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I just found this thread but haven't gone completely through it, so not sure if this has been mentioned or not.

Biggest peeve for me is people who ignore or are lazy at following range safety rules.

The most egregious and common broken rule I've observed is people uncasing their firearm at the work bench at the back of the range, NOT at the firing line. This happens most often with pistols at an indoor range.

They're moving their firearm around at the back table, adjusting stuff, adding or removing gear, getting it ready. The muzzle is pointing everywhere, except ONLY down range. Sometimes they're staging multiple firearms.

Then they move to the firing-line bench or pedestal, rack the slide and put a chamber flag in it.

While they were working at the back table, as well as when they turned with the firearm in their hand to walk to the firing line, they flagged me and everyone else in the room a couple of times.

How can they be sure when they uncased their firearm that they hadn't left a round in the chamber from their last range visit? It happens to the best of us.

Newbies do this a lot. It's entertaining to watch it happen at the Clackamas Public Safety Training Center. Depending on the RSO working at the time, you either get your ears chewed off, or kicked out for the day. (Bless those RSOs.)

For an experienced shooter to do this at a range, even if they are by themselves at the time, is, IMO, lazy safety practice. And lazy safety practice is how negligent discharges (and people being shot) happen.

Take what you like and leave the rest.

Cheers.
 
Has anyone said pistol "braces" and bump stocks yet? Cause those are dumb. Just in case I missed it. Haha.
 
Gun Store counter commandos with no practical experience regurgitating a new gun accolades straight outta a penned 'paid" advertisement in a gun rag.
 
IBiggest peeve for me is people who ignore or are lazy at following range safety rules.
Ah, that reminds me. On the list of peeves.... fudd RSO's with God complexes that don't understand their job description. Confusing only being present to intervene to ensure the safety and fun for all with being duty bound to micromanage each shooter and offer unsolicited advice as condescendingly as possible.🤣
 
Has anyone said pistol "braces" and bump stocks yet? Cause those are dumb. Just in case I missed it. Haha.
Well somebody had to say it! But not me. No sir!

However, aesthetically, IMO, the brace looks better than the un- circumcised penis looking TOOB sticking out the back.
 
Well somebody had to say it! But not me. No sir!

However, aesthetically, IMO, the brace looks better than the un- circumcised penis looking TOOB sticking out the back.
SBR looks more better. Haha.
 
One of mine is what passes for a gun show here in the Olympia area. Last two times I went to the Big Top show at the Thurston County Fairgrounds it was basically one single dealer plus a half dozen other small vendors of misc crap. I was born and lived in Dallas Texas for 62 years and it took 4-5 hours to walk though every aisle at one of our gun shows if you didn't spend a lot of time at any of the tables.

I'll add that to me it is sad to see so many black rifles and so little of the vintage blue steel and wood stock stuff. When I was in my 20's and 30's there was still lots of military surplus guns and parts to buy. It wasn't hard to find Garands, M1 carbines, M1903 Springfields, 1911's, Lugers, P38s, Mauser rifles of all kinds, and all the parts for them. Of course the early AR15/M16 parts dealers started showing up too but it was mostly mil-surplus parts and used magazines. There were tons of Colt single actions and Winchester lever guns. Then when the S&W 39 and 59 were being adopted by police forces, followed by the Glock 17 and P226 there were tons of S&W revolver trade-ins. You could get a real nice S&W M10 with lots of the original blue finish left for $175. Which was a deal when the 6" blue Pythons were selling for $386 new.

And all the guys there walking around with a rifle on each shoulder with a wood dowel in the barrel with their for sale sign and info. Or the backpack with the guns for sale sign. I learned how to smile and politely ask what they had, and the art of doing the deal. Right there. Face to face. With cash. And no paperwork.

Back then there were plenty of guns available but not enough money in my life to buy all that I wanted. Now that I have the money the great vintage guns aren't there in front of me anymore. I don't consider browsing through the classifieds or Gunbroker the same thing as those huge old Texas gun shows of the 1970's and 80's.

So that's my pet peeve - that time marches on.
 
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And all the guys there walking around with a rifle on each shoulder with a wood dowel in the barrel with their for sale sign and info. Or the backpack with the guns for sale sign. I learned how to smile and politely ask what they had, and the art of doing the deal. Right there. Face to face. With cash. And no paperwork.


I never figured those guys were there to do under the table deals. You'd have to be a F'ing moron to try that. There were a couple/three local police at the shows at The EXPO Center usually. And there was usually people at the shows that would facilitate the BGCs.

