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Where's the money WWP?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by timac, Jan 2, 2015.

  1. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    After their anti gun stance, now this. It looks as if WWP is helping themselves and not our brothers.


    Wounded Warriors Project called legal scam as scandalous news spreads

    January 1, 2014




    Wounded Warriors Project earned our ire about a year ago when they made it clear they didn’t want to partner with gun owners to help them fundraiser. Or Christians (read on).

    More recently, they sued a tiny, all-volunteer “Help Indiana Veterans” group for calling them out on the tens of millions WWP spends on salaries and the paltry three or four pennies on the dollar they apparently spend on actual grants.

    Word of Wounded Warriors Project and its shameful scam-like handling of monies is spreading, thanks in part to a report at the huge “Veterans Today” blogsite.

    VT.jpg
    Wounded Warriors Project A Legal Scam

    by Alex Graham
    (Veterans Today) – As we are coming to find out, wounded Vets are big money. Considering I’m 146% disabled, I’m trying to figure out how to tap into this. The only thing I can see is to start my own 501(c)(3) and start cooking the books with a big $300 K a year salary for my work. Member and eagle-eyed scrutineer Bruce spotted this heartbreaking article. Just when we thought it was safe to come out of the woods after the last news of the Big Six VSOs padding their bank accounts on the backs of all our disabled, along comes this article and investigation revealing nothing is sacred among thieves.

    If you were thinking about donating to the Wounded Warrior Project, think twice. It would behoove you to get in your car and drive cross-country to deliver the funds to the charity you hope to help. More money would end up in their hands than entrusting it to the WWP for disbursement. The Beatles song Tax Man comes to mind- Here’s one for you, nineteen for me. Here’s what I received. It’s ugly.

    I’m really sad to read this about the Wounded Warrior Project. I have definitely been a supporter up to now. The attached 2011 990 tax return is a real eye opener! For one, that’s a lot of BIG salaries they are paying at the first and apparently the second (outsourced) level for executive compensation! Obviously it’s not only corporations that can get greedy.



    Initially they refused to even appear on Tom Gresham’s GunTalk radio show.

    Then, after a backlash of angry gun owner backlash via social media and the web, Wounded Warriors reversed course and said they would appear.

    The appearance on the radio show was a complete and utter train wreck and was ended earlier than planned after their well-paid executive director Steve “Money Money Money” Nardizzi said gun owner partnership was unwelcome. Here’s our report immediately after the radio interview, which was heard by tens, if not hundreds of thousands of gun owners.

    Nardizzi, for being so well-paid, utterly fumbled.

    He tried to spin his way out of the mess but only managed to spin himself in deeper, offering all sorts of weak excuses why WWP couldn’t partner with gun-related sponsors. He cited sponsorships with cyclists and how WWP had cut back on those sponsorships because of some sort of inferior return on investment.

    Gresham pressed Nardizzi, saying that WWP had even changed language on their website from firearms to the more incendiary word “weapon”.

    Nardizzi offered every excuse imaginable, but in the end Gresham pinned him down as saying that while gun owners are absolutely welcome to send money to WWP, they could not use the logo.

    Gresham said that sounds an awful lot like WWP not wanting to associate with gun owners. “We’ll take your money, but we don’t want to be seen with you,” Gresham said, paraphrasing him.

    Nardizzi tried to deny this, but it was a lost cause to anyone with half a lick of common sense and intelligence.

    “We’ll take your money and you can do fundraisers for us, but we won’t let you use our logo!” Tom says, mocking Nardizzi’s attempts to spin the truth.

    Looking back, I think it was truly God’s work that led us to this discovery, as according to their IRS filings, in 2011 it would seem as though they only gave a little over $5 million in grants on nearly $150 million in income.

    Speaking of God, it’s not just gun people that Wounded Warriors Project doesn’t want to be seen with – it’s Christians too. That’s right. They don’t want affiliations with Christian-based groups either.

