Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

What is Most Important in Training?

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by David Bowman, May 21, 2016.

  1. David Bowman

    David Bowman Beaverton OR Archer Defense Concepts

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    462
    I am looking to fine tune some of our course offerings for the upcoming 12 months and I would love to know what NWFA members think of when considering paying for training and finding out what is most important to them.

    Please check all that apply, and suggestions are always welcome.
     
  2. v0lcom13sn0w

    v0lcom13sn0w Keizer, or Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,275
    Likes Received:
    3,731
    i said rep of trainer. safety is my biggest thing and should be expressed/discussed before training even begins for the day.
     
    Koda likes this.
  3. Capn Jack

    Capn Jack Wet-Stern Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    1,759
    Likes Received:
    1,818
    Safety X2, but if the instructor shows up in BDU,Flack Vest, helmet and leg holster...:eek:

    I'm out of there...:p
     
    v0lcom13sn0w and Joe13 like this.
  4. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    10,849
    Price is an issue for me in life right now. So I checked amount of ammo needed as well.

    I also checked difficulty. I don't need 4 hours of "this is the front of your gun where the boolets come out". There are already so many of those.

    Trainer Rep - well, I have seen too many self proclaimed ex navy seals with 12 years special forces experience get debunked as frauds so word of mouth Rep would mean more then credentials .

    Days of training I'd like multi day trainings that give you a chance to go home and rest and let your brain soak up the input and then go reapply it the next day as opposed to one 8 hour day.

    I couldn't afford a week long course but I'm sure there are plenty who could.
     
    x2ndxall, Ura-Ki and etrain16 like this.
  5. Ura-Ki

    Ura-Ki Sub Light Speed Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,519
    Likes Received:
    7,575
    I'm with Joe13 on this! Rep is very important, how often does the trainer get new info, and how does it apply. I like having a few days to let things sink in and help form questions. I also like availability of classes during the week, and a small class size to instructor ratio. I also like having options so I can tune or have tuned to my needs. I also like shooting options geared towards real world situations, and not shooting for group sizes. For my hard earned money, having multiple options available is going to get my business. Lastly, having the option of continuing to fine tune skills learned with a good instructor on a one on one sure is going to bring me back!
     
    x2ndxall and Joe13 like this.
  6. etrain16

    etrain16 Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    8,470
    Likes Received:
    19,444
    Reputation is probably #1. But cost and distance are a very close #2. # of rounds factors directly into cost. For me personally, one day clinics are better than multiple day due to my schedule. I'd also rather not travel for a class - as that bumps cost up even further.
     
    Joe13 likes this.
  7. David Bowman

    David Bowman Beaverton OR Archer Defense Concepts

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    462
    I try to tailor my courses to meet 2 objectives: Ease of students learning the technique and doing it as safely as possible.

    I cover about 5 minutes of safety (orient you to the range, tell you where the first aid supplies are, point out where the restrooms are, go over the 4 rules and cover anything the venue would like covered) and then we are off and running.

    Our classes only support 8 people (along with the insurance), and it helps me keep track of students.

    Oh, and I don't wear anything "tactical"

    I have been considering some classes during the week, because not everyone has a Mon to Fri 8-5 kind of schedule, so I like to hear that there would be someone interested in that.
     
    Ura-Ki likes this.
  8. ChiefStealth

    ChiefStealth Graham, Wa. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    399
    Yea. But, I also don't need running, and kneeling behind barrels, and shooting prone, and generally acting like some twenty year old. I'm saying the training needs to be suitable for the trainee, and not just a scripted set of actions that the trainer thinks are cool things to do.
     
  9. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    10,849
    To each his own I guess.

    I was just pointing out that there far more "Intro classes" then anything advanced.

    I'm fat and don't want to run but walking a trail with pop out targets would be fun.

    Don't over think it - I'm not a mall ninja.
     
  10. x2ndxall

    x2ndxall WA Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    848
    Likes Received:
    2,085
    If I were to take a class, reputation of the outfit would be the only serious consideration, unless there were multiple outfits with the same stellar rep. Then schedule would come in.
    Only after those considerations would be the cost. Kind of like buying tools. I'd much rather pay $100 for something that works than $5 for something that doesn't.

