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Where can I locally buy CCI #41 primers, 55 gr. FMJ M193 bullets and H335 powder?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by zippygaloo, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. zippygaloo

    zippygaloo Oregon Member

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    Anyone know where I can locally purchase CCI #41 military small rifle primers (for 5.56mm), bulk 55gr FMJ .224 bullets (M193) and 8 lbs. Hodgdon H335?
     
  2. x1hunter89

    x1hunter89 gresham oregon Active Member

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    call ur local recruiter lol
     
  3. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Go to your keyboard. Can't get more local than that. Then go to Powder Valley, Inc..

    You can get Wolf .223 primers which are equal to the .41's for only $15.50/thousand rather than the "near $40" you'll have to pay for the CCI's.
    They also have H335 @#17.90/lb or $128.70/8# jug.

    Winchester bulk 55 gr FMJ-BT Bullets are $100.thousand there too.

    One phone call or online transaction will get it all delivered to your door. If you use the Wolf Primers they'll perform every bit as good as the CCI's without slamfires and you'll pay for the hazmat fee and a good part of the shipping charge with the savings on primers alone. Add the savings on powder as well, not to mention gasoline and time, this is certainly a good option.

    If you insist on the CCI #41's they're only $32 at Powder Valley. Still in all, if you buy a few boxes of primers and a jug of powder the hazmat fee is still reasonable compared to local prices.
     
  4. BANE

    BANE Battle Ground WA. Well-Known Member

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    Look on outdoorstrader there's a guy selling hornaday 55.grain bullets there all the time
    I think he is asking 79 dollars for 1000ct. He's in vancouver nice guy to.
    I use the wolf primers also they're really good for the money and I've never had a misfire.
     
  5. WR Cartridge Company

    WR Cartridge Company washougal New Member

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    Not to put you off on wolf primers, because I have used them a lot in the past..like nearly 200 thousand according to my log book, but I have found them to be temperature sensitive, meaning lots of no fires in temps below freezing, same can of ammo,same rifle, warmer day = good.
    I load cci because of reliability...not worth the few dollars to ME.
     
  6. rrojohnso

    rrojohnso Vancouver, WA Member

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    Give Blackwater Ventures a call in Vancouver. I know they have the primers, believe they have the powder, and may have the bullets - they're just off 4th plain and SR 500 (Just E. of 205).
    [Not affiliated with 'em, just shop there from time to time - they have the cci 7.62 primers as well]
     
  7. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    And yet I had absolutely NO misfires during my 18 degree shooting sessions last month with the Wolf's. I'd be amazed if a Russian primer truly had any problems with cold considering the winters THEY have.
     
  8. WR Cartridge Company

    WR Cartridge Company washougal New Member

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    Sweet you got a quality batch! I sell the stuff so if I have a bad experience I need to look to the most reliable component due to possible warranty concerns. Do you know where wolf makes the primers they sell to the general public/ export market? Might be in a different plant or country than the loaded ammo they sell. probably like you I have shot literally tens of thousands of 7.62x39 with no problems...wet,dry,hot,cold...never a problem in my memory. Like I said I loaded nearly 200K of them in 5.56 but after that I'm done with them, no haters here just giving my experience.
     
  9. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Or you got a bad one. Wolf/Tula Primers are the same regardless if they end up in 7.62x39 Wolf Ammo or in a box destined for a reloader's bench.

    The Wolf/Tula primers are becoming quite popular among the competitors. Some are claiming single digit ES with these primers and several records have been set worldwide using these Russian primers.

    Who knows, maybe they just don't like "reamed primer pockets";);)
     
  10. WR Cartridge Company

    WR Cartridge Company washougal New Member

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    You are probably right by saying who knows...well anytime you need 5.56 that is processed and NOT auto-reamed shoot me a pm and if I have extra in the barrel I will pull out an order for you. I also have extra pull down 844 that I would pass along from time to time.

    John
     
  11. datguy

    datguy Vancouver, WA Member

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    What do you guys mean by "auto-reamed"? Am I making a mistake reaming primer pockets when I am prepping my brass to load?

    __new to reloading__
     
  12. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple views on which method to use. Here are mine.

