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Will Buffalo Bore 340 gr +P+ Hurt my New Ruger Redhawk 44?

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by 4Freedom, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. 4Freedom

    4Freedom Boise, Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I just purchased a brand new Ruger Redhawk 44Mag with a 4in barrel. I'm going on a trip to Glacier NP and decided to ditch my old S&W 629-4 4in, because I want the gun primarily to be used for bear defense and the 629 just cannot handle the heavy loads like the Ruger. After purchasing the Ruger and seeing its solid construction I really feel much happier with it than the Smith. Needless to say, even though I love the Smith, I cannot afford to keep it and will be getting rid of it..

    I also own a S&W 460v which supposedly can handle the heaviest of the heaviest, yet the Buffalo Bore ammo screws up the gun and I have extraction issues, as well as cylinder locking issues. I had to force open my cylinder once as it got stuck after the last round. Only through constant hammer cocking and pulling the trigger could I finally get it to budge. I'm told there are many reasons why the Buffalo Bore 460 doesn't work in a .460. Everything from being too hot, to have improper dimensions on the casings or bullets, etc. I don't know why, but Buffalo Bore is out for my 460.

    Now, I am told that the Ruger Redhawk can handle the heavy loads. So, I see Buffalo Bore makes a very nice 44 mag round that almost seems on par with a .454 Casull round. Since, I am going into Grizzly Bear country in Montana, I would like to have the best load I can handle. Also, I would like to do a little plinking and practicing with the round I load for my hikes. Basically, I would like to shoot a box or so. Would, using the Buffalo Bore 340gr +P+ hurt my Ruger Redhawk or can it take a good number of these rounds without any risk of abuse? I know my Smith could not even handle the 320gr hardcast COrbon loads. S&W told me themself on the phone not to shoot more than 3 or 4 rounds ever for the life of this gun for practice. I am told the Redhawk can take a steady supply of these without any issues. I guess, I know the Buffalo Bore is pushing the 44 mag to the limits and want to make sure there won't be any repercussions with this round. I do want to get a feel for it if I will be carrying it with me.

    I'd appreciate to hear people's opinions. Do most people think I should stay with the Corbon Hunter 320gr Hardcast round or would it be to my advantage to use the 340gr +P+ Buffalo Bores, considering the Ruger Redhawk, is supposedly built like a tank .

    My thoughts are accuracy won't be an issue, as if I am being charged by a Black Bear or Brown Bear I would only get one or two shots and would wait until it got close. For the most part I will rely on pepper spray for protection, but if I am in that unfortunate situation where all I can reach for is my gun, I'd like the best round I can get for that situation. I feel the more knockdown power the better.

    I'm assuming I can handle the recoil of this round, because the Redhawk is a thick frame and I can handle the recoil of the .460 rounds out of my 5in S&W 460v. I'm assuming it would be somewhat comparable to that, although my 460v does have a compensator.
     
  2. 2gr8dgs

    2gr8dgs oregon Active Member

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    Rest assured, your Redhawk will handle ANY commercial load on the market, & then some!
     
    mjbskwim and (deleted member) like this.
  3. tkdguy

    tkdguy Portland, Oregon Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    It is my understanding that BB either modifies the propellants and maintains the pressures that 44 Mag Tanks can handle. So you are safe. BB specifies that all the heavy frame .44's are acceptable for their loads, e.g. Super Blackhawks, Redhawks, and there may be a Taurus or so.

    Did you buy the Redhawk for the Glacier Trip or was there another reason?
     
  4. 4Freedom

    4Freedom Boise, Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Well, I have been wanting a Redhawk for a long time, because I want to shoot heavier loads. I know my S&W just wasn't made as durable as the Redhawk and that has always bothered me about it. IMO, what is the point of having a big bore gun if it is picky about ammo and has been known to have various issues with many hotter and heavier loads. With respect with this issue, I am finished with the Smith. When I am in the forest, I pack 320gr Corbons, but S&W told me I can never shoot these for plinking. I'd rather be able to practice with the loads I intend on using.

    However, I will be packing the Redhawk with me on my Glacier trip. I will feel more confident with this gun, especially loaded up with the BB.

    I'm glad to hear the Redhawk can handle most any type of load. One person on another forum told me only the Super Redhawk should use this load, but I think he is mistaken, as a majority of people have told me the Redhawk can handle it well.


    When I get back from my trip, I will put my pre-lock S&W 629up for sale... It's a lovely gun in many ways, but I cannot afford to keep both.
     
  5. Dave Workman

    Dave Workman Western Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Well, one advisory is in order.

    Your Ruger will handle hot loads, but — as I am certain others here will confirm — if you use hard cast bullets rather than jacketed bullets, at those velocities you will likely experience leading, in the chambers, around the forcing cone and certainly in the barrel.

    I've fired the Redhawk in .480 and it is an awesome handgun with hot factory loads. Recoil, as you have probably discerned, is pretty stout and it will only get stouter with hotter loads.

    Good luck on your Glacier trek. I really envy you. Work and some health issues have sort of kept me off the trail this summer and it's drivin' me crazy.
    :laugh:

    When you return, how about providing some pictures?
     
  6. 4Freedom

    4Freedom Boise, Idaho Well-Known Member

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    You mean Redhawk in .480? I have not heard of a .460 Redhawk, but if one exists please let me know, I want one :D..

    Well, I don't plan on shooting lots of hard card bullets, but I guess it is something to think about. The hardcasts have a good chunk of lead exposed. How hard would it be to clean it with regular solvent? My .460 cleaned out rather easy with the hardcast Buffalo Bore rounds.

    Sorry to hear your health has kept you from going. I pray you improve..

    I will certainly have lots of pics to show people when I get back.. Not just of Glacier, but a few other places like Sawtooths, Bitterroot and Wallowas. I will be glad to share..
     
  7. Dave Workman

    Dave Workman Western Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Right you are.
    A typo on my part. It's fixed now.

    Cleaning leading out from hard cast bullets depends upon the composition of the bullet and how hot the load is. I've shot hard cast .357s that were simply horrid and left an awful mess that took quite a bit of Hoppe's No. 9 and a good bristle brush, while I've also shot hard cast in .45 that left hardly any residue at all.
     
  8. Da Duke

    Da Duke Arkansas New Member

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    BFR's can handle them as well.