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I'm about to start loading for 45-70 and have some Hornady brass which is also shorter than standard 45-70 brass.
I have a special Redding "45-70 FTX" crimp die inbound to deal with the shorter cases.

Supposedly it (shorter case) has something to do with the shape of the FTX bullet.
From the web...

Apparently the reason is because it holds the FTX flex tip bullet which is a little longer than normal 45-70 bullets, yet has to stay at an overall length that will function in a lever gun (and other techie stuff like ogive, cannelure, seating depth, etc.).
 

Ironbar

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Did some 147gr 9mm after work today!

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Lennie

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i love starline brass, but don't always have that option. mine are home rolled. running rugers. thinking trim to is 1.285. have come across some factory hornady cases that were short. that 225gr. flextip is a great bullet. running mine at about 1400. both b/h's love em..
you are loading for other than b/h's?
Have you considered using a Lee Carbide crimp die? It eliminates the need to have all the cases trimmed to exact length and removes the resultant bulge, which often prevents chambering of the round, when crimping cases that are to long. The Lee crimp die comes in carbide or steel, however I feel carbide is the best choice-especially if you are running a progressive loader with a carbide sizing die.

 
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I loaded a ton in the last week, mostly over the weekend.
Fun fact... 3000 rounds of misc ammo weighs about 90lbs :s0115:

These are some new coated 220g rounds I haven't loaded or shot before. Plan to A/B them against some plated 220g rounds soon.

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Have you considered using a Lee Carbide crimp die? It eliminates the need to have all the cases trimmed to exact length and removes the resultant bulge, which often prevents chambering of the round, when crimping cases that are to long. The Lee crimp die comes in carbide or steel, however I feel carbide is the best choice-especially if you are running a progressive loader with a carbide sizing die.

i resize 45 colt with both a hornady nitride and rcbs carbide die. what i was refering to with the shorter hornady cases was that they started making "shorter" loads for the many chambers that cannot chamber a full 45 colt load with their ftx bullet seated properly in the cannalure. aka in 6-shooters, with their 225 ftx the tip is longer than the cylinder. possibly a full length 45 colt load may not work in rifles chambered today with that bullet. i have no problem with seating and crimping to include the speer shot capsules. but, both of mine are new model b/h's.
 

ageingstudent

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Thanks! I was a bit nervous shooting them since I learned off of youtube. I have several questions I'll be running by you all soon.

View attachment 856564
Pretty common. I totally got the flopsweat with my first reloads years ago. I was having a grand time making my first workups until I put my finger on the trigger and it got real :s0112: . Still have my fingers and eyes. You will gain confidence. Never get overconfident and pay attention to details and you will be fine.
 

gmerkt

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Yesterday, 40 rounds of 28 gauge shot shells. Specialty shells, 20 each .535 lead round ball 182 gr.; and 20 each #4 buckshot, 16 pellets.

I only load specialty shells for my 28 gauge. Birdshot I buy store-bought. Or used to; I've got lots and plenty to last me a long time. When my grandson and I were out with the gun the other day, the box of Winchester Super Speed 3/4 oz. #6 shot was marked $2.55. Paper hulls.

My 28 ga. specialty loads are truly "hand loaded." I don't have a shotgun press. What I have is a little shell vise that locks in one hull at a time. I have a small arbor press that I use to seat the wad. I close the shell with a roll crimp tool in a DeWalt cordless drill. I dispense my powder with the same RCBS powder measure that I use for centerfire work. I don't re-work used hulls; some years ago I bought bags of new, primed Fiocchi hulls and they weren't much more expensive than shot shell primers alone. At least at the time.

My last batch of #4 buckshot was dated 2015 and I was running low. We fired some at a Dish Network TV antenna (steel dish), the #14 pellets penetrated the steel and went on through, the pattern was good. Oh, the Dish Network thing was abandoned on the ground, wasn't on somebody's roof. Just to be clear.

I don't use a buffer on the buckshot.

My 28 gauge is very versatile with these specialty rounds. I've also got some Foster slugs loaded up for it.

Then there's the 9mm Luger chamber sleeve. I can put 9mm bullets inside a 6 inch black target center consistently at 30 yards. With the shotgun bead sight. But I think the #4 buckshot would be better as a home defensive round. One shot would be very persuasive. Or even 3/4 oz. of birdshot in the legs will slow a guy down. Or hurry him up the Hell out of there. I don't know much about these things, not having been an LEO or in a home defense situation. But it seems to me that in 90% of cases, that first shot fired would be the decisive one. To cripple or cause flight. Don't need a .44 magnum or AR-15 to do that.

The reason 4 of the round ball shells are shorter is because I ran out of a certain kind of brush wad, had to change to a different one for the last 4.
P4100757.JPG



9mm in 28 ga. chanber sleeve:
P4100758.JPG
 
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