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Where can I get trigger pull measured

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by GS Pilot, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. GS Pilot

    GS Pilot Vancouver, WA United States Member

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    Anyone know a gunsmith in the Portland Vancouver area who has ability to measure pistol trigger pull weight in a manner certified by NRA?
    Thanks
     
  2. Straight Shooter

    Straight Shooter North Bend OR Active Member

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    NRA certified trigger weights are done with actual weights. No spring or electronic scales accepted. You can make up a tester with a coat hanger and precision weighed fishing weights or water in a bottle and then weigh the bottle of water when it trips off. Most any gunsmith should have the actual weight system.
     
  3. GS Pilot

    GS Pilot Vancouver, WA United States Member

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    T

    This is what Sig Service told me over the phone. I'm not happy with the trigger on my new pistol and my informal measurements with a digital meter (certified for aircraft use) says it's at 13.5 lbs...supposed to be 10. I'd like to get it checked with an NRA scale as they recommend before sending it back for warranty work. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. Straight Shooter

    Straight Shooter North Bend OR Active Member

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    It's not uncommon for semi auto pistols to vary considerably in pull weight. The advertised weights are an average. Things like lubrication, the surface finish and angle of the sear all affect the pull. The return spring is actually about the smallest variable in trigger pull. I would put a thin oil on the sear and go dry fire it for an hour a day for a week. A good hard plastic snap cap will be a good idea but you can use spent primers for about 10 hits before changing to a fresh one. If you have the time and money the fun way would be to shoot it with live ammo 500 to 1000 shots and that will really slick up the whole gun. If using live ammo I would clean and relubricate every 500 rounds. Then clean it up and reweigh. In the shop we can speed the process with really fine stones and jigs to maintain or slightly adjust the sear angle. I wouldn't attempt to polish it at home.

    Sig has an excellent custom shop and no one knows their guns like they do. The difference between 13 and 10 is hard to feel. Rather than asking for a warranty adjustment of a couple pounds, I would request the custom shop for something you really want. I would think they could get about 7-8 pounds on double action and down to 2 or 3 pounds on the single action pull. Maybe less if you want it.

    This is speculation on my part from here on. Factories sometimes have a range of replacement parts to help them achieve these results where I am stuck modifying what they came with. These parts are usually restricted so don't expect anyone outside of their shop to have access to any of them.
     
    DLeeHarley and GS Pilot like this.
  5. jg-rider

    jg-rider Hillsboro OR Member

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    I remember using sticks of butter. They weigh 1# or did. I made a tray and a hook to attach to the trigger, weighed it on a kitchen scale. Hung the gun muzzle up, added sticks of butter to the tray till the trigger broke. Then I cut some sticks in half and quarters weighed them on the kitchen scale and added or subtracted them to the tray to get the exact pull weight.
    Worked great until my wife found out what I was doing with her stuff.
    It worked great when checking double action 8 # revolver pulls.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  6. DLeeHarley

    DLeeHarley Idaho New Member

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    On my new Ruger SR1911 I was getting about 6.3 lbs brand new but it was not consistent. I completely striped it down and polished just about everything except the Sear or Hammer. The bow of the trigger, the grooves in the frame where the trigger bow slides, and everywhere metal meets metal. Then a bit of dry firing before going back to my gunsmith. It now breaks consistently at 4.11 lbs. My gunsmith was impressed. I like it better now that I know what I can expect from it. Later all,

    Dennis in Idaho