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Wheat grinders?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by The Cheese, May 11, 2011.

  1. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    So my hand me down wheat grinder from the 50's is feeling its age and I feel I need to get a new one at some point. I am looking to get 2: a manual one and an electric one. For the manual one it was decided long ago to get a country living mill. I know you can convert them to electric and all that, but for simplicity's sake I want a separate electric grinder. Does anyone have feed back good or bad on electric grinders? Only thing is that it can't be ginormous and i don't want one that makes a mess. Also if it can make me 8 cups or so of flour easily at a go that would be nice as well.
     
  2. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    manual = country living grain mill. no others even come close. The $400 price tag is the only thing holding me back right now

    Electrics are a different story.
     
  3. simpleguy

    simpleguy Clackamas Active Member

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    In our family an old industrial Hobart Coffee Grinder acts as the wheat grinder. That might be a good solution.
     
  4. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    After looking around, it seems the nutrimill is the king of electrics on the lesser expensive side. And the Hawos/KoMo seem to be a bit nicer, but 2x the price

    does it really do a good enough job to get flour fine enough for bread? Just kind of curious.
     
  5. Guilty

    Guilty Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    I own a L'EQUIP Nutrimill electric grain mill and GrainMaker manual grain mill. The GrainMaker will last multiple lifetimes, it is built extremely well and works great. As long as I have access to electricity, the Nutrimill is easily my preferred method for making flour from whole grain wheat berries. In 5 minutes, the Nutrimill makes enough bread flour to last me for a month or two and I just store the flour in tupperwear containers. I especially like that you can turn it off with wheat berries in the hopper, empty the flour and turn it back on and continue the process. IMO, the Nutrimill is very good quality, not too loud and it cleans up easy.
     
  6. darkminstrel

    darkminstrel PDX Well-Known Member

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    I've got a couple big rocks and a handle...

    But seriously; I've read that the Country Living mill is the *ONLY* one to even consider.
     
  7. simpleguy

    simpleguy Clackamas Active Member

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    So sorry I didn't see this earlier. It isn't the smoothest flour, but after a but of sifting, it works out pretty good.
     
  8. willseeker

    willseeker N. Portland. Well-Known Member

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    I'm smelling a group buy?

    I want to get a country living mill. Researched them for a couple of years and it seems like the ticket.

    If anyone knows a way to get a better buy, let us know.

    Be well all,
    Will
     
  9. MissJ

    MissJ Clackamas County Active Member

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    No help on a better price. I just bought mine from ready made resources $395 shipped to my door. Used it this weekend and made my first ever loaf of bread TOTALLY from scratch....I must say it was pretty good too....especially for a NooB

    It might ease your conscience when buying it that it is 100% made in the USA, washington state to be exact. it is a small business with the kinds of preparedness and sustainability ideals that many of us spout on this forum....so it's like a non-charitable donation that could save your life....errrr....kinda

    You really need to consider it a $600 purchase though, because if the country living grain mill is your only plan for grinding wheat post SHTF and you have much of your food storage in wheat to the tune of 30% or more (like most plans recommend) then you REALLY need to thave a backup. You can buy the "just in case" kit which is basically tailor made for the paranoid survivalist. It gives you a spare of every essential part, plus 2 spares of the most commonly lost piece. It gives you the "power bar" for increased efficiency as well as the corn/bean auger for if you want to grind anything bigger than wheat....which you PROBABLY will.

    I am stopping by the factory in 2 weeks to pick up the just in case kit (and save myself the hefty shipping charge)

    Another thing to consider....every family should have at least 2 post SHTF "trades" by which to barter/make money. Your grain mill could serve as a trade of sorts.....you could grind grain for neighbors etc. it is a task that a 9 or 10 year old child could easily be trusted with. You could also "motorize" it by running a pulley system and having a horse or ox pull a shaft driven pulley system (there is a video of this exact thing on their website).

    I am a fan of the child labor though....hahaha.....teach them a work ethic early on....and it's safe enough; they won't lose life limb or sight...
     
  10. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    I can tell you that the margins on the grain mills are pretty small. So even if you were able to get enough people to make the minimum order you aren't going to save all that much. I looked into becoming a dealer awhile ago and it was a bit prohibitive. About the only thing that you'd really save is on shipping by grouping a bunch together, maybe. If I had some expendable funds to get one right now I might consider heading up a GB on it. But I have a bunch of tools that need to be bought and my grinder works pretty good for now.
     
  11. clarthom

    clarthom oregon Member

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    I may have missed it hear but is there a reasonably priced alternative to the $400 dollar country living manual grain mill? My wife and I would like to mill our own grain but, being young and poor, we can not justify a $400 mill.
     
  12. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    check youtube. There are some pretty good video reviews of the various grinders. there is one other hand crank mill, but its kind of finicky. Also, if you are looking for a more daily use kind of thing, go electric. way easier, louder, but easier. The hand crank ones are more for when the SHTF. Even then, I doubt I will be making much bread. At that point it will be all about the rice.
     
  13. clarthom

    clarthom oregon Member

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    thanks, i'll search youtube, we were looking at hand crank mills because we are trying to take steps towards getting off the grid and part of that (as I'm sure you know) is using little electricity. the less you use, the less you have to produce. thanks again
     
  14. clarthom

    clarthom oregon Member

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    I found out that kitchenaid makes a grain mill attachment for their mixer, has anyone used it or experience the quality of this part?
     
  15. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Take a hard look at your mixer. If it's a newer one with a plastic cover over plastic gears, forget it. That grinder puts a LOT of stress on the mixer. Eventually you'll break or melt something. Also, you have to run the wheat through about 3 times on increasingly finer settings. It won't get it in one shot, not even with the older stronger mixer.

    If you have an older stout mixer, then the grinder is OK especially for the price. I've seen them on ebay for under $50 and new under $100. Of course they won't help you if power goes down...
     
  16. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Have you looked at actual antiques? Those things are heavy cast iron and built. As long as they aren't broken, the bushings are tight and all looks OK, they would do great. They are worth less than $100. In fact there are lots of great antiques out there like corn/walnut huskers, corn grinders, etc.
     
  17. clarthom

    clarthom oregon Member

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    thanks for the tip, i was going to ask about those, i have seen a few around antique stores and stuff for well under what a new one costs. i'll look into that over the kitchenaid attachment
     
  18. nubus

    nubus Guest

    Someone last year mentioned they had bought 4 Country Living mills and saved some amount money on them. Not sure how much, but I'm in on a group buy if it's just $25 less. This just might be the thread to get me off my arse and finally buy a mill!

    Link to old thread... Country Living Mill $375