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WHAT IS THE REAL STORY ON RELOADS? I HAVE SO MUCH, SELLING FACTORY, MILITARY STUFF

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Denwhit, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. Denwhit

    Denwhit Salem, Or Active Member

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    I acquired a lot of very high quality reloads like: 20 boxes 30.06, 10 boxes 308, 8 boxes 250/3000, 38 special, etc. from a deceased master reloader. I bought these, have tested and shot these and have come to completely trust these loads. So much so, I'm thinking about selling all my military ammo. My question: since I did not build this stuff, can I sell it without any danger of getting sued or is "shooting them up" my only safe thing to do? I'd love to share this good stuff. Thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. 2Wheels4Ever

    2Wheels4Ever Central Oregon Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer

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    Just give people a heads up on what the ammo is and you should have no problem. Most people will not buy other's reloads anyways.
     
  3. PDXoriginal

    PDXoriginal PNW Well-Known Member

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    I personally won't shoot reloads I didn't make myself, I had too many problems from other's reloads.
     
  4. k7grc

    k7grc Banks, Or Active Member

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    Most reloads are sold as "components only" and is up to the purchaser to do as they feel fit. If I sold a lot of this, I'd go as far as using a "bill of sale" with a disclaimer attached.
     
  5. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    "High quality" is all relative. So you are saying they are factory reloaded by a commercial business with liability insurance? If not then from the option of most is that if they didn't load them they will not shoot them.

    As K7grc said sell them as "components only" and the buyer can choose to either shoot them or pull them down.
     
  6. Denwhit

    Denwhit Salem, Or Active Member

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    No, I'm just saying after shooting a couple of boxes of each, they were more accurate and consistent than military and most factory ammo. Thanks to everyone for their input. Good advice about selling it "as components".
     
  7. Outrider

    Outrider Oregon Active Member

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    People are hesitant to shoot the reloads of others because there is an increased risk of a problem and there is no insurance to cover that bet. Honestly if you like the stuff and trust it, just shoot through it at your own pace. There's little upside to selling it, especially if you have to sell it as components. Even with ammo prices being high right now, all it takes is one bad round where someone loses a gun and/or gets injured and you've got a problem.

    Regarding liability, you can be sued anything. The issues are how much it will cost to defend and whether someone can successfully win. The cost of defense can be high even if you prevail. The profit you are looking at making by selling reloaded ammo is low. While the risk of a defective round is low if the reloader knew what he was doing, it's still there. The risk you are taking by selling reloaded ammo is not justified by whatever profit you think you can eke out of it. One defective round can destroy a firearm and cause an injury that opens you up to thousands of dollars of liability. In short, it's not worth it.
     
  8. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Northern Idaho Member

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    If I didn't see what went into the case, it doesn't go into my gun, period!
     
  9. iGun

    iGun Pacific NW Active Member

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    +1 on this. Double charge? Wrong powder? Squib? Screw that.
     
  10. BAMCIS

    BAMCIS Eugene Well-Known Member

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    You can do what you want. But I tend to think it is impossible to have too much ammo. Having said that shoot it all yourself.
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon California Member

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    If you trust them, then sell the factory ammo you have in those calibers and assume the risks of the reloads yourself. You are the only one who knows their history and seem to be happy with them. I know most will not trust any but the own or professionally assembled ammo from a licensed reloader or factory ammo. I have received free reloads before and was a bit apprehensive about shooting them as they were given to be from the family of a deceased reloader. It was 1300 rounds of .38 Special with a 158 gr LSWC. I shot all of it off without a single issue......but in doing so I assumed any risk if anything were to go bad. Not all reloads are bad, but there are some out there.
     
  12. MarkAd

    MarkAd Port Orchard Well-Known Member

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    I would keep and use the ammo myself.
     
  13. Trailboss

    Trailboss Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    It's also ok to pull the bullets, dump the powder, load your own powder and reseat the bullet.
     
  14. VancouverKid

    VancouverKid Vancouver Member

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    I put nearly 2000 rounds of reloaded 9mm through my old Taurus and never had one problem. It was all reloads from a friend of a friend, I never even met the guy, but he was solid and vouched for. Add in what my friends bought, and we used around 10k rounds total from the guy. Never a problem.

    The trouble is that if you don't know the reloader, see his setup, watch him do it, you just don't know if he's the guy who sends the kids off with the wife for the day, puts on some calm music, takes the phone off the hook and pays attention to what he's doing; or is he the guy who gets high, downs a 12 pack, cranks some death metal and starts cranking away with his hound dogs underfoot and his drinkin' buddies doing beer bongs in his kitchen.
     
  15. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Even the most diligent reloader can slip up once in a while! If you are comfortable with the rounds shoot them yourself.
     
  16. Denwhit

    Denwhit Salem, Or Active Member

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    That's what I'll do. How do you "pull" a bullet? The only way I can remember is loading the shell into that little hammer thing and banging away until the bullet falls out. Is that still the way?
     
  17. k7grc

    k7grc Banks, Or Active Member

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    yep, my grandkids get a "dime a round".
     
  18. Trailboss

    Trailboss Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Hornady makes a bullet puller die that grabs the bullet so you can pull the casing down, separating the two. Very clean way of doing it.
     
  19. iGun

    iGun Pacific NW Active Member

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    There's also an RCBS bullet puller die that some (including me) like better than the Hornady.
     
  20. Denwhit

    Denwhit Salem, Or Active Member

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    Does one size fit all with that bullet puller die? Or, do you need certain caliber dies to pull bullets?i