Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

What does the -2 number after

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by warnerwh, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    the model number mean on Smith and Wessons? If it was a model 19-1 would that mean it is the first generation of model 19's made? Thanks
     
  2. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    It would be the second revision.

    For example the model 19 would be the original gun released, 19-1 would be the first revision, 19-2 would be the second, ect. If you want to think of it as "generations" (you glock guys!), 19-2 would be the third generation.
     
  3. Kennedy

    Kennedy Beaverton Member

    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    1
    Fountain of Knowledge...
     
  4. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    Thank you. That's been bothering me for a while. Owning mostly Dan Wessons but wanting to purchase a Smith made me curious.
     
  5. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    Are you buying a 19?
     
  6. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    I'm not buying a 19 but possibly a .22.
     
  7. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    Oh cool, a K22, 17, 18, or 617?

    I have a 18, and its a great gun!
     
  8. browntown

    browntown Salem, Oregon, United States Active Member

    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    26
    get a 63 kit gun if you can find one, I'd stay away from the new light weight 317's, they just don't have the smith and wesson feel to them
     
  9. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    I'll be buying a K22, 17 or 617. A 63 would work also but isn't my first choice. It will be a close match to my .357's and .44 target revolvers all of which are Dan Wessons. The .22 Dan Wessons are expensive and the K22 series are excellent guns with outstanding accuracy. The reasons for the excellent accuracy in Dan Wessons doesn't carry over with the .22.
    It's time to teach my daughter how to use firearms and this heavy .22 will work well. Even my lightest center fire loads have a blast and jolt that may be or I should say probably difficult for a beginner to deal with.
     
  10. browntown

    browntown Salem, Oregon, United States Active Member

    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    26
  11. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    The K22 would be my first choice but as you say they're expensive. My wife and I are both laid off so I have to compromise sometimes. Would you guys way the newer K22 or 17,617 are as good of quality as the old K22?
     
  12. browntown

    browntown Salem, Oregon, United States Active Member

    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    26
    I prefer the older ones, non MIM parts, no lock, better hand fitting. Depends. I own six smith's and feel the older ones are better put together, but if you talk to the gun shop guys they swear the new ones are just as good as the old. Really comes down to what you can get a good deal on, and to YOU feels right.
     
  13. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    I prefer the older ones as well, the early 617s are built nicely though.
     
  14. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    I ended up buying a 617 for 385.00 today with target trigger, hammer and sights. What I'm very impressed with is the trigger. This trigger is excellent in single and double action.

    Also I took off the grip and found a screw pressing against the leaf spring. It appears the screw can be used to adjust the trigger's weight of pull. I didn't try it because it's crisp and light already.

    I'm very impressed with this gun. Out to the range tomorrow to test accuracy and sight it in.
     
  15. tattoo

    tattoo NorthWest Active Member

    Messages:
    679
    Likes Received:
    43
    I have the 617 10 shot 6 inch and it is great. Have a great and inexpensive time.:)
     
  16. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

    Messages:
    4,132
    Likes Received:
    155
    Oh by the way. DO NOT dryfire the rimfire revolvers, the firing pin is offset and it will cause damage. Use snap caps :D

    And yes, that screw in the front is to adjust tension of the mainspring, but the spring is so light on the rimfires, I never bother adjusting mine.
     
  17. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    Accuracy is truly excellent so I'm very pleased. Haven't fired a .22 handgun in a couple of decades or more. It was very enjoyable and cheap. This gun has a permanent home.
     
  18. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    175
    That is called the strain screw or tension screw. By design it is intended to be screwed in tight. A experienced smith can change the length of this screw to adjust trigger pull weight. Remove to much and you can have miss fires and/or knuckling.
     
  19. warnerwh

    warnerwh Portland, OR Member

    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    22
    The strikes are sharp and deep. The trigger could be a half pound lighter but I'll do that after my daughter has learned safety and fundamentals. She was the main reason for this purchase. I pretty much forgot about .22's but after taking this gun out and having a good time I'll be using it with some regularity.
     
  20. Natty Bumpo

    Natty Bumpo Clackamas County Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    347
    Likes Received:
    34
    I have owned quite a number of .22 revolvers over the years.

    My Model 17, circa 1960, is the only one I would never sell. In terms of accuracy and shoot-ability, it is easily the best at the range. For field guns, I prefer the higher grade autos such as the Woodsman or the S&W kit-guns, such as the Models 35 (steel) or 43 (alloy).

    You can easily waste a lot of money (I have) on trying things you will be happy with for only awhile.