    Reaming is chosen by most as it only requires a simple and inexpensive tool. All they do is ream the crimp at the mouth of the primer pocket (once the old primer is removed) leaving a chamfer on the edge of the pocket so the new primer will slip in. Yes, the method is inexpensive but it removes metal. It also doesn't do anything to restore the primer pocket dimensions which may have been distorted by the crimp process. The walls of the pocket may be somewhat hour-glassed shaped after crimping and most reamers don't correct this. The problem as I see it with "Auto Reamers" is that they can overdo the process. If not set up correctly, or monitored regularly, they can actually "counter bore" the primer pocket. This leaves a portion of the primer unsupported and reduces the "grip" on the primer which could lead to blown out primers which can then jamb an auto-loader.

    If one swages the primer pocket they're pressing a tool into the pocket that pushes the metal displaced by the crimping process back where it started or at least just out of the way. The nose of the tool also re-forms the primer pocket to more of a perfect cylinder shape. A swaging tool puts a radius on the mouth of the primer pocket so new primers are easily inserted. A swaged primer pocket provides the same metal contact area as a new case therefore none of the primer is unsupported reducing the blow out problem earlier described. A swaged primer pocket is more likely to be centered on the axis of the case as it doesn't remove metal, it just follows the original primer pocket dimensions.

    Tools for swaging can run from the "mid $30" range to $100 or so for a Dillon Super Swage. A swaging station is included in a Dillon 1050 progressive press but the press has an entry level price of around $1500 so only the real high volume shooters, as a rule, go this route.

    I have a Dillon Super Swage that I bough for less than $100. I have it mounted on a board that sits in my lap and I swage while watching TV. Have swaged tens of thousands of pieces of brass like this over the years and the brass I process like this is good for many reloads. I've picked up some brass that's been "Auto Reamed" that I've had to toss out after the first reload due to the "machine" overdoing the process and the primer pockets being loose as a goose.

    If one "reams" and does it right there's probably no problem with the process. If they swage, it's a better finished product (no metal removed) and it's harder to screw up the process.

    The choice is yours.
     
    mookmanjdj and (deleted member) like this.
  13. datguy

    datguy Vancouver, WA Member

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    Thank you for the explanation. I have a lot of XM193 5.56 that I shoot. I have been saving my brass with the intention to reload down the line. I just ordered the conversion and stuff for my Dillon 550 to load the 5.56. Will I need to swage this brass? If so, I'll order Dillon's unit.
     
  14. WR Cartridge Company

    WR Cartridge Company washougal New Member

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    If you have the time swage before you run the brass on the dillon, it will save a lot of cussing
     
  15. datguy

    datguy Vancouver, WA Member

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    WR, you are saying to run the 5.56 brass through the super swage, correct?
     
  16. WR Cartridge Company

    WR Cartridge Company washougal New Member

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    Yes be all means swage first...the dillon is a very very good press. But anytime a process that can be done otherwise I advise to do....I had two dillon's one for processing one for loading....one= deprime, and swage, size and trim....then to clean up...two= prime, and load.
     
  17. datguy

    datguy Vancouver, WA Member

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    Thank you! Seeing the full cycle of building a round for a given gun is really blowing my mind a little bit. I am at the very beginning of all of this. It is such an exciting sport/hobby. I appreciate the guidance. I will be ordering the super swage asap.
     
  18. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    That's why reloading/handloading is such a fun hobby. All the little intricacies of the process are challenging and once mastered give you a great feeling of accomplishment. But then that load you developed in the middle of winter suddenly doesn't shoot for crap on a hot summer day. You then get to start the process over. That too is fun in it's own way.

    Just a hint, keep good records. If you have a chronograph, keep good records of your round's performance, being sure to record temperature and humidity. Eventually you will have a book that will give you a great indication on what load you should use for the conditions.

    On the Super Swage, check out some of the You Tube videos on how to "Hot Rod" the tool. The addition of some wire/rubber bands will allow you to make it a much faster operation. Some have devised a rig that lowers the case into position and raises it when swaged. Takes one or two movements of your hand out of the operation.
     
  19. datguy

    datguy Vancouver, WA Member

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    deadshot2, I picked up a chronograph and a log book the same day. Headed to the range to try out my first hand loads tomorrow. Thank you for the advice!
     
  20. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Don't know what kind of chronograph you got but you can download a PDF of a neat test record here:

    Shooting Chrony Test Record

    To reinforce a previous suggestion, make sure to record the temperature when you run your tests. I do this and then have data sets for each temperature range I shoot in. Saves ammo to get "on target" when shooting on a day that's 30 degrees warmer than the previous day. Altitude also makes a difference if you make big geographic changes in your shooting locations (from the "flat lands" to "up in the Mountains")