    Fundraiser at the Playboy Mansion? No problem (twice, in fact).

    Fundraiser at a church? Can’t have that.

    It’s up to you to whom you give your hard-earned charitable contributions.

    Is Wounded Warrior Project worthy? That’s up to you.

    WWPscoundrels.jpg



    This entry was posted on January 1, 2014 at 12:40 pm and is filed under Blog. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
     
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  2. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    I just dont trust charities.. No matter how terrific the idea behind them is.. They all are open to curruption.

    This doesnt surprise me.. Those MFing admins should have the bubblegum kicked out of them for stealing from actual wounded worriors in their time of need.
     
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  3. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    I would guess it is like all charities, it's all in the paperwork and how they cook the books..... just sayin...
    Who do ya trust with your charitable donations?
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2015
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  4. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    Sadly, no one.. Human nature proves that everyone is corruptible at some point.
     
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  5. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    I've volunteered time to Habitat of Humanity, on my veteran brothers homes. I can see my work and efforts are used responsibly. I too am leery of most charities.
     
  6. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    We have a no nonsense way of donating to charities & it does not involve any electric transfers to some org in a big city.
    We help out in various ways in our little community by giving things that they need that we have & we don't use along with our wisdom to people that are less fortunate than us. I have cut many cords of firewood for people that I knew (who didn't know me) who needed it, no sweat (literally, I had 2 strong kids to help) and that, in turn, showed them the value of charitable giving to others. It's the snowball effect that really works locally.
    My wife helps those who do not know enough to get themselves out of a financial rut that could ruin them.
    That to me is charitable giving!!!
    We are not on the jet set scene trying to impress anyone, including the neighbors. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2015
  7. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    This is the exact way I prefer to give back also, direct involvement.
     
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  8. deadeye

    deadeye Albany,OR. Moderator Staff Member

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    Anything recent on this, this was from over a year ago. No surprise to me as all charities that show as many commercials as they do throws red flags at the start.
     
  9. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    Our family supports local charities where "staff" is volunteers with maybe an accountant being paid.

    Start local, effect national.

    It doesn't work the other way around.
     
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  10. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    Any time you get the puppy dog eyes, pleadings and tears (think Tammy Fae) on national TV over and over again, it has got to send up some red flags......:s0159:
     
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  11. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Question "What do you get when you remove Tammy Fae's makeup?"

    Answer "Jimmy Hoffa"
     
  12. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    We give food to Oregon Food Bank, and toys and books to the sunshine division. It's basic needs and no loose gobs of cash floating about.
     
  13. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe in any charity anymore, no different than most churches it's just a scam to get money and become rich by doing nothing and claiming your helping someone.

    I'd rather go give me money to a Vet personally.
     
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  14. forefathersrback

    forefathersrback Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I've said it before, and I'll say it again. The world is going to hell, and the devil is a queer. But in this case I will change it..The world is going to hell....and WWP is the queer. Double bubblegum them.
     
  15. timac

    timac Loading Magazines! Well-Known Member

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    1413573903878.cached.jpg
    WAR AT HOME
    09.26.14
    Wounded Warrior Project Under Fire
    Is a much-touted charity for American veterans everything it says it is?
    Over the past decade, the Wounded Warrior Project has emerged to become one of the celebrated charities in the country—but with its prominence comes deeper scrutiny and criticism.

    It’s a broad but closely held sentiment within the veterans’ advocacy community: grumbling and critiques about the fundraising behemoth WWP has become, and whether it has been as effective as it could be.

    In interviews, critical veterans’ advocates and veterans charged that the Wounded Warrior Project cares more about its image than it does about helping veterans; that it makes public splashes by taking vets on dramatic skydiving trips but doesn’t do enough to help the long-term wellbeing of those injured in combat.

    These criticisms come from a broad cross-section of veterans and their advocates, the vast majority of whom refused to speak on the record due to the sway the Wounded Warrior Project carries.

