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what do you have in your first aid kit?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by bmbowman, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. bmbowman

    bmbowman Vancouver WA New Member

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    Like the title says, what do you have in your first aid kit? I am preparing one and was wondering what others had in theirs.
     
  2. twoclones

    twoclones Tri-Cities, WA Well-Known Member

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    Would depend on the situation...
    The 'kit' I carry when working alone in the mountains is more of a patch kit to stop bleeding, splint breaks and treat/prevent shock. I have 2 rolls of tape {3/4" first-aid and 2" vet tape} plus a space blanket. I also carry a good, windproof lighter and Spot Messenger. My Spot subscription includes evacuation insurance to cover that helicopter ride to serious medical attention...
     
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  3. knuckle Head

    knuckle Head southeast Well-Known Member

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    Are we talking SHTF, home, backpacking or vehicle kits??? We coulf probably have forum for each one
     
  4. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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  5. receo

    receo Sandy, Oregon Active Member

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    I use to use a fully supplie med kit. I'm talking bvm's, opa's, npa's. Hot and cold packs, numerous types of tape bandages and dressings. Throw in an emergency blanket, suture kit, ventilation mask, misc pharmaceuticals and some tongue depressors. Maybe a Sam splint or to and burn/anti microbial ointments. Tack on a first aid guide some saline and an IV start kit. Now that im older and questionably wiser, I carry only 2 pair of nitrile gloves. Thatss it nothing else.
    1, I protect myself from the nasties that people have and in my opinion everyone has hep c, HIV, mersa and bad breath. The gloves and my sunglasses help protect me from those nasties.
    2. By nipping off a portion of the middle finger I have an acceptable ventilation device where I can administer rescue breaths with little fear of disease transmission.
    3. Applying direct pressure to a severe bleed with a gloved Hand is still the prefered method to control severe bleeding.
    4. Nitrile gloves can make an effective flutter type dressing for open chest wounds.
    5. Easy to store and they don't cost much.
     
  6. Buddhalux

    Buddhalux Hillsboro, Oregon Active Member

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    You need tape as well to hold an occlusive dressing in place for a sucking chest wound due to the need to "burp" the wound occasionally.
     
  7. receo

    receo Sandy, Oregon Active Member

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    Tape is handy in alot of situations I won't deny that. But the dressing can be held on three sides by hand.
     
  8. Buddhalux

    Buddhalux Hillsboro, Oregon Active Member

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    And then you can't treat the patient anymore because one hand is holding a bandage on.
     
  9. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    It depends on where I am what I have. I am a medic and one of my jobs is on wildland firs so I have more gear at then I know what to do with. I will say the gear I carry I can do more then one thing with. The more things it will do the better.

    In my normal DCB (daily carry bag) I keep 1 of the military style FIRST AID Field Dressing Compressed Bandage 4X6X7 inch on eBay! dressings cause you can use it for many things. I carry 1 http://www.swattourniquet.com/ again you can do many things with it and the 2 of these easily fit in a small space. I also carry a few bandaids, gloves and some tape (I prefer the fiber packing tape).

    The http://www.amazon.com/Israeli-Battle-Dressing-Compression-Bandage/dp/B003DPVERM are also quite nice but take up more room.

    Like any other kit or bag you need to figure out when you think you are going to use it, how you are going to use it and when you are going to use it. My gear list changes when I am on normal duty, if I am on ski patrol, if I am responding with my local volunteer fire dept. I am on a wildland fire where I am doing medivac I will have way more gear then if I am hiking 5 miles + a day with the crews, or if I am in a truck or an ATV. It all just depends and you really need to find out what your situation is going to be (or what you are planning for) before you can build a good kit.
     
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  10. A.I.P.

    A.I.P. UpperUS Active Member

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    AMP II Blood Stopper Kit
    Space Blanket
    Gorilla tape
    Tiny GP IFAK
    Tiny light
     
  11. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    Brining this thread back from the dead.

    I have a Drago pack that has since been mangled BUT it makes a great dedicated EMT bag.. If one of the straps was t broken it'd sill be my EDC pack.

    This isnt a bug out bag or an assault bag anymore, this is strictly for medical supplies. Small things that come up regularly that would be nice to have everything for.

    I have the whole gambit of:

    Vitamins/minerals
    Sleeping pills
    Headache and anti inflammatory pills.
    Caffine pills
    Water
    Honey for eating
    Small (immediate) rations of food as well as three larger MRE meals
    Water filtering devices (stick, light and chems) as well as a small metal pot, aluminum bottle and plasic bottle.

    Wound care:
    Typica small first aid kit.
    Compression packs
    Vaseline
    Duct tape
    Paracord
    Rope and other tourniquet devices
    Splint material/wraps
    Typical antiseptics, alcohol hydrogen peroxide and salt and sugar
    Emerg. Honey for wound care
    (I need to add blood clotting agents and or sponges but I have little experiance with new stuff)
    Gloves, cotton swabs, large and small plastic bags as well as large gallon freezer bags.

    Thermal aid:
    Blankets
    Spare socks, gloves, shirt and sweat pants as well as underwear
    A few instant heat packs as well as fire starting gear and tinder.

    Knives as well as small scissors, I need to add a better/larger pair for cloth cutting.

    Of course the typical:
    Extra Duct tape
    Lights
    Extra paracord

    For those that are more EMT oriented, what other gear would you say you use regularly? Im in need of a few extra ideas. I like having contingency plans for everything, extra ideas or tips would help. :D
     
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  12. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

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  13. thorborg

    thorborg portland oregon Well-Known Member 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Neosporin and a sewing kit.
     
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  14. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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  15. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    The sweing kit is a great idea, I cant believe I didnt think of it.
     
  16. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    sewing or suture kit?
     
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  17. ZA_Survivalist

    ZA_Survivalist Oregon AK's all day.

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    For mine, sewing.
    But a suture kit wouldnt be a bad idea.. If a wound was that bad, unless my own.. Id be out of my element sewing someone up.
     
  18. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    ^^^^Both! I carry suture kits as well as a pretty comprehensive sewing kit. It includes needles with big enough eyes to use the inner strands of 550 cord!
     
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  19. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    without having done suturing it is also difficult to know what you would need.

    Like this module is pretty good. Though it does not seem to include a hemostat (fancy tweezers to hold the curved needles) It has a sterile syringe but no lidocaine. kind of weird since it is really not complete.

    http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/04611/M-TRAVEL/-Chinook-Travel-Suture-Module-

    It is pretty easy to learn though. Pig skin from the butcher is a great media to practice on (except no blood to deal with)

    I had a bandsaw accident a few weeks ago and needed 3 sutures in my thumb. The lidocaine block did not work and since it was only 3 sutures I just had them do it to see what it felt like.

    It was painful, worse than the original cut, but bearable. So I have a pretty good idea what it would feel like to suture myself with no anesthesia.
     
  20. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Lots of nerves in those thumbs! Yikes!
     
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