(spittoon ping) Well howdy partners! How about a picture thread devoted to the wackiest, most outlandishly adorned, curious experimental designs, or otherwise oddball front-stuffers? According to Hoyle, gots to be:

  • From 19th or very early 20th century.
  • A muzzle-loader of some kind. Ignition can be by any means.
  • Weird-o.
Yeehaw! (Enjoy.)
 
Here's one...not too wacky maybe...but pretty.
F. E. Seiferth made plains rifle.
St. Louis made and marked....circa 1840's -1860's.
.50 Caliber , back action lock , half stock ( walnut ) , brass patch box and inlays , gold bands at the breech.
Still shoots well ... I have won a few rifle matches with it and taken deer as well
Andy


 
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Also have two "tacky guns"....:D
Brass tacks were traded by the millions...
And popular to add to the stock of firearms , belts , knife handles , tomahawks , you name it...

A half stocked trade rifle by J.Henry circa 1840's..and a Northwest Tradegun by Parker Field Circa 1850's.
The rifle is .52 caliber and the Tradegun is a 20 gauge.
The rifle is still in flintlock...the Tradegun has been converted to percussion in its working lifetime.
Both have seen lots of use over the years...and still are shootable.
Andy

 
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Beautiful artistry on the F. E. Seiferth. I've always admired the pineapple adornment, in particular.

Beyond the handy work, all of those firearms have a "if this gun could just talk" type thing, considering when and where they were made. :)
Thank you... :D
If they could talk...lets hope that it would be more than genuine frontier gibberish....:eek: :D
Andy
 
Thank you... :D
If they could talk...lets hope that it would be more than genuine frontier gibberish....:eek: :D
Andy
I couldn't help but think of a time in which my wife's college friend visited with her husband, and we took them to a museum dedicated to the Applegate Trail. There was a fellow in buckskins describing things in the manner of that time and place. Both were from back east and looked visibly befuddled. After we left, my Esposita said simply "it's genuine frontier gibberish". At which point I lost my composure. :s0165:
 
More weirdness...
My flintlock fowler.
Made by Geroge Lalroux .
He was a Belgium gun maker and his company was around from 1834 - 1920.
This particular 20 gauge fowler is in very cherry shape , and not fired much if at all , till I got ahold of it.... :eek: :D

Weird ...'cause I think its a flintlock made around 1900 -1920 and meant to be used....

Half stock and extremely light...it handles nicely...and shoots well.
Well enough to break clay birds in the air...and get grouse for me.
Also does nicely with a patch and round ball.
Andy

 
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Dang it Andy, I've just got to get in here. :)
Nothing museum quality like yours. :( A Trapper .50 cal. kit Pistol, a Matchlock .70 cal., A .50 cal "Franken" Rifle and my .70 cal. Blunderbuss.
Mainly Garage mechanic winter projects, fun stuff.
Sorry about the sizing..I have to practice my photography. :s0092:

31-The Family.jpg BB-2.jpg Finished-1.jpg
 
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(spittoon ping) Well howdy partners! How about a picture thread devoted to the wackiest, most outlandishly adorned, curious experimental designs, or otherwise oddball front-stuffers? According to Hoyle, gots to be:

  • From 19th or very early 20th century.
  • A muzzle-loader of some kind. Ignition can be by any means.
  • Weird-o.
Yeehaw! (Enjoy.)
Colt 1851 with stock that is also a canteen.

 
Here's one...not too wacky maybe...but pretty.
F. E. Seiferth made plains rifle.
St. Louis made and marked....circa 1840's -1860's.
.50 Caliber , back action lock , half stock ( walnut ) , brass patch box and inlays , gold bands at the breech.
Still shoots well ... I have won a few rifle matches with it and taken deer as well
Andy


Day-um, dude... some amazing stuff in yer closet there!;)
 
More weirdness...
My flintlock fowler.
Made by Geroge Lalroux .
He was a Belgium gun maker and his company was around from 1834 - 1920.
This particular 20 gauge fowler is in very cherry shape , and not fired much if at all , till I got ahold of it.... :eek: :D

Weird ...'cause I think its a flintlock made around 1900 -1920 and meant to be used....

Half stock and extremely light...it handles nicely...and shoots well.
Well enough to break clay birds in the air...and get grouse for me.
Also does nicely with a patch and round ball.
Andy

Might this have been one of the late dated muskets made for the "native" hunting trade in places like equatorial Afrika and Asia? The locals wanted/needed firearms for hunting and protection in the bush but needed them to be simple and easily serviced and of no major threat to the European occupiers... Such were also used as Indian trade guns around the Great Lakes region in the pre-cartridge era. One could do much worse than a 20ga flint fowler...
 
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He was a Belgium gun maker and his company was around from 1834 - 1920.
Please bear with me on this one. After almost 70 years, I'm still trying to comprehend why Americans describing things from Belgium, or even the people themselves, as 'Belgium' and not 'Belgian'.

You don't say that a gun made in England is an 'England' gun, or that a car from Germany is a 'Germany' car.

Every country has its correct adjective, Scotland/Scottish, Ireland/Irish, Finland/Finnish, Indonesia/Indonesian and so on.

Belgium has Belgian.

So why not?
 

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