    Difficulty is a tough one from a business standpoint. I think the reason there are so many beginner classes is simply that beginners are more likely to take a class. Most are fine with just the introductory lessons as they just want to know how to safely handle firearms.

    I personally would have no interest at all unless it was really challenging/difficult. But I'm sure I'm a minority in that respect?

    Just my $.02. Didn't mean to turn it into an essay:eek:
     
    Ura-Ki likes this.
  11. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss Klamath-Siskyou Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    642
    Likes Received:
    1,134
    I checked reputation and price. Specifically, for me, included in the reputation of the trainer is their attitude. I'm not up for someone who has a need to prove themselves, or show how tough they are or dazzle with cow excrement. I want to learn and practice, be challenged, and come away with new insight and development of skills, not be in a tacti-cool contest or a ego fest.
    Realistically, I don't know if I'll ever have the opportunity or money for a class, and my resources are usually books and videos, followed up by my own research and practice, and for my temperament that's just fine. Feedback from others and continued research shows I'm pretty good at acquiring and mastering concepts, but certainly wouldn't turn down an opportunity to have professional instruction if it ever were to be affordable or opportune.
     
    Ura-Ki and x2ndxall like this.
  12. mcfoto

    mcfoto Newberg Active Member

    Messages:
    192
    Likes Received:
    159
    I am always interested in improving. The biggest factor for me right now is location. Since I shoot USPSA, I tend to train with instructors who do also but most of those are located a couple hours drive from me.
     
  13. SCARed

    SCARed Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    285
    I've been in numerous "beginner" classes and can tell you there's a big difference between a "never shot a gun" beginner class and a "lets master the fundamentals" class. On paper they go over the same stuff, but in reality they are very different.

    I'm also critical of the instructor and when they learned what they teach. If you show nothing but a "NRA instructor" on your bio, not a chance in hell I'd even consider you. If you were prior military, what decade? And what did you actually do. Shooting has changed a lot over the past 20years.

    I'm fortunate in that I do have access to some vetted high speed, high level BAMFs that have been training other high level BAMFs, as their job in the military.
    Training with them it's all about the basics. First, mastering the basics while standing. Then mastering the basics while moving. After that, mastering the basics while engaging multiple targets.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2016
    x2ndxall and OutlawHoss like this.
  14. AndyinEverson

    AndyinEverson Everson, Wa. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,026
    Likes Received:
    6,561
    I picked several of the options , but reputation counts the most with me.
    I would look for someone who tailors the class to meet my needs.
    And I would definitely stay away from the classes and schools that state that they are "the end all ,be all" of whatever it is I want to learn or improve upon.
    Andy
     
    x2ndxall, Ura-Ki and Joe13 like this.
  15. Highsite

    Highsite Maple Valley New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    9
    The best training is the one that focuses on safety and mechanics... train slow, detailed and from every position for fast and accurate engagement. If this isn't second to safety in your instructors curriculum then find another instructor. A good instructor will also teach you how to run and develop your own drills and not just how to stand, hold and fire.
     
  16. NWGlockgal

    NWGlockgal Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Likes Received:
    1,780
    Combination of price and reputation. Thunder Ranch may have a terrific rep, but I can't afford it.
     
    EVILZ and x2ndxall like this.
  17. ChiefStealth

    ChiefStealth Graham, Wa. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    399
    Something I'd like to add pertaining to the reputation of the trainer. Don't insult me with your marketing bubblegum. Don't presume to say that somehow people aren't really trained unless they have attended your training. Like somehow only your training is correct. There's another thread going on that is a good example of that. The author implying that a person isn't properly trained until his course is taken. Total bubblegum. As soon as I read something like that, I stop reading and disregard anything further from that poster. You're not gaining trainees when you are selling them marketing bamboozle.
     
    x2ndxall and OutlawHoss like this.
  18. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,873
    Likes Received:
    5,770
    A gun that fits your hand properly.
     
  19. Derbel McDillet

    Derbel McDillet Kitsap County, WA Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    21
    This one isn't in your poll - good, relevant course content. And an accurate description of what's taught in the course and course objectives.
     
    The Courier and x2ndxall like this.
  20. The Nothing

    The Nothing PDX Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    333
    All of the above, really...

    Right now, it's all about scheduling. Hell, I've paid for a course that I haven't been able to take because of scheduling. I had one opportunity and missed it. Sucks working weekends.