    “They are such a big name within the veterans’ community. I don’t need to start a war in my backyard,” a double-amputee veteran who served in Iraq told The Daily Beast.

    But granted anonymity, the vet gave voice to what is at the very least a perception problem for the WWP: “They’re more worried about putting their label on everything than getting down to brass tacks. It’s really frustrating.”

    The same veteran spoke of waking up in the hospital after an IED hit his supply truck—WWP, he said, had given him only trivial merchandise: a backpack, a shaving kit and socks.

    “Everything they do is a dog-and-pony show, and I haven’t talked to one of my fellow veterans that were injured… actually getting any help from the Wounded Warrior Project. I’m not just talking about financial assistance; I'm talking about help, period,” he said.

    Some gripe in interviews with the Beast about how the charity has become more of a self-perpetuating fundraising machine than a service organization. WWP certainly is successful at fundraising: It had revenues of more than $300 million, according to its most recent audited report, up from approximately $200 million the year before.

    “In the beginning, with Wounded Warrior, it started as a small organization and evolved into a beast,” said Sam, an active-duty Army soldier who works with Special Forces. It's “become so large and such a massive money-maker,” he says, that he worries the organization cares about nothing more than raising money and “keeping up an appearance” for the public with superficial displays like wounded warrior parking spots at the Walmart.

    Sam said he’s not interested in becoming involved with the Wounded Warrior Project after he leaves active-duty service—he prefers small nonprofits that are “just trying to survive” with a smaller budget and narrower mission.

    “They’re laser-focused on making money to help vets, but forgetting to help vets,” said one veterans’ advocate. “It’s becoming one of the best known charities in America—and they’re not spending their money very well.”

    The organization also engages in branded partnerships for everything from ketchup to paper towels to playing cards—something that rubs other veterans’ groups the wrong way.

    “It’s more about the Wounded Warrior Project and less about the wounded warrior,” said a second veterans’ advocate.

    “You have an organization that is spending God knows how many millions of dollars saying that they’re helping people, but they’re not,” said Davis, an Iraq War veteran.
    Here are the charity’s self-reported results: As of September, the Wounded Warrior Project said it was serving more than 56,000 wounded vets and nearly 8,000 family members.

    To date, the WWP's benefits team has helped 6,600 veterans submit benefit claims, and their Warriors to Work program helped place 1,900 veterans in jobs. The organization offers peer mentoring, employment assistance services, physical health and wellness activities, and long-term support initiatives.

    But of the more than 56,000 veterans the group counts as “alumni,” meaning that they have been registered with the organization, many don’t directly engage with WWP.

    Less than two-thirds (62 percent) of alumni participated in at least one WWP activity or service in the past year, according to a survey of alumni the group shared with the Beast. But according to their internal database, 78.9 percent of alumni have been involved with “engagements and interactions” with WWP this year.

    The Wounded Warrior Project has also gotten mixed results from charity watchdogs: Charity Watch gave Wounded Warrior a C+ in 2013, up from a D two years prior. Charity Navigator gave it three out of four stars.

    WWP claims to currently spend 80 percent of its budget on programs for veterans. But their formulation includes some solicitations with educational material on it as money spent on programs.

    A 2013 collaboration between the Tampa Bay Times and the Center for Investigative Reporting reported that the charity spent just 58 percent of donations directly on veterans’ programs. That year, the figure WWP self-reported was 73 percent.

    In contrast, a veterans’ charity like Fisher House, which received four stars from Charity Navigator and an A+ from Charity Watch, spent close to 95 percent of its budget on its programs.

    There is also a distinct bitterness, especially from smaller advocacy groups, about the level of executive compensation doled out to the group’s leadership: For example, CEO Steven Nardizzi makes an annual salary of $375,000, according to their most recent tax report.

    WWP counters that its volunteer Board of Director studies similar organization to determine executive compensation, and that their CEO’s compensation is approximately one-tenth of 1 percent of its budget. Nardizzi himself has dismissed charity ratings as unhelpful in the past.

