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Which powder dipper in a Lee 30-06 Pacesetter Set.. ?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Spec.-K, Jul 20, 2014.

  1. Spec.-K

    Spec.-K Longview, WA Active Member

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    So I had a die set given to me, and its missing the powder dipper that comes with it.
    I have a dipper set, so I was wondering which volume of dipper it originally came with.
    If anyone knows, please let me know.
    Thanks.
    -K
     
  2. rocky3

    rocky3 oregon coast Active Member

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    Hi, Here is what I would do: Check load you want in your guide, get out your balance scale and measure the weight called for in the guide. Next enter the powder into an empty cartridge to see where it comes. Next get a Lee measuring cup and empty the powder into the cup that holds that amount. from there you can measure the powder into the cartridges and once in a while weigh them. Not the most accurate but if you do not load to maximum you should be fine to go.
     
  3. Spec.-K

    Spec.-K Longview, WA Active Member

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    Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm thinking of putting them up for trade and want to complete the set.
    So I'm looking to know which dipper came with it.
     
  4. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: Jul 20, 2014
  5. SinisterSouthpaw

    SinisterSouthpaw SW WA Active Member

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    I'm not sure that buying or otherwise getting another one would get you a penny more for the die set. It would not surprise me to learn that 99.999% of people who buy the Lee sets throw the dippers away or lose them or put them under the bench and forget about them............
     
  6. Spec.-K

    Spec.-K Longview, WA Active Member

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    Ok, thanks guys.
    I'll list them and see what happens.
    -K
     
  7. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    EEEE! while I'm ok with measuring powder volumetricly, I'm really leery of using the lee dippers... I would highly recommend using a scale, or a real powder dispenser, yes, I know it makes it bigger, but really not by that much and it will be much more consistent.
     
  8. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    not having a dipper isn't a big deal.. not having a scale is.. making a dipper is easy.. if you have a scale
     
  9. bellarum

    bellarum beaverton Well-Known Member

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    I only use the dippers to move powder to the scale. Anything clean and suitable will work to do the same as long as it is cleaned before changing to a different powder.
     
  10. gunfreak

    gunfreak Boise Well-Known Member

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    I have the full set of dippers and use them all the time with great accuracy, bought mine at Cabelas for $10.99 for the whole set. I use the 1.6 dipper for all my .223 rounds checking the weight occasionally. It's always really good. Not meant for and I don't use it for my 30-06 hunting ammo because I want it to be more precise.
     
  11. SinisterSouthpaw

    SinisterSouthpaw SW WA Active Member

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    Here is a use for the dippers, even if--or maybe especially if, you want to be precise.

    If you are someone who likes to keep track of lot to lot variations of density in your favorite powders or experiment a lot, the Lee dippers can be useful since they are metric. If you have a scale that weighs in grams and a calculator, it is very easy to divide the mass (weight) by the volume (dipper) and come up with a percentage.

    1 cc of water = 1 gram so...a dipperful of powder that averages 1.6 grams divided by the volume of the dipper used, in this case 2.2 cc, gives us a density of 73% (rounded up from 72.727272 etc%) of the same amount of water. I write this on the jug and when I buy a new jug I do the same calculation and compare. This used to be a valuable test since powder varied so much from lot to lot, especially those flakey Swedish powders...........today, the powder makers hold themselves to a tighter tolerance, but I still get surprised once in a while so I still do it for any rifle powder I expect to use in my bench rifles. I have had to re-think a load after buying a jug that was a lot different in density, and reconsider using a powder that was very inconsistent in more than two lots. For plinking or handgun use I don't bother.

    BTW, Richard Lee explains a very good method to use when dipping powder. Using it will give you more uniform, er, dips.:)