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What gun is this? Remington 1917 Maybe

Discussion in 'Rifle Discussion' started by korntera, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. korntera

    korntera Oregon Member

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    I picked up a Remington 1917 in 30-06 about a year ago, it was cheap, seemed like an OK 30-06 and i was bored waiting for a friend so I bought it. Serial # is 2931**. I have no idea about this rifle, its value, history all that, I did use the googles but mine looks a hair different than those online, and I paid WAY LESS which makes me think mine is different. Thoughts? Pics below.

    It has all the markings from the 1917 info I can find, fireball thing, serial number means it was built July 1918 and it has eagles stamped on almost every part. I paid only $175 for it AT a gun shop but 1917's go from $425 to $1,500
     
  2. QXSOUP

    QXSOUP Portland, OR Member

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    It is for sure a 1917 Enfield. you can tell by the bolt handle. The stock has been cut down.

    They are great shooters and is what Sgt. Alvin York used...
     
  3. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    If it were in original military configuration, it would easily fetch that $400. In the sporterized condition, its still worth about what you paid for it...
     
  4. korntera

    korntera Oregon Member

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    I read about York, that is quite a story, any approx price range on one in this condition or do you need more info.
     
  5. korntera

    korntera Oregon Member

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    What does sporterized mean? It says remington not eddystone on it.
     
  6. gunluvver

    gunluvver Hillsboro, OR Member

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    Your 1917 has had extensive modifications done to it. The rear sight used to be mounted to the rear receiver ring with 2 ears to protect it. Those are usually the first to go in a sporterization. The barrel was dovetailed for a sight and another sight is mounted over the chamber. It's worth what you paid for it, and is too far gone to ever be restored to military configuration. The action is popular for building magnum rifles. The cock on closing feature, if still present on your rifle, can be changed to cock on opening if preferred.
     
  7. gehrheart

    gehrheart fidalgo island Well-Known Member

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    Not entirely correct. After the war, Remington had plenty left laying around and knew the value of the action. They proceed to produce the model 30. The model 30 is much rarer to find. Comes with factory walnut sporter stock. Standard iron sights, no "wings" a pep sight. Outstanding gun. I have a couple guns built off the 1917 (mix from Remington-Winchester- and a couple Eddystones.) I only have one model 30 and its a beauty.

    But yes this is a std pattern 1917 Remington that has been "sporterized"

    One of my favored actions for building on. :D

    Here. --- Model 30 Bolt Action Centerfire Rifle
    --- http://www.remington.com/products/archived/centerfire/bolt-action/model-30-express.aspx
     
  8. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    To give you a real good idea of the retail value of this rifle. In a Pawn shop here in Woodburn is a 1917 Remington that has had the rear sight cut off the barrel shortened (no front dovetail) Had the receiever drilled for scope mounts. The stock was replaced with a VERY nice Monte carlo style sporter stock in straight grain walnut with nice caps. It has a Leopold Rifleman 3-9X on it in excellent condition. the rifle has a good looking bore and the Bluing was obviously redone (excellent job) and a heavy leather sling. My son seriously considered buying it.

    Asking price was $399.00 best deal to an active duty Sailor (my son) was $350.00

    I don't see yours as quite the same level as the one in Woodburn.
     
  9. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    A sporterized 1917 would have to be something special for me to pay more than $175...
     
  10. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Agreed but then both of us are out of touch with the market of today. Try to find any nice 30-06 for less then $350.00 anywhere (save the plastic on sale Savages and Mossbergs at somewhere like Bi Mart) If it has a Wood stock you'll be lucky to find used under $350.00
     
  11. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    No, I'm pretty much in touch with the market, at least the local one. I table at several gunshows, cruise the local shops, and other. Incidentally, the cheap entry level gun would be a Savage Axis in .30-06 for 299.99$...

    Most of the VERY sporterized Enfields I see around Central Oregon are right around $150 to $200...
     
  12. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Ah I'm in the valley so at shows a $300.00 rifle is rare to see. <aybe I should wander over your side of the pass.
     
  13. philinchaos

    philinchaos Detroit New Member

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    The sporterized Remington model 1917 is probably the best deal in surplus firearms, possibly the strongest military action made. Custom builders use them for 375 HandH and .458 Win. Mag.
     