I'd still go to those shows just for the heck of it, if they hadn't jacked parking up to $10.00 and the get-in fee was $13.00.
 
I never figured those guys were there to do under the table deals. You'd have to be a F'ing moron to try that. There were a couple/three local police at the shows at The EXPO Center usually. And there was usually people at the shows that would facilitate the BGCs.
This was Texas. No BGC required and no law preventing face-to-face sales between non-dealers. The actual dealers required a Form 4473. But the definition of dealer was different back then (or at least the enforcement was different) and there were guys with 6-8 guns on a table who were not FFL holders and thus no paperwork. You could sell your "personal collection" back then and not have to be a dealer.

We have become so used to our current situation as "normal" that it is hard to accept the paradigm shift required to imagine what it used to be like and how our freedom has been gradually eroded. In the 1970's in Texas you could walk into a gun show and walk out with history in your hands. That was mostly the appeal to me even in my younger days. And it is the part of gun shows that I miss the most now that I am older.

But that was nothing new. Have you ever seen a Bannerman catalog, or the post WWI ads in the early gun magazines? You used to be able to buy surplus arms through the mail, with almost no questions asked.

I think people have changed. Charles Whitman in the tower at UT Austin was such a shocking anomaly. Now some idiot shoots up their town every week. I get it that the change in people has required some changes in the laws. But it has swung really far in the direction of excessively restrictive laws. It is not as easy to be a gun guy as it used to be and I will suggest it is not as much fun either. It may be heresy to say it here, but sometimes I think the best way for us older guys with our links to the past to stay positive is to stay off the internet. The problem with that is that is is exactly how Washington state ended up in the position we now find ourselves. So the political fight has become yet another un-fun aspect of enjoying our hobby.

THAT is my pet peeve.
 
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Every word rings true...
 
One of mine is what passes for a gun show here in the Olympia area. Last two times I went to the Big Top show at the Thurston County Fairgrounds it was basically one single dealer plus a half dozen other small vendors of misc crap. I was born and lived in Dallas Texas for 62 years and it took 4-5 hours to walk though every aisle at one of our gun shows if you didn't spend a lot of time at any of the tables.

I'll add that to me it is sad to see so many black rifles and so little of the vintage blue steel and wood stock stuff. When I was in my 20's and 30's there was still lots of military surplus guns and parts to buy. It wasn't hard to find Garands, M1 carbines, M1903 Springfields, 1911's, Lugers, P38s, Mauser rifles of all kinds, and all the parts for them. Of course the early AR15/M16 parts dealers started showing up too but it was mostly mil-surplus parts and used magazines. There were tons of Colt single actions and Winchester lever guns. Then when the S&W 39 and 59 were being adopted by police forces, followed by the Glock 17 and P226 there were tons of S&W revolver trade-ins. You could get a real nice S&W M10 with lots of the original blue finish left for $175. Which was a deal when the 6" blue Pythons were selling for $386 new.

And all the guys there walking around with a rifle on each shoulder with a wood dowel in the barrel with their for sale sign and info. Or the backpack with the guns for sale sign. I learned how to smile and politely ask what they had, and the art of doing the deal. Right there. Face to face. With cash. And no paperwork.

Back then there were plenty of guns available but not enough money in my life to buy all that I wanted. Now that I have the money the great vintage guns aren't there in front of me anymore. I don't consider browsing through the classifieds or Gunbroker the same thing as those huge old Texas gun shows of the 1970's and 80's.

So that's my pet peeve - that time marches on.
Definitely don't waste your time on gun shows until we straighten out this state.
You may have some success attending the few live auctions near you, but be ready for a long night. And waiting for all the furniture and nick nacks to go by.
 
I know this one might offend some people, but I swear I'm not a grammar nazi, even though I might think like one sometimes…

My pet peeve is this idea that a "negligent discharge" is not an "accidental discharge".

Baloney. If it's not intentional, then it's accidental. "Unintentional" is a synonym for "accidental".

Negligence causes accidents, so a negligent discharge is a type of accidental discharge, according to the dictionary definition of "accident". Being accidental doesn't lessen the consequences of negligence, and accidental doesn't mean faultless.
 
Firearm related peeves.... metal detectors... and entry security with pretty hair (is that eyeliner??)... and tend to be a little "gropey".
"I'm almost there... just a little bit longer...don't stop..." would be worth it for the reaction of others waiting for their grope session.
 
I just found this thread but haven't gone completely through it, so not sure if this has been mentioned or not.

Biggest peeve for me is people who ignore or are lazy at following range safety rules.

The most egregious and common broken rule I've observed is people uncasing their firearm at the work bench at the back of the range, NOT at the firing line. This happens most often with pistols at an indoor range.

