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What's the best way to remove cosmoline?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by coosbaycreep, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. coosbaycreep

    coosbaycreep 9 miles South of Roseburg Active Member

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    I just got two milsurps that are completely covered in this nasty crap, and was wondering if there's an easy way to completely remove all of it.

    In the past, I've tried soaking cosmo-soaked mags in boiling water (didn't work, but I think the toxic fumes coming off of them probably killed some of the few brain cells I have left), and a whole lot of wiping with rags, and that didn't work well either. Everytime after that when I'd go shooting, more cosmoline would drip off the gun and get on my clothes. It was horrible. Having to deal with corrosive ammo is enough of a PITA, but having a bunch of nasty euro-grease oozing all over you and your gun is even worse.

    Also, one of the guns I got has a bunch of green crap in the bore. Is this copper fouling or something? Will this clean up with hoppes no.9, or is there something else I need to do to get the gun clean enough to safely fire?

    thanks
     
  2. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

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    flamethrower_straight.jpg
     
  3. 56kninja

    56kninja Portland Member

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    I think I had some cosmoline on some magazines I bought once, I used Hoppes to get it off. It took a bit of scrubbing though.

    Green stuff, sounds like copper. Try just cleaning it with hoppes.
     
  4. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

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    Just put them in the dishwasher, I'm sure the misses won't care.............
     
  5. wakejoe

    wakejoe Beaverton, OR Well-Known Member

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    Diesel!

    vin-diesel-picture-11.jpg

    (No, really. Diesel fuel.)
     
  6. Redcap

    Redcap Lewis County, WA Well-Known Member

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    The best way is a tank of water and TSP (tri-sodium phosphate), brought up to heat.
     
  7. bwells

    bwells Longview Member

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    I've had decent luck using Gun Scrubber, it's basically carb. cleaner.
     
  8. coloneltim

    coloneltim Korvallistan Member

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    Superclean and hot water did wonders for me.

    Tim
     
  9. SquackDaddy

    SquackDaddy Marion County Member

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    I've used Simple Green with good results.
     
  10. shoggoth80

    shoggoth80 Greater Seattle Area Member

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    I would argue the best way to remove cosmo depends on the parts you are dealing with. Kerosine, diesel, Ballistol, carb all will work ok on metal parts (and a lot of rags). Some people have had good luck boiling in a pan of hot water for a while too.

    For your stocks, a metal trash can, some light bulbs, and patience does the trick. Or a black trash bag, with your stock set in it left in the sun will weep it out as well. Could always shoot the snot out of it to melt it out.

    Green stuff...sounds like copper fouling... unless you were shooting something like GP11 with a beeswax seal.
     
  11. ironhead

    ironhead East of the liberal masses in Oregon Member

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    I have tried many ways of getting this man made **** off my weapons and the only thing that has really removed it completely is heat. Hot water is ok but not easy to work with. Steam, as in steam cleaner does the trick if you can find someone who has one and is willing to let you use it.
     
  12. LogicBomb

    LogicBomb Grants Pass Active Member

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    what I do is take 2 metal garbage cans, set one on top of the other and a 100w lightbulb and slowly bake the cosmo off, and brake parts cleaner for the rest
     
  13. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Getting it off the gun is easy. Getting off yourself after the gun is clean is the challenge. Don't use any of the above suggestions for that. :D
     
  14. actionflies

    actionflies Beaverton, Oregon Member

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    Mineral spirit works great. I bought a bunch of ak47 mags and dumped all of it in a tub and the next day scrub it with an old toothbrush.
     
  15. branchbuster

    branchbuster Albany Active Member

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    I used have used laquer thinner before with go results, it is nasty stuff but wont cause rusting.
     
  16. Deavis

    Deavis Mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    Cosmo on metal is pretty easy. I use gasoline... cheapest solvent out there... and a parts brush in a tub. Once done with that Simple green makes everything smell better and getss the residue.

    Wood is a whole other story. Go to milsurp boards for good advice here... but oven off (I like lemon) works good for the worst parts, turns to soap... followed by mineral spirts and then the black plastic bag locked in your vehicle all day in July is OK to get residual. wrap in newspaper and change daily.

    Cosmo in wood is horrible.
     
  17. ironhead

    ironhead East of the liberal masses in Oregon Member

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    There must be different types of cosmoline from different countries. I have soaked gun parts overnight in gas, mineral spirits, laquer thnner and the next day a toothbrush wouldn't touch it. Other times gas would do the trick. The worst was a greenish waxey crap that I never did get completely off some East German mags. I hate that stuff.
     
  18. TAT2D

    TAT2D Portland Member

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    Any time someone suggests brake cleaner in or around an 'applied heat' context, I feel compelled to recount a true story. Friend was cleaning some metal parts ahead of some welding. Used brake cleaner. When he started TIG'ing he got a whiff of something he wasn't expecting. Shut down and went to his computer for some googling. Studied up real fast. He's still with us, but got the scare of his life. There are way less unpleasant ways of offing yourself.

    In short, as I understand it, chlorine-loaded solvents (TCE) can under electric arc or high-heat convert to vapor that upon hitting the mucous membranes of your lungs convert to hydrochloric acid.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosgene

    I'm not saying don't use brake cleaner. I'm saying, just as you wouldn't smoke while working with a bucket of gasoline in your lap, don't do the things that can turn nasty with a bucket of TCE in your lap, either. And who'd a thunk?

    Better living through chemistry!
    MrB
     
  19. Browncoat

    Browncoat Clackamas, Or. Member

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    +1 on the steam. I've cleaned up a few mil-surp guns with a cheap clothes steamer I bought at K-Mart for about $60. It also has the benefit of "lifting" dents and dings on the wood.
     
  20. Platt05

    Platt05 Washington Member

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    Low odor aircraft remover, they sell ay walmart. Worked great for me