  14. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    Actually it ran a distant third in the WWII military action strength department. When I was in gunsmith school, our instructor, who was a huge history buff told us the Garand finished first (surprised me), then the early war Jap Arisakas (not the late war bonzai guns), then the 1917.

    Properly done, the 1917 can make a heck of a nice custom rifle. It's suitable or can be made so for the longest commercial cartridges available. But by the time you spend the money, you could probably have a nice CZ safari sporter for cheaper. The amount of machining needed to change the action to a commercial quality action is considerable...
     
  15. philinchaos

    philinchaos Detroit New Member

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    Mountainbear,
    I had read that the Arisaka was rated as strongest military action,when done right. I also read that their tolerances were all over the board and have you ever seen a model 99 in anything besides 7.7 or a model 38 in anything but 6.5. Don't get me wrong they are cool reliable and bullet proof but would you consider using one for the basis of a target rifle? I would never alter an original, but I can't recall ever seeing one that was sporterized. Your comment on the Garrand blew me away. How can a gas fed automatic be the strongest military action? Rebarrel for 375 H and H or .458 Win Mag, head space and recontour bolt head, pull trigger...and find bolt 300 yards behind your starting point. I'm sorry, that was kind of a smart *** comment, but I have never seen over size recoil springs that were not for different 30-06 bullet weights.
     
  16. coop44

    coop44 Tacoma ,WA Well-Known Member

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    the garand is indeed strong, but its adaptability to other calibers is pretty limited given its magazine and bolt design. The 1917 on the other hand is quite adaptable to other calibers, the 1914, its .303 cousin is even better suited to belted magnum conversion, due to its extractor and magazine being designed for a larger based rimmed cartridge. The "trick" at one time was to rechamber the 1917 for 300 win mag (no barrel change) and use the 1914 bolt, magazine box and follower, thus leaving the only real modifications to be done to the feed lips on the reciever.

    Pity about the rear sight on yours, but way back these were considered cheap surplus, I haven't seen to many unaltered ones around. I would value yours at $150-$200.

    Arisakas in 7.7 have been converted to 30-'06, but why invest time and effort into a really ugly gun? I personally consider them to be unacceptable for anything but a wall hanger.
     
  17. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the Garand thing blew me away as well. But the gentleman I heard it from certainly has credentials, both as a gunsmith and historian, so I tended to give him the benefit of the doubt.

    The Arisaka is exceptionally strong. I have seen them built into "hunter" calibers (06' etc...) as well as sporterized in their original calibers. They are not generally considered by professionals as "top-tier" actions to start a custom build on. The very large, almost bulbous safety on the rear of the bolt is an aesthetic nightmare for many people. The fit and finish was rough on many examples as well. I have seen these turned into beautiful sporter rifles, but they would never be my first choice.

    At this point, I would not alter an original Arisaka, especially one with the imperial chrysanthemum still intact. For that matter, there are very few complete military rifles (Mausers, Garands, Enfields) that I would take from original configuration. Two factors here. One, there aren't very many complete, original configuration (and even fewer numbers matching originals, due to both civilian and military rebuilds) rifles left in circulation. Many that do exist are in private collections and won't return to circulation until their owners pass. Second, there are plenty of both half sporterized mausers and enfields, as well as quality and readily available commercial actions to start a project on.

    My preference is for finding already sporterized (usually non drilled and tapped) rifles and either completing the job, or redoing the job. I currently have several projects in my shop being built. Included are: one Siamese Mauser, two Turk Mausers (a lot of finish work needed), two Swedish Mausers, a Chilean small ring Mauser, and a WWII German (1943) Mauser that is actually getting restored, not sporterized. Most of these rifles are for myself or for family members. I no longer carry an FFL or manufacturers license, so I don't do public work anymore. Besides, its very difficult to find a market for a 3000$ custom Mauser, which with the cost of machining and stock work, these can get to that price quickly.

    The above statements about the Garand (from Coop) are pretty well the skinny on why you don't see Garands converted around all that often.
     
  18. JGRuby

    JGRuby Portland Oregon New Member

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    I had my now retired gun smith build a 338-06 on a 1917 action - it is one of my favorite rifles and I have shot it a lot in 10 years. In my limited experience the biggest problem with the 1917 action is that is very heavy. As far as the Arisaka's go I hate the safety on them - I had a Arisaka that had been rebarreld and built into a 256 manlicher - nice little rifle excpet the saftey was not very functional in my opinion.

    Respectfully

    James Ruby