They're moving their firearm around at the back table, adjusting stuff, adding or removing gear, getting it ready. The muzzle is pointing everywhere, except ONLY down range. Sometimes they're staging multiple firearms.

Then they move to the firing-line bench or pedestal, rack the slide and put a chamber flag in it.

While they were working at the back table, as well as when they turned with the firearm in their hand to walk to the firing line, they flagged me and everyone else in the room a couple of times.

How can they be sure when they uncased their firearm that they hadn't left a round in the chamber from their last range visit? It happens to the best of us.

Newbies do this a lot. It's entertaining to watch it happen at the Clackamas Public Safety Training Center. Depending on the RSO working at the time, you either get your ears chewed off, or kicked out for the day. (Bless those RSOs.)

For an experienced shooter to do this at a range, even if they are by themselves at the time, is, IMO, lazy safety practice. And lazy safety practice is how negligent discharges (and people being shot) happen.

Take what you like and leave the rest.

Cheers.
I also dislike being around people who are careless while handling firearms and I try to avoid being in proximity, however it does happens frequently in American gun culture. There is no shortage of YouTube videos where the creators find it hilarious to have a novice, young or small framed individual fire a large caliber firearm knowing that individual will not be prepared for the recoil, in fact that is what they are counting on for their amusement. Many don't even have the common sense to make certain the gun is only loaded with a single around.
It is only funny if the individual arranging the situation is mistakenly hit by a round.
 
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This was Texas. No BGC required and no law preventing face-to-face sales between non-dealers. The actual dealers required a Form 4473. But the definition of dealer was different back then (or at least the enforcement was different) and there were guys with 6-8 guns on a table who were not FFL holders and thus no paperwork. You could sell your "personal collection" back then and not have to be a dealer.

We have become so used to our current situation as "normal" that it is hard to accept the paradigm shift required to imagine what it used to be like and how our freedom has been gradually eroded. In the 1970's in Texas you could walk into a gun show and walk out with history in your hands. That was mostly the appeal to me even in my younger days. And it is the part of gun shows that I miss the most now that I am older.

But that was nothing new. Have you ever seen a Bannerman catalog, or the post WWI ads in the early gun magazines? You used to be able to buy surplus arms through the mail, with almost no questions asked.

I think people have changed. Charles Whitman in the tower at UT Austin was such a shocking anomaly. Now some idiot shoots up their town every week. I get it that the change in people has required some changes in the laws. But it has swung really far in the direction of excessively restrictive laws. It is not as easy to be a gun guy as it used to be and I will suggest it is not as much fun either. It may be heresy to say it here, but sometimes I think the best way for us older guys with our links to the past to stay positive is to stay off the internet. The problem with that is that is is exactly how Washington state ended up in the position we now find ourselves. So the political fight has become yet another un-fun aspect of enjoying our hobby.

THAT is my pet peeve.

I should explain, that I'm only 13 years into this great hobby/endeavor. So chronologically I'm an adolescent in the gun owning community. Even though I'm 68. I did buy a gun from a member here not too long after I joined the forum in 201l. In a parking lot near the I5, I think. It was an interesting thing, but not creepy. I don't remember what year they made the BGC law. Point is, I don't remember days buying guns from the guys walking the aisles at gun shows. With that said, I don't mind the background checks. Not like I could do anything about it anyway? What I DO MIND is the bastiges making it more and more difficult get a smooth BGC and get on with your life.
I know this one might offend some people, but I swear I'm not a grammar nazi, even though I might think like one sometimes…

My pet peeve is this idea that a "negligent discharge" is not an "accidental discharge".

Baloney. If it's not intentional, then it's accidental. "Unintentional" is a synonym for "accidental".

Negligence causes accidents, so a negligent discharge is a type of accidental discharge, according to the dictionary definition of "accident". Being accidental doesn't lessen the consequences of negligence, and accidental doesn't mean faultless.
I never thought of it that way? I always cringed at "Accidental" because that's like "Oh, woops, I dropped my doughnut!" which doesn't mean diddly, except a dirty doughnut. "Negligent" discharge is something that can not be allowed. Well, unless you were pointed down range and had a 1.5lb trigger pull and didn't expect the shot?
 
If someone is selling something and they put "RARE" but do not include "VERY DESIRABLE " it kinda makes me mad inside a lil bit at least a "GET IT WHILE YOU CAN " would suffice
"Rare" is generally one of the first three words, allowing you to move along without wasting too much time.

R eally
A bove
R ealistic
E xpectations
 

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