle. The behavour wasn't consistent. It just happened every once in a while.

    The last time it happened was at home while dry-firing. I couldn't think of anything else so I finally went at the residue with a brass brush and got almost all of it off. And it didn't happen any more. I haven't fired the gun since.

    Does it make sense that the gun powder residue on the cylinder front could prevent cycling?

    Thanks for any input!
     
  2. pinne65

    pinne65 Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Of course only my revolver has a cylinder ront instead of a front
     
  3. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    Be sure to clean the face of the barell area also. Is this a new gun or used and what ammo are you using?
     
  4. Simonpie

    Simonpie Portland Active Member

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    My girlfriend recently picked up a matching set of Ruger new Vaqueros. After about 20 rounds (each) at the range, one refused to cycle and the other felt "sticky". I was peeved, but in the end the fault was probably mine (or hers really). I normally keep my guns fairly oily, but these being stainless and new, I was pretty neglectful in that respect. The little tab that locks the cylinder when the gate is open (single action, by the way) wasn't dropping back into place when the gate closed. Your double action is different, but all revolvers are full of fiddly little bits. A general lube and clean may be all you need. And yes, the New Vaqueros turn black in front of the cylinders. They don't show any signs of rubbing. If yours is hanging up there, it should show circular scratches through the carbon. A horribly misaligned cylinder will deposit lead scrapings in the cylinder/barrel interface, but that should be visibly obvious if it is your problem.
     
  5. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    To answer your question. Yes, powder residue will cause the issue you are describing. However it would have tro be a good amount of powder to do that. The blacking in front of cylinders is common. I use a Lead Remover cloth to clean mine. It also work it around the forcing cone of the barrel It works wonderful.
    I however suspect you have a hand or pawl issue that is causing the lack of indexing.
    Some discoloration is normal in revolvers but that generally takes 1000'a of rounds.
     
  6. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

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    Deposits on the face of the cylinder and the face of the forcing cone has always been a revolver issue. More often found on new revolver with a tight barrel gap. Barrel gap can run as tight as .003 and if you have any cylinder runout it can cause your binding problem. After a few hundred rounds the barrel gap may grow .001 and well have less problem. Keeping the forcing cone and cylinder face clean is a must.
     
  7. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a Ruger person, so I don't know how tightly they are toloranced, but absolutely the barrel to cylinder gap will slowly clog.

    My old Colt (1926) even has a machined relief in the top strap just above the gap because that area will accumulate residue too, and can also jam the cylinder. The top strap above the gap needs to be cleaned regularly too.

    That old Colt has a .0025 cylinder gap and needs to be cleaned properly about every 50 rounds to keep it operating smoothly.
     
  8. pinne65

    pinne65 Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Thanks everybody for your input!

    The gun is four years old. I'm the first owner. I don't really remember, but I think these symptoms started showing after about a year. I have put about 3000 rounds through it. 600 of those were full power Cassull loads with about 25 grs of Unique 2400. The rest were various powered colt 45 loads using Unique Alliant and mostly lead bullets by Oregon Trail.

    I've cleaned and lubed using Hoppes #9 almost after every shooting session. Except then for the cylinder front. But there were never any scratches

    What's would "hand or pawl issue" refer to? Sorry, still after 4 years, I still have a lot to learn...

    I will post an update after the next shooting, hopefully in two weeks.
     
  9. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

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    45 colt case is shorter than the 454. Is the problem more evident with 45 colt, 454 or both. Using lead bullets, it is possible you have a little lead shaving when shooting the 45 Colt, partly filling the chamber so the 454 cases don't seat as deeply as they should. This would cause the 454 cases to drag in the back. Look carefully at the extractor, and the front of the chamber. Also look carefully at the top strap, just above the gap. you have powder, and/or lead shavings somewhere. Lead in the forcing cone? Do you use a Lewis Lead remover on your forcing cone?

    Hand and pawl are what advance the cylinder and lock it in place when the hammer is drawn back.
     
  10. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

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    +1


    This could also be your problem. Very common on revolvers that take a long and short case round. You get crude built up in the chamber, brush it well with #9.
     
  11. pinne65

    pinne65 Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    I've been pretty thorough about also cleaning the chambers using #9 and a bronze brush. But haven't paid any extra attention to the forcing cone other than treating it as a part of the barrell. Would I need something more than #9 for the cone?

    I can't see any lead shavings anywhere though. But I can imagine that some lead as well as powder residue could build up in the trigger housing and other hard to get to spaces. What would be the best way to clean that out - have a gun smith take it apart, flush it with break cleaner or?
     
  12. hermannr

    hermannr Okanogan Highlands Well-Known Member

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    I use the Lewis lead remover, you can get the kit from Brownells. It consists of a rod, a rubber plug (caliber specific) and some brass screens. Not expensive, be very effective.
     
  13. pinne65

    pinne65 Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    Ok,

    Finally got to go shooting again. Fired about 100 rounds without any problems. I'm pretty certain the "frontal residue" was the problem.