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Type S Redding dies .308 Match set

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by DSbur, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. DSbur

    DSbur Vancouver WA Member

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    Just so I understand better, I have a 3-die set of Redding .308 dies, (1) body die (2) Type S Neck bushing die, (3) micrometer competition seating die.

    I am reloading for a Remmy 700 .308 milspec 5R using once fired Lapua brass.

    I understand that the body die does not affect the sizing of the neck, and that it would be primarily used for bumping shoulders back a few thousandths to facilitate chambering if and when the shoulder starts causing hard chambering. It can also be used to full-length resize the entire case without affecting the neck area.

    I understand that the Type S neck sizing die (with bushings of appropriate size) is used to facilitate consistent neck tension and primarily affects the neck area of the cartridge and NOT the body.

    As far as the neck sizing die, is it correct that it does NOT bump the shoulder under any adjustment? My suspicions are that I need to visually inspect the progress of a neck sizing operation in order to stop the bushing from touching the neck of the cartridge, or perhaps the die itself does that, not sure.

    I am trying to develop a reloading program that is consistant, and my thoughts are that I should run all fire-formed brass through the body die first, then through the neck sizing die. I don't have a handle on whether the neck sizing die can also affect shoulder bump.

    Any F-class or tactical folks out there who can help me out?
     
  2. OregonJohn

    OregonJohn Sutherlin, Or Bronze Life Member #1 Lifetime Supporter

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    I have been using this type of die set for years in a custom 6BR. I only resize about one third of the neck on my brass. The rest of the neck is left alone to center in the chamber, just as the fired case is a better fit and not resized. If your case body gets tight, just bump it back as little as possible. Get the carbide neck sized bushings so you don't need to use any case lube. If you size just a little of the case neck and remove it, you can see the line where the sizing stopped. You will have to try a few different size bushing to see what tension your gun likes. To answer your question. The neck bushing is just sitting on the bottom of the die on a shelf. It can only size to the neck base. It will self center. Run a case in the die without the bushing in it. Run the die down onto the case, then back off about half turn and lock it down. Drop the bushing in and go to town.
     
  3. DSbur

    DSbur Vancouver WA Member

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    Thanks, that's what I was thinking. I've got several sizes of the TiN bushings and so far after measuring loaded rounds it seems the .336 bushing is where to start with .002 tension. Am also using the Imperial neck lube (graphite looking material).

    I'll wait on the body die until I seem to really need it. I was just curious if there was a progression to use it early on. I suspect I'll need to fire the cases several times before I really need it-