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Wheat by the bushel

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by cyborg, Jul 16, 2011.

  1. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    I am trying to locate sources in Oregon for wheat by the bushel. I am trying to buy volume for a good price so some sort of agricultural grain supply place or such would be what I am looking for. Anyone know of such a place?
     
  2. Rascals

    Rascals Portland Or Active Member

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    Dont know any but if you find one I wouldnt mind getting a few of us together and getting a bigger order and splitting the cost.
     
  3. accurateone

    accurateone Eastern Washington Member

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    Just look in the phone book for "Grange or such & such co-op" you can purchase grain rather economically usually right after harvest when some of the farmers are selling off to pay operating loans. I told a fellow about this last year and he bought some bushels and had the co-op store them for so much cents per bushel a month. Until he decided to collect or sell Last year some folks bought for $4.odd dollars and sold around $8.00 Moral of the story, with the economy in poor shape, and commodities sought after, it's a good investment that you can eat... or possibly sell at a profit!
    Newby beware, grain prices cycle quickly some times... be prepared to eat it if need be. Note: Most grain delivered to "Bins" is treated with pesticide when it is received. Ask questions... can you say Malathion?
    A1`
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2011
  4. 19 Adam

    19 Adam rural Clackamas County, Oregon Active Member

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    Count me in. I will call around and see if I can find a source for "pre-treated" grain.
     
  5. shortstow80

    shortstow80 Wilsonville, Oregon Member

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    Bobs red mill sells some quality stuff. Not sure if its what you are looking for but it comes in 25 or 50 lb bags. They do have wholesale pricing with a $500 order and a separate price sheet for wholesale.
     
  6. salmonriverjohn

    salmonriverjohn N.W Oregon coast, Gods country Well-Known Member

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    What shortstow said, or perhaps Morrow county grain growers association may be a good starting point. A 2k lb. shipment of wheat split four ways?
     
  7. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I have a farm source for wheat. (private) A bushel weighs about 60# and is about 8 gallons. So, if I get 10 bushels I need about 20 five gal. buckets to not fill too high. (4 gallons per bucket.) I always take empty buckets on my trailer in case it rains. No mylar this trip. That happens back at home where I can winnow the wheat on a clean tarp using a large household fan. After winnowing, it goes into mylar with oxygen absorbers and gets sealed.

    Short version: I need about two 5 gallon buckets per bushel which is about 30# per bucket and 4 gallons per bucket.

    The only wheat I know of that's treated is seed wheat (to keep it from rotting in the ground before it sprouts) and all I've seen is green colored. I know of no wheat that's destined for human consumption that's chemically treated but what would I know for sure? I'd ask at the source.
     
  8. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    What Gunner is talking about is what I am looking for. Getting a very large amount of wheat from a source as close to the farmer as possible of course without pesticides or preservatives is the goal. I can imagine some of us getting together with a flat bed trailer or two with our barrels and buckets collecting the wheat and going to someones place who has the right facility and making a party of the winnowing and packaging.

    With the August harvest coming now is the time to locate a source and get our containers and plans together.
     
  9. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I would try to buy winter wheat which is probably still available. Spring wheat is much softer (they make cake flour out of it where hard bread flour is made from winter wheat.) Be sure it's well dried too. An experienced farmer can press his fingernail into a kernel and tell you what the moisture content is.

    Winter wheat is planted in the fall and harvested in the spring. Spring wheat is planted in the spring and harvested in summer. It's not only when it's planted; they are two (or more) different varieties.
     
  10. kenno

    kenno eastern WA Active Member

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    Call a feed store you are looking for whole wheat, not rolled, crimped or steamed. be prepared to pay .50 a pound but it is cleaned and bagged 50 pound bags.
     
  11. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    That will work, but you don't know what kind of wheat you are getting. Also, that's $30 a bushel. :( Right now farmers are getting about $8.50 a bushel, delivered. That a great price for farmers historically, but they are paying more for fuel and fertilizer. Still, they are making money.
     
  12. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    I contacted Bob's Red Mill and got their wholesale pricing info. I am looking for Hard Red Wheat. For wholesale pricing you must buy 500lbs of product (Not $500 worth)

    A ton of wheat options....

    Bobs red mill .....
    $18.5 x 40 (50lb)= $740 + shipping?

    Theoretical bulk from a farmer......
    $8.5 x 33 bushels= $280.50 + shipping + winnowing work

    If I can locate a farmer or distributor then it should be worth my while. So far I have had no luck.
     
  13. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Modern combines do a pretty darned good job of winnowing as they go. It's part of their designed function. We do it because we are OCD, LOL. You wouldn't really have to. We get very little chaff when we do. I can get as much chaff from a sack of feed grain when I help my neighbor with wheat from the co-op.