Want info on concealable pistols

Discussion in 'Handgun Discussion' started by intalltrees, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. intalltrees

    intalltrees
    Ridgefield, WA
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    What does it take to get a concealable permit in WA? Want advice on pistol and caliber. Am interested in Walther PPK .380ACP and a revolver in .327 magnum. Should be something both my wife and I can shoot and be comfortable with it.
     
  2. chunkeymonkey66

    chunkeymonkey66
    chehalis
    Highway to Hell

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    If you have a PULSE and a clean record your local sheriff will issue.. Check out Sig Sauer P238 for the .380 too. Smith and Wesson rule the revolver world. I am sure these comments will get you plenty of feedback.
     
  3. Both Eyes Open

    Both Eyes Open
    Hood Canal
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    Pulse, clean record and 55 bucks. Pretty simple. Kitsap co sheriffs are pretty easy to deal with.
    They actually were glad to give me one. As for concealed pistols, I really like my sig 229
    in .40 s&w. There are smaller ones though. Good luck!
     
  4. Benihaus

    Benihaus
    Portland
    American

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    Had the PK 380 for a while (sold it in the classifieds actually), good but not great gun. The safety is a bit of a pain sometimes in normal shooting there is a tendency to brush the safety on without noticing, which while running through a mag feels like a FTE or a broken firing pin. Just my 2 pennies anyway, welcome to the forum though and good luck finding the perfect weapon for yourself!
     
  5. A.I.P.

    A.I.P.
    UpperUS
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    HEY, READ THE POSTING REGS!
     
  6. ATCclears

    ATCclears
    Seattle area, WA
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  7. intalltrees

    intalltrees
    Ridgefield, WA
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    A.I.P. --Was your statement about the posting regs meant for me or someone else? What's it about?
     
  8. intalltrees

    intalltrees
    Ridgefield, WA
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    Thanks.
     
  9. rickstick

    rickstick
    Issaquah
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    It's easy. Just go to local police department and fill out the app. Takes about a week to get permit. Around $40 and good for several years.
     
  10. bikejunkie

    bikejunkie
    Salem
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    I've had 2 different Oregon State Troopers tell me that .380 auto is a great carry gun because it's so compact, but don't expect to drop someone with it- just expect that you can sting them hard enough you can get away. A Sig P238 will be my next weapon for when I'm wearing lighter clothes in summer and don't want to roll with my XDm 3.8 compact 9mm
     
  11. wombat

    wombat
    Kirkland, WA
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    ... well this might start something and I don't want a thread hijack, but a .380, in my opinion and supported by others, is the last resort for defence/use of deadly force (as should be ANY firearm).
    Google the use of .380 (mouseguns) for defence, lots of comments, blogs and suggested/recommended/oft discussed threads.

    The bad guy is going to have be close - are you comfy at 10 feet? - for effectiveness.
    Range practice at 7 yards for a reason. Many know the difference between 22 feet and 10 feet in terms of reaction.

    Your wife may also like the P238; you may have to get 2!



    A .380 is not going to win a gunfight - shot placement and how close perhaps. Up close and personal, most will feel it, but one can never be sure of any human reaction to trauma.
    The 380 is indeed a great concealed carry; more as a backup to the primary. As said many times here and elsewhere, a 380 in the IWB/pocket is better than the [insert bigger caliber] at home.

    I've ignored the usual FMJ self defence round and now stick to Buffalo Bore 100gr Flat Nose for my P238 carry; a couple of +P and std pressure in the same mag. I would never use a JHP in a .380.
     
  12. XSubSailor

    XSubSailor
    SW WA
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    The .380ACP has caused the demise of many an assailant....even the .22LR is fatal with good shot placement.

    Proficiency and modern self-defense ammo are the key to an effective carry gun.

    Disclaimer: My current carry pistol is an H&K P2000 in .357Sig I carry in a MTAC IWB Holster. My BUG is a Sig P238 (.380 ACP Gold Dots) in an ankle or pocket holster.
     
  13. Ought Six

    Ought Six
    Snoqualmie Valley area
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    Handguns are marginal defensive weapons at best. Sometime people shoot an assailant several times with a serious caliber handgun, with good hits, and fail to stop him. The most you can do is to increase your odds.

    The most important thing is your mindset. You have to keep alert to your surroundings. You have to be able to look at potential threats and size them up. You have to keep cool, and not let fear or anger overrule your common sense. You have to avoid trouble and retreat from a fight if at all possible. And if it comes down to it and there is no other option, you must be prepared to act decisively, without hesitation, to protect your own life and the lives of your loved ones using deadly force.

    Shot placement is probably the second most important thing. To achieve good shot placement, practice is vital. *Lots* of realistic practice under realistic conditions. That means drawing and firing from your concealment holster, low-light shooting, targets that are moving towards you rapidly, shooting under stress, and so on. Professional training is best, but if you cannot afford that, there are plenty of YouTube videos out there that can help you create a realistic training regimen.

    You also need a firearm you can shoot well. That means a pistol that fit your hand, that points naturally for you, and that has good sights (night sights are big plus) and at least an adequate trigger feel and pull weight. The gun should be in the most powerful caliber you and your wife can comfortably shoot. That may well be a bigger caliber than you think.

    In choosing a defensive pistol, one of the best things you can do is go to a range that rents pistols and try some out. What handguns you read about and think is best may be very, very different from what actually works for you. Doing this will save you time, money and frustration.

    You will also need a good concealment holster. Do not cut corners and get a cheap, low-quality holster. It is a vital part of your concealed carry system. After trying many different holsters over the years, I have settled on the Bladetech Nano IWB holster. Use what works for you.

    You should also learn some weapon retention techniques. If an assailant grabs the firearm as you draw, you will end up in a wrestling match for the gun. I have personally been in this situation, and believe me, it is not where you want to be. If they take your gun away from you, chances are they will shoot you with it. Again, professional training is best, but if you cannot afford it, look for YouTube videos on the subject and practice these techniques with a friend using a toy or replica gun.

    Again, all of these things will increase your odds of winning in a deadly confrontation. There is no 'dirty fighting' or 'unfair moves' in a gunfight. Do whatever you can do to win, and be as well prepared as you can be.
     

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