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value of a Remington model 600 .222 cal

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by timwald144, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. timwald144

    timwald144 Washington county New Member

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    I was wondering what the value is on the above rifle in fair condition.
     
  2. Greenbug

    Greenbug Bend Well-Known Member

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    Really hard to tell without pics. Depends on wether or not you have a buyer who really wants it or not also. Could be anywhere between $300-$600 depending on condition and market.
     
  3. timwald144

    timwald144 Washington county New Member

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    OK I will try and snap a few photos. I have someone who wants to sell me his gun. Said 500 with a Bushnell 4x12 scope.
     
  4. Greenbug

    Greenbug Bend Well-Known Member

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    Unless it's a newer elite series bushnell scope it really dosen't add much to the value.
     
  5. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    I have several and I have paid 300-700. All depends on overall condition! The laminated stocks and magnum cal are more...

    I had my eye on one at a local shop in .243 and it was 649. It was gone inna week.
     
  6. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The Remington 600 is actually MORE common in .222 than .223 (this as a result of the .223 cartridge just barely coming into its own toward the end of M600 production: until that time the .222 was more popular).

    You say "fair condition". I wonder if you are using this in the NRA condition-rating sense (pretty doggy shape), or as in a merely descriptive sense (the gun is in average to better shape).

    The stipulation regarding scope value offered by a previous poster is correct: General rule here is that unless of premium quality (Leupold, Zeiss, etc.), a scope on a highpower gun adds little or no value. Sellers who DO enjoy the embellishment of their offering carrying a premium scope may be better served by selling the scope and rifle separately. The reasoning here is that a quality gun purchased by a knowledgeable new owner will instantly have the garden-variety optics removed and replaced with higher grade. This is a good rule of thumb, and of course exceptions exist.

    $500 for a M600 is probably about ballpark for a .222 in (NRA) good condition. M600's are quite collectable, but persons involved in that pursuit are seeking guns in best of condition. Fine 600's in the rare calibers (.223, .350, 6.5) can fetch prices at $1500 or greater.

    If the Bushnell is "of the period" (a scope that might have been installed at the time of the gun's original purchase), this would be an exception to the general rule of thumb noted above regarding optics, but only if the scope and gun are of collector grade condition.

    If you are willing to deal with the unusualness of a .222 (ammo not generally on the shelves anymore), and you are attracted likewise by the unusualness of the M600 action (both are actually attractions for me), $500 would be an honest price for an honest gun. At that asking price, I would want to see it in hand.
     
  7. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Things to look for on a 600 (buying used):

    The ventilated rib on these guns is constructed of a plastic polymer, attached to the barrel with screws through the ribs. It was common for these guns to ride in truck rifle racks, upside down with the weight of the gun resting on the plastic rib. This, combined with the heat that develops in greenhouse effect through the truck window very often warped the rib, to the end result of it appearing to have "waves" along its top contour. In fact a 600 NOT showing some waviness on the rib is quite unusual.

    The "floorplate" on these guns (quotations because it is really an extended trigger guard, and the action is actually a blind magazine type) is of the same polymer. It too will warp with time and show a bulge just ahead of the trigger guard loop.

    Neither of these affect the operation of the gun, but they do detract from appearance. I do believe that ribs and floorplates (trigger guards) are aftermarketed, and installing these new aluminum parts can restore appearance (but of course detract from collector value).

    It is also not known to many unfamiliar with these actions that the bolt release is not readily operated without help from a thin-blade screwdriver, inserted between the action wall and the bolt on the left side, and finding the release there, pushed forward and down. This is useful information for the prospective buyer, in order that he be able to inspect the bore and bolt face.

    Many are also under the mistaken impression that the XP100 Fireball pistol was designed after the 600 rifle. In actuality the reverse is true. The Fireball was the debut of this action type.

    Also, it is not unusual for ads to appear for a Model 600, and upon visual inspection the buyer discovers a later, more economical version known as the Mohawk. It sports no vent rib, the metal finish is not polished, and may have a hardwood (not walnut) stock. These guns are somewhat less desirable to the collectors, but still very good and accurate guns. In an interesting turn of events on this website, I discovered a true 600 advertised as a Mohawk. I kindly corrected the seller toward advising him he had the more desirable version (but I'm not certain my effort helped much: The gun I believe was still for sale at last report).
     
  8. unklekippy

    unklekippy In The Mountains Near Sprague River Well-Known Member

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    The plastic parts and vent rib are why I prefer the 660 over the 600. Still, the 600 is a great, underappreciated rifle. I have a 660 in .308 that might be my favorite rifle. A 600 in .243 is close behind it. If you can get your hands on 500 or 1,000 pieces of brass and dies you can reload them until you shoot out the barrel. Kip.
     
    Spitpatch and (deleted member) like this.
  9. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yes! The 660 was the "swan song" for the 600 series. It displayed a slightly longer barrel, a fancier stock, and most of the (few) complaints about the 600 were addressed including removal of the "ray-gun" rib and "shark fin" front sight (both genetic traits transferred from the Fireball pistol). I have never owned a 660, but I am certain if I had, I would share kip's preference for it.

    I have a great complaint regarding the 600's, in that I can't hold on to them for long (despite my attraction to them). Invariably when I acquire one (of which there have been five or six over the years, including a Mohawk), and get it scoped and tuned and loaded for (always impressively reminded how accurate these guns are), someone with a kid just starting out in the big game venture shows up needing a first gun. I'm a sucker for kids learning to hunt. The 600, being of perfect dimensions for handling by a young person goes off to a new home, with a polite request that I get rights of first refusal should the new owner choose to part with it in the future.

    So far, (and somewhat regrettably) none have come back. And so I keep my eyes peeled for the next one.