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weak recoil spring in a 1911????

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by seebass, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. seebass

    seebass colton New Member

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    I would like to know some of the problems a weak recoil spring will cause in a 1911.

    How do I tell if I need to change it? I do not know the round count.

    Thanks...
     
  2. FullCaliberII

    FullCaliberII Pierce County, WA Active Member

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    Buy a new spring and compare it to the old one. If the old one is 1/6 less in length than the new ones, swap it out.
    Recoil springs for a 1911 are dirt cheap and everyone carries them (Midway, Brownells, Amazon, etc.) so buy a few, its an easy fix. Putting in a new one is a good idea regardless of the length/age of the old one.
     
  3. Longshot34

    Longshot34 Moses Lake Member

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    If its a govt model measure the spring and let me know. I have a bunch of springs I got in a lot of parts a few years ago. Lemme know the length and I'll check against mine (unsure if new or used). If I have one you can have it.
     
  4. Greenbug

    Greenbug Bend Well-Known Member

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    If your spring is weak or worn out it can cause some issues with your gun. A weak recoil spring can cause eventual damage or added stress to your gun because it is no longer strong enough to help control the rearward velocity of the recoiling slide when firing. Feeding issues and failure to go into full battery (closed action) are also symptoms of a weakened recoil spring on a 1911. Replace the spring if you think it is worn, they are cheap insurance.
     
  5. seebass

    seebass colton New Member

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    Thats it.Thanks!!!
     
  6. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    The original blueprints for the 1911 specified a spring a tad under 14lbs...13.88 to be exact...and the gun functioned well.

    A properly running 1911 will function with a 10lb spring...and function well.

    The crux comes from the point that Greenbug makes; "...eventual damage or added stress..."

    Since GI ammo of that day was running a bit over 800fps, coupled with a 13.88lb spring, me thinks they will run and not self-destruct.

    The point I'm trying to make? If the gun fails to run with a 'weak' spring, one will need to figure out how weak the spring is. As the gun, if running properly, should run with a 'weak' spring, if not...installing a heavier spring is masking a possible bigger problem, by forcing the gun to function.

    Yes, I've heard of many a gun having reliability issues problems with 'weak' recoil springs, and a new spring fixes the problem. But if the gun is set up properly, it won't make a difference.

    Generally, if the brass is being ejected out to the next county..its most likely wise to install a new one.