    Ken Davis, a veteran who served in Iraq before being injured, is considered among the “alumni” of the Wounded Warrior Project—even though he said he no longer wants to be associated with it.

    “I receive more marketing stuff from them, [and see more of that] than the money they’ve put into the community here in Arizona,” he told the Beast. “It’s just about numbers and money to them. Never once did I get the feeling that it’s about veterans.”

    He could have used a ride to a VA facility for health care, he said. But rather than receive practical assistance from the WWP, he got a branded fleece beanie.

    “They’re marketing, they’re spending money—but on what?” Davis asked.

    Outside defenders of the Wounded Warrior Project, in interviews with the Beast, suggested that critics were merely jealous of the charity’s success, and that the disapproving criticisms were merely a function of fear that WWP was eating up their donor dollars.

    “There’s a certain level of jealousy, that [WWP] have such cachet, and on a daily basis people will associate [other prominent veterans’ groups] as Wounded Warrior. That rubs people the wrong way,” said one such defender in the nonprofit sphere.

    As for the administrative costs of the charity, the nonprofit worker continued, “There is a fundamental misunderstanding in the public sphere about what it really costs to run an effective nonprofit.”

    For its part, the Wounded Warrior Project dismisses much of the criticism.

    The branding of products will “help to create awareness of the challenges and needs of this generation of veteran... help fund the 20 free programs and services we provide to injured veterans, their families and caregivers, and inform veterans of the programs and services we provide so that they can register as Alumni to take part in them,” their spokeswoman said.

    As for the comfort packages and merchandise, Roberts notes that it reflects the group’s origins: WWP started with just six friends packing backpacks to provide items to wounded services warriors at Walter Reed Medical Center. And the group also says employees are empowered to provide direct assistance to veterans such as rent, utilities, food, and emergency repairs.

    The Wounded Warrior Project is certainly not a scam, nor an ill-meaning charity. Even its fiercest detractors admit that WWP has the right motives, even if they believe WWP can be a lot more effective.

    But as the Wounded Warrior Project has grown to become one of the nation’s most prominent veterans’ groups, it still has room for improvement.

    Can it claim to serve 56,000 vets when at least one-third haven’t engaged with the group in the past year? Or claim to be maximally effective if it spends more of its budget on administrative costs than the top-ranked charities in the field do?

    At the very least, the Wounded Warrior Project has a perception problem among a broad group of fellow veterans advocates and vets themselves.

    “You have an organization that is spending God knows how many millions of dollars saying that they’re helping people, but they’re not,” said Davis, an Iraq veteran.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2015
  16. NoFlinch

    NoFlinch In a van down by the river Owner of Cocaine addicted dog.

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    I figgered' this out about WWP about 4 years ago......

    This "thing" about "charities"........

    Some may remember my (and Joe Link's) inquiries into charities to give to this year here on NWFA.

    I did NOT give to anyone or any organization this year, when usually I give generously every year.

    I've decided to seek out the local lady trying to rescue horses, but can't buy hay, or the local Pot Bellied Pig Rescue Foundation.......

    In other words, "If you have a Marketing/Public Relations dept., and your Executive Director draws a nice salary, I am not interested".:D

    I have a 501C3 non-profit, but my salary/benefits, etc. is ZERO.
     
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  17. deen_ad

    deen_ad Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    <- Why there aren't any school shootings in Israel!
    Teacher with long gun slung over her shoulder!!!

    Yep, even the Red Cross was caught not long ago "cooking the books".

    Deen
    NRA Life Member, Benefactor Level
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    Vancouver Rifle & Pistol Club member

    "A gun is like a parachute. If you need one and don't have it, you'll probably never need one again!"
     
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  18. IronMonster

    IronMonster Washington Opinionated Member Diamond Supporter

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    Are you really a 501C ? What kind of organization are you?
     
  19. NoFlinch

    NoFlinch In a van down by the river Owner of Cocaine addicted dog.

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    Charitable :D:D
